When Can I Start Putting Lotion On My Tattoo?

When Can I Start Putting Lotion On My Tattoo

You should start moisturizing your tattoo as soon as it starts to dry — not before. This can generally take about 1–3 days after you got your tattoo. Be sure to wash and dry your tattoo with antibacterial soap and choose the appropriate moisturizer as well.

If you’re new to tattoos, we recommend that you educate yourself on the complete healing process. We go into detail on the precautions you need to take, how to get the job done, and how often to moisturize.

If you’re a tattoo-head, it might be worth your while to get a refresher, as well.

Can I put lotion on my new tattoo?

Should I apply lotion to my tattoo? What kind of tattoo care products do you recommend? – Yes! Moisturizing your tattoo regularly is extremely important. You should moisturize your clean tattoo 3 – 6 times per day, for roughly two weeks (though proper skincare is always important, and most tattoo enthusiasts moisturize their tattoos daily for life!). A white cream lotion or moisturizer, preferably unscented, should be used! We recommend these fragrance-free, white cream lotions:  Aveeno , Curel , and Eucerin . Be warned: your favorite fragranced lotion is not a good option for moisturizing your tattoo – this can cause an excruciating burning sensation when applied to the tattoo, which is essentially an open wound. The fewer chemicals in the product, the better! Pure cocoa butter or shea butter is also popular for darker skin tones and is a fine option. There are some manufacturers who design products specifically for tattoo aftercare that work well for long-term care (such as Tattoo Goo , H2Ocean , and Hustle Butter ). Do NOT use aloe vera gel to moisturize, and we don’t recommend A&D ointment either, as the oil in these products can extract some of the ink from your tattoo.

What happens if you moisturize your tattoo too soon?

What Are The Risks of Over Moisturizing a Tattoo? – By applying thicker layers of lotion or ointment, several times a day (or every hour or two as some people do), you’re risking over-moisturizing a tattoo. By over-moisturizing a tattoo, you can cause the following problems;

  • Due to excess moisture, the tattoo won’t be able to dry and heal
  • Excess moisture can create a perfect environment for bacteria and germ growth
  • Over moisturizing can lead to tattoo inflammation and infection
  • Excess moisture can cause clogged pores since the moisturizer prevents the skin from breathing
  • Excess moisture can cause the tattooed skin to break out

To avoid these issues, make sure to follow the moisturizing rules we mentioned before. However, make sure to not under moisturizing your tattoo as well. Some people are afraid they might over-moisturize their tattoo, so they leave it dehydrated, which results in heavy scabbing and tattoo dryness. So, make sure to stay in the middle and simply apply a thin layer of lotion/ointment twice a day.

How do you know your tattoo is healed?

– It’s important to know the signs that your tattoo isn’t healing properly or has become infected. Symptoms of improper healing include:

  • Fever or chills. A fever may indicate that your tattoo has become infected, and you should see a doctor right away.
  • Prolonged redness. All tattoos will be somewhat red for a few days after the procedure, but if the redness doesn’t subside , it’s a sign that your tattoo isn’t healing well.
  • Oozing fluid. If fluid or pus is still coming out from your tattoo after 2 or 3 days, it may be infected. See a doctor.
  • Swollen, puffy skin. It’s normal for the tattoo to be raised for a few days, but the surrounding skin shouldn’t be puffy. This may indicate that you’re allergic to the ink.
  • Severe itching or hives. Itchy tattoos can also be a sign that your body is allergic to the ink. The allergic reaction to a tattoo can happen right after, or as much as several years after getting the tattoo.
  • Scarring. Your tattoo will scab over because it’s a wound, but a properly healed tattoo shouldn’t scar. Signs of scarring include raised, puffy skin, redness that doesn’t fade, distorted colors within the tattoo, or pitted skin.

What happens if you don’t moisturize your tattoo?

– Tattoo dry healing isn’t risky in itself, but there are some risks and side effects that you should be aware of before trying it out:

  • Your skin may itch or burn because of a lack of moisture in the area, so it may feel impossible to ignore the urge to scratch.
  • Larger areas of your skin may get extremely dry, scabbing more deeply and cracking open over large swathes that can affect how your tattoo looks when the healing process is done.
  • Dry skin may tighten up, making it easier for skin to crack and affect how your tattoo looks after it heals.

Should I moisturize a scabbing tattoo?

Tattoo Scabbing | Aftercare & Healing – A new tattoo will flake and peel during the healing process and may even scab a little bit. To prevent a new tattoo from overly scabbing and thus possibly losing color and clarity, the first two weeks is the most critical time to carefully follow aftercare tips.

  1. Whether you use an aftercare product suggested by the tattoo artist, an over-the-counter ointment or an unscented hand lotion or moisturizer, you must keep your tattoo moist;
  2. If it dries out and starts cracking, where it splits is where you are going to see scabbing;

While keeping it moist is vitally important, you can overdo it and keep it too moist or what you’d call saturated. Avoid using petroleum or lanolin based product that clogs your pores. These products can not only pull out color, but they actually hamper the healing process.

  • A slow healing tattoo has the potential to scab just as much as one that doesn’t get enough moisture during healing;
  • Wear loose clothing while your tattoo is healing;
  • Tight clothes that rub on a new tattoo can irritate and scrape the area to the point of pulling off flakes and scabs that aren’t ready to come off;

It’s also wise to wear clothing made of breathable materials such as cotton. Avoid nylons and polyesters. Keep it clean Gently wash your tattoo with a mild, antibacterial soap and your fingers. Never use a wash cloth, sponge, bath puff or any other material while washing the area.

Then, thoroughly rinse all of the soap off. It’s important to carefully remove this debris to prevent a new tattoo from scabbing. Don’t rub Rubbing your tattoo can pull off the thin layer that is also referred to as a scab which forms a protective layer over the fresh ink.

This scab is necessary and you don’t want to pull it off before it’s ready or you will end up with larger scabs that are harmful. Re-apply ointment, lotion or moisturizer Avoid Sweating Sports, gum etc can irritate a new tattoo, so try to avoid extremely physical activity.

Also avoid contact sports, where the protective scab can be knocked off. Don’t soak in any kind of water including bathtubs, oceans, lakes, swimming pools or hot tubs. Not only can the water seep under the skin and draw the ink out, any germs found in the water source can potentially cause infection, which can lead to scabbing and scarring.

Tattoo Scabbing – Healing Scabs can be unsightly, painful and itchy. Scabs are the encrusted formation that forms atop a wound during the healing process. Designed to keep germs and bacteria from invading the wound and leading the infection, they can be unsightly.

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Improper caring of scabs can lead to permanent scarring. Reasons for Scabs: The tattoo starts to scab over, similar to a scab that may occur if you’ve been badly sun burned. This is a natural reaction, as the top layer of skin becomes a little crusty, protecting the open wound (tattoo) underneath.

After a few days, the natural healing process of the tattoo causes the skin to form a complete scab over the entire image. This scab should be very thin and flaky if you’ve taken care of your tattoo correctly. Once the tattoo finishes healing, the scab begins to peel, eventually falling off completely on its own.

During this time, it’s important not to pick the scab or it could pull the ink out of the fresh tattoo underneath. What to avoid: Don’t pick at the scab; give it time to heal undisturbed. Picking scabs open not only exposes the cut to bacteria, but keeps it from healing properly and will eventually lead to scarring.

Clean the scab with warm, soapy water. Don’t rub on it or you risk having it fall off. Dry it immediately after washing. Keep the scab moist by applying a warm, wet compress one to two times a day. This will help promote healing by allowing the    skin beneath the scab to regenerate.

Apply lotion to the scab to keep it healthier and less likely to fall off or become cracked. Apply an antibiotic ointment to the scab between soakings to help keep it from hardening. Avoid soaking the scab in excess water.

This can cause the scab to fall off, which will restart the healing process, making it so another scab has to form. Allow the scab to get as much air as possible to promote healing. If you cover the scab, make sure it still has airflow. Talk to your doctor about chemical peeling for scabs and scars.

How do I take care of my tattoo the first week?

Aftercare for Your Tattoo – So, how can you make sure that new tattoo is something you don’t end up regretting? Follow these steps while your new tattoo heals.

  1. Be sure your artist covers your new tattoo in a thin layer of petroleum jelly and a bandage.
  2. Remove the bandage after 24 hours. Gently wash the tattoo with antimicrobial soap and water  and be sure to pat dry.
  3. Apply a layer of antibacterial/Vaseline ointment twice a day, but don’t put on another bandage.
  4. Gently wash your tattoo area twice a day with soap and water and gently pat dry before reapplying the antibacterial/Vaseline ointment.
  5. Keep applying a moisturizer or ointment after you clean it to keep it moist.

You should repeat this process for 2 to 4 weeks. Also try not to wear clothes that will stick to your tattoo, and avoid swimming and the sun for about 2 weeks. And take cool showers. Scalding hot water will not only hurt, but it can also fade the ink. Wear a physical blocker sunscreen  with at least 7% zinc oxide sunscreen during the daylight hours and/or cover it up (with clothing, a bandage).

Why does my tattoo look like it’s cracking?

Why Does Tattoo Cracking Occur? – Tattoo cracking, like almost anything in the world, occurs due to a number of contributing factors. So, to understand its occurrence, we need to understand the causes of the cracking. Here are the most common reasons tattoo cracking occurs;

  • The skin is drying out, or your skin is generally dry – this is one of the most common reasons tattoos crack. Either your skin is naturally dry, which means your daily water intake does not meet the recommended amount of a minimum of 8 glasses of water per day. Or, your tattooed skin isn’t properly moisturized. Hydration and moisturizing of a tattoo are essential during the aftercare; that promotes proper healing and ensures the tattoo doesn’t crack.
  • Formation of scabs during healing – as the tattoo heals, it will start raising and forming scabs. Now, scabs don’t have to be a major issue, since they generally dry out and fall off on their own. However, with a lack of hydration and moisturizing, the scabs can become severe and larger or thicker than usual, which contributes to the cracking of the scabs, and as a result, the cracking of the tattoo.
  • Infection or allergic reaction – although rare, tattoo infection or allergic reaction to tattoo ink can cause tattoo cracking. This means that bacteria or germs have invaded the tattoo, which is at the beginning considered to be an open wound. This required immediate medical attention and proper treatment to prevent further tattoo damage and health issues.
  • You’re cleaning your dry tattoo with warm water – now, this is a major no-no. By washing a dry tattoo with warm water, you’re taking away all the moisture from the skin. This will promote dryness and enable the tattoo cracking, especially if you don’t apply lotion or ointment afterward.

Do not be alarmed by the formation of scabs on the tattoo. This is a normal occurrence as the tattoo is an open wound that needs to heal. One of the parts of the healing process is the regeneration of the damaged skin which can only heal by creating a protective barrier, which is, in this case, scabs, Now, the scabs will normally crack.

What is an overworked tattoo?

When Can I Start Putting Lotion On My Tattoo Natalia Lebedinskaia/Shutterstock New tattoos usually take two to three weeks to fully heal, and with good aftercare, they should heal perfectly, per Glamour Magazine. However, there are times when the healing process of a new tattoo doesn’t go as smoothly as it should. This can be so in the case of overworked tattoos. Otherwise known as a tattoo blowout (via Healthline ), an overworked tattoo is what happens when a tattoo causes scarring or when the tattoo ink goes past the dermis layer and reaches the hypodermis, per Demi Ink.

  1. An effect of this is that the tattoo begins to look blurry, per Byrdie;
  2. Overworked tattoos are more likely when you patronize beginner tattoo artists, and the problem with overworked skin is that it only becomes truly apparent to the client once the tattoo begins to heal, per Saved Tattoo;

The discolored skin that slowly forms is a big hallmark of a tattoo blowout. It can be the result of the high voltage on the machine affecting its speed, per Tattooing 101. A tattoo artist going over a patch of skin more than once can also result in a tattoo blowout.

Why is my tattoo fading after 3 days?

When Can I Start Putting Lotion On My Tattoo This is a bit of a trick question. The reason being, is that a tattoo “fades” to the naked eye within days of application. This occurs because as the skin heals, the top layer dies and new skin forms to take its place. During this period the epidermis typically has a faded appearance. However, this is a natural part of the tattoo healing process and as the peeling subsides and the dead skin falls away the design will once again look crisp and fresh.

Still, it won’t have that same deep dark tone as it did when your tattooist put his/her gun away. Anyone who has received a tattoo already knows this. But what you want to know now, is when can you expect a tattoo to fade in the longer term.

Let’s have a look.

Do color tattoos hurt more?

So, Do Color Tattoos Hurt More? – Generally speaking, ink color doesn’t determine the amount of pain you’ll feel. The color simply doesn’t have to do anything with the pain of the tattoo. As we mentioned, tattoo placement, your pain tolerance, and your tattooist’s technique are the main factors determining how painful the process will be.

  1. Sure, there was a time when colored ink used to have a thicker consistency than black ink;
  2. This was an issue since it took the tattooist longer to pack the colored ink, which in itself hurts;
  3. The longer you’re getting tattooed, the higher the skin damage and the more painful the process becomes;
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Nowadays, all inks are of similar consistency, so there isn’t an issue there. Now, if your tattoo artist takes a long time to complete the tattoo, you’ll experience more pain as the process goes on. Also, if the tattoo artist uses a dull needle, chances are the process will hurt more.

Sharp, new needles tend to hurt less. Now, as the needle gets worn out, it remains sharp, but it dulls out a little bit. This small difference in needle sharpness can promote faster skin damage and of course, cause more pain.

If your tattooist uses white ink highlight , you can expect more pain. This is again not because of the needle or the ink color, but rather the pain is caused by the repetition of needle penetration in one place. In order for the white ink to fully show and become saturated, the tattooist needs to go over the same area several times.

That is what causes skin damage and pain. Now, after all of the information, we do have to point out that there are people who swear that the coloring/shading of the tattoo hurts more than the linework or tattoo outline.

Pain is a subjective thing, so it can be hard to be exact with the answer to whether color tattoos hurt more than regular ones.

Should I moisturize my tattoo while its peeling?

Moisturizing is Essential – When Can I Start Putting Lotion On My Tattoo During the peeling process, unless you’ve decided to take on the dry healing method it’s essential that you keep your tattoo moisturized. For the first three days after you get your tattoo, you should be cleaning your tattoo and washing, drying, and putting ointment on it regularly. On the fourth day, you can begin to use a recommended lotion for tattoos to keep your fresh ink moist and your healing skin hydrated while it continues to repair.

One of the most popular products for moisturizing tattoos is Hustle Butter Deluxe. It could be a good choice since it uses a gentle formula made from natural ingredients, doesn’t contain petroleum, and can be incorporated into your aftercare regimen from start to finish Putting lotion on your tattoo regularly will help relieve the itchiness you feel as well as improve your tattoo’s appearance.

Apply the lotion two to three times each day for the next 25 days or until it no longer peels or feels tight and taut on your skin. When you apply lotion to your tattoo, apply a thin layer over your skin. There is no need to put a thick coat of lotion on your tattoo, in fact it can be counter productive.

Can I just leave my tattoo alone?

Are There Any Disadvantages to Dry Healing a Tattoo? – For every argument in favor of dry healing, you’ll find a counter-argument. Critics of dry healing will point out, for instance, that it does nothing to relieve the itchiness that comes when your skin is healing after a tattoo.

That would be bad enough if it simply means you’ll spend a few weeks being more uncomfortable, but it’s worse than that. If you have a hard time putting up with the  itchiness  and you give in to the urge to scratch your tattoo, you can damage your skin before it has fully recovered.

If that’s the case, using an ointment that relieves the itchiness is likely a better alternative. The best tattoo lotion I’ve ever personally used is a vegan aftercare product called  After Inked Tattoo Aftercare Lotion. This stuff works amazingly well during the healing process; not only by keeping your tattoo really well hydrated but also by soothing any annoying itching and irritation.

  • When using it from the very start of the healing process, this lotion will help to decrease tattoo healing times and work towards eliminating any lingering dryness and scabbing;
  • Some people allege that those in favor of dry healing may have simply used the wrong types of ointments;

It’s true that some lotions have harsh chemicals or don’t contain enough of the ingredients that are friendly to your skin. However, if you do a bit of research you should be able to find creams that will deliver the  vitamins  your skin needs without any unnecessary additives. When Can I Start Putting Lotion On My Tattoo A tattoo that is so dry that the scabs have cracked and are now bleeding While proponents of dry healing profess that it speeds up the healing process, it could also tighten the skin, which makes it more likely that scabs will break. This, of course, will extend the amount of time it takes for your tattoo to heal, and could cause minor blemishes.

Should I let my tattoo dry out and peel?

The takeaway: – Peeling is normal (to an extent) but that doesn’t mean you should peel it yourself. Let your skin do its thing for the two-ish weeks and keep the tattoo clean and dry while it heals for the best results. If you experience any scabbing that seems abnormal (like thickening over the entire tattoo or green or yellow areas that fill up with puss), see your doctor to address the infection.

  • A poorly healed tattoo sucks but an infection left untreated would be way worse than that, trust;
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What lotion is safe for tattoos?

What kind of lotion is good for new tattoos?

Aquaphor is a classic for a multitude of skin ailments, especially in the winter time. It’s also great for protecting your freshly inked skin immediately following your tattoo session. Gutierrez recommends Aquaphor for the first two days following your tattoo, and then a basic moisturizer for two weeks after that.

What is the best lotion to put on a new tattoo?

We independently research, test, review, and recommend the best products. Healthcare professionals review articles for medical accuracy. Learn more about our process. If you buy something through our links, we may earn a commission. Byrdie / Chloe Jeong Tattoos deserve to be shown off, but before you can flash your new ink around, you have to diligently care for your tat to ensure proper healing.

One of the most important steps in the aftercare process is choosing a lotion that will keep your fresh design moisturized, free of infection, and without irritation, according to tattoo artists. Because a tattoo is technically a wound, tattoo lotions are incredibly important to not only keeping your ink looking good but to aiding in the healing process as well.

Finding your perfect lotion isn’t as easy as it sounds, however, and it’s not as easy as asking for help; everyone has their own favorite products. “I think what lotion you use depends a lot on climate and skin type. Also how much you apply is important too,” says Olive, the tattoo artist behind Oregon-based Damn Zippy.

“I prefer not to rep a certain brand because everyone is different and I want my clients to use what works for them, which might not necessarily be what works for me. ” Though it can be hard to choose from the array of lotions available, go in knowing what you want (vegan? water-based? budget or splurge?) and what will work best for your skin and new tattoo.

“I generally recommend that the person uses whatever they find most comfortable,” says hand-poke artist Harper of Melbourne’s Pocaharper. “After all, they have to wear it on their skin every day. ” Read on for the best tattoo lotions available now. Ulta What We Like

  • Super hydrating
  • Seals moisture into skin
  • Helps keep tattoo looking vibrant

What We Don’t Like

  • Not Byrdie Clean

Who else recommends it? Cosmopolitan, NBC News, and Verywell Health all picked Aquaphor Healing Ointment. What do buyers say? 88% of 59,600+ Amazon reviewers rated this product 5 stars. Aquaphor’s Healing Ointment is of the most widely used tattoo aftercare treatments, and you’ll find a lot of artists quick to recommend the old stand-by. Because the petrolatum-powered formula has occlusive properties, it creates a semi-permeable layer on top of the skin which allows moisture to be kept in and everything else to be kept out. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: No | Cruelty-Free: No What We Like

  • Calms and soothes skin
  • Not greasy
  • Can help with itching
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What We Don’t Like

  • Not Byrdie Clean

Aveeno may be a name you are used to hearing, and there’s a reason for that: It works. All of Aveeno’s products feature colloidal oatmeal , which moisturizes and calms inflammation while creating a protective barrier on top of your skin, meaning it’s great for both soothing and protecting your healing ink. This lotion is also free of parabens and fragrance, so it won’t irritate a fresh tattoo.

By holding in the skin’s natural moisture, it helps keep your tattoo fresh and promotes healing. Active Ingredients: Petrolatum | Skin Type: All | Size: 14 fl. Plus, it comes with a super affordable price tag, making it a must after any and every tattoo.

Active Ingredients: Dimethicone | Skin Type: All | Size: 18 fl. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: No | Cruelty-Free: No What Our Testers Say “Aveeno’s Daily Moisturizing Lotion will give you soft, silky, properly hydrated limbs. ” — Emily Algar , Product Tester What We Like

  • Byrdie Clean and cruelty-free
  • Contains antioxidants
  • Moisturizing

What We Don’t Like

  • Strong scent

Although Billy Jealousy’s Tattoo Lotion is a bit on the pricier side, it’s packed with skin-soothing elements like shea butter, sunflower seed oil, jojoba oil, green tea leaf extract, and more. One thing to note is that this lotion does feature lavender and rosemary oils for fragrance, and most artists will tell you to stay away from lotions with fragrances. However, Billy Jealousy’s fragrance comes from essential oils, so it gets an okay from me! This lotion will keep your tattoos looking fresh and clean. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: Yes | Cruelty-Free: Yes What We Like

  • Made with clean, natural ingredients
  • Smells great
  • Hydrates

What We Don’t Like

  • Small bottle

Another option that Harper suggests is Hustle Butter , a vegan alternative to traditional tattoo lotions. “It is all-natural and great for the skin, although not as accessible or cheap as the other two options,” says Harper. The product smells amazing and comes in a variety of sizes for everything from small line art to the heavy blackwork. Hustle Butter moisturizes and seals the ink to keep it looking new and feeling soft even after it’s healed. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: Yes | Cruelty-Free: Yes Courtesy of Amazon What We Like

  • Unscented
  • Contains vitamin E
  • Hydrating formula

What We Don’t Like

  • Small bottle

The last thing you want to apply to a fresh tat is something harsh, and this aftercare cream from Stories & Ink is extra gentle. Not only is it fragrance-free, paraben-free, and hypoallergenic, but it contains a soothing, fatty acid-rich blend of panthenol, bisabolol, and vitamin E meant to help calm inflammation and deeply moisturize the skin. It certainly doesn’t hurt that it’s also vegan and cruelty-free. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: Yes | Cruelty-Free: Yes Courtesy of Amazon What We Like

  • Cooling feel
  • Contains vitamin C
  • Helps with itching

What We Don’t Like

  • Can dry a little sticky

If you’ve been tattooed before, then you know that your skin doesn’t necessarily feel the greatest post-tattoo session. That’s why you’ll love this soothing, cooling gel from Mad Rabbit to gently calm and heal your freshly inked (err, punctured) skin. It contains aloe vera, a known skin soother that’s rich in antioxidants and stimulates cell regeneration, as well as reparative vitamin C and argan oil.

Active Ingredients: Aloe leaf extract, glycerin, olive oil | Skin Type: All | Size: 8 fl. Active Ingredients: Shea, mango, and aloe butters | Skin Type: All | Size: 5 fl. Active Ingredients: Glycerin, hydroxystearic/linolenic/oleic polyglycerides | Skin Type: All | Size: 2 fl.

Active Ingredients: Shea and cocoa butters | Skin Type: All | Size: 3. 4 fl. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: Yes | Cruelty-Free: Yes What We Like

  • Unscented
  • Moisturizing
  • Eco-friendly packaging

What We Don’t Like

  • Small bottle

H2Ocean Aquatat is a water-based and petroleum-free lotion that promises to create a protective skin barrier that is perfect for all skin types, including sensitive. It’s fragrance-free and anti-inflammatory, and reviews say it helps accelerate your ink’s healing period. Aquatat won’t stick to your skin, but it will leave your tat looking almost as pretty as new. Active Ingredients: Petrolatum | Skin Type: All | Size: 1. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: No | Cruelty-Free: Yes What We Like

  • Won’t clog pores
  • Helps relieve chapped, dry skin
  • No petroleum

What We Don’t Like

  • Small bottle

Having been on the market for ten years, Tattoo Goo lotion is another well-known aftercare product recommended by many artists. Rich in Panthenol (Vitamin B5), it promises to keep your ink moisturized, prevent scabbing, and speed up healing—all without clogging up your pores. Also nice? Tattoo Goo is also meant to help make colors more vivid and is dermatologist tested for your assurance. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: Yes | Cruelty-Free: Yes What We Like

  • No petroleum
  • Hydrating formula
  • Helps enhance tattoo vibrance

What We Don’t Like

  • Contains alcohol

After Inked is enriched with grape seed oil to provide an extremely moisturizing effect on your new tats. It’s a daily skin product that won’t stick to your clothes and that will naturally help your ink—both new and old—look healthier and better than ever. If you’re looking for a natural aftercare product, After Inked is non-petroleum based, paraben-free, fragrance-free, vegan, cruelty-free, and gluten-free, so you can be certain it fits your needs and still works wonders on your tattoos. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: Yes | Cruelty-Free: Yes What We Like

  • Contains pure coconut oil
  • Multipurpose product
  • Inexpensive per ounce

What We Don’t Like

  • No other special ingredients added

If you want to be certain your lotion choice is completely all-natural, consider reaching for pure coconut oil. Although it has a seemingly infinite number of uses, it’s also the perfect product for tattoo aftercare due to its reputation for treating wounds and other skin irritants. If you decide to go with coconut oil, make sure you use a clean utensil (or wear gloves) when applying to avoid exposing your ink to any potentially harmful bacteria. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: Yes | Cruelty-Free: Yes Courtesy of People of Substance What We Like

  • Convenient for travel
  • No synthetic fragrance
  • A little goes a long way

What We Don’t Like

  • Could be more hydrating

This convenient tattoo healing stick is great for healing fresh tattoos and preserving your older ones. Packed with nutrient-rich grape seed, sweet almond, and argan oils, the ultra lightweight formula promises to help soothe and heal the skin while enhancing your tattoo’s lines and color. Pop it in your bag to apply it on the go, just make sure you clean any healing tattoos first.

75 fl. Active Ingredients: Olive oil, cocoa butter | Skin Type: All | Size: 0. 75 fl. Active Ingredients: Grape seed oil, glycerin | Skin Type: All | Size: 3 fl. Active Ingredients: Coconut oil | Skin Type: All | Size: 15 fl.

Active Ingredients: Caprylic/capric triglyceride, grape seed oil | Skin Type: All | Size: 0. 5 fl. oz | SPF: None | Byrdie Clean: Yes | Cruelty-Free: Yes Courtesy of Amazon What We Like

  • Super hydrating
  • Short, simple ingredient list
  • No petroleum

What We Don’t Like

  • Expensive for a small bottle

Consider this healing balm the ultimate multitasker. It can be used to heal and soothe dry skin and lips, eczema rashes, and burns and scrapes, and also makes a great quick fix for taming flyaways and unruly eyebrows. It’s also especially nice for healing a fresh tat. The simple formula contains only castor oil and glycerin meant to help draw moisture to the skin while repairing damage, and doesn’t contain any unnecessary fillers or fragrance.

What should you not put on a new tattoo?