What Is Tattoo Ink Made Of?

What Is Tattoo Ink Made Of

The answer is you can’t be 100% certain! Did you know that there are no regulations or controls in Australia on Tattoo ink and what can or can’t be used! Whilst authorities regulate substances that you can ingest and there is regulation on cosmetics that are applied to the skin, there is no regulation on inks that are tattooed into the skin and designed to be permanent.

How many people who get a Tattoo actually ask what is in the ink? Even if you asked, would the Tattooist really be able to honestly tell you. Tattoo inks essentially consist of 2 components, the pigment and the carrier.

The pigment provides the colour of the tattoo, whilst the carrier keeps the pigment evenly mixed and makes for easier application of the tattoo pigment into the skin. Tattoo inks historically were made from ground up minerals and carbon found in the natural environment, but most modern tattoos often contain modern industrial metallic salts (eg oxides, selenides, sulphides), vegetable based pigments and plastic based pigments.

However, allergic reactions have been reported with many of the metals now commonly used in tattoo pigments, such as mercury in red ink, copper and cobalt in blue ink and cadmium in yellow ink. Plastic based inks have also become popular as they can produce very intense colours.

However plastic tattoo inks are commonly derived from Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) a type of heat resistant plastic used in appliances, pipe fittings and luggage and injecting this into your skin can not surprisingly cause significant skin allergic reactions.

Another recent trend is to use Tattoo ink pigments that glow in the dark, or in response to ultraviolet light. These inks are potentially very risky and possibly radioactive with unknown long term health effects.

In cosmetic tattooing of eyebrows and lips inorganic materials such as Titanium Dioxide are now commonly used, but these inks can be particularly difficult to remove, even with the latest lasers. Brown eyebrow or lip liner tattoos often darken and turn black and look worse with laser treatment and can be very difficult to remove.

  1. In the European Commission’s 2003 report on the health risks of tattooing, they found that many of the chemicals used in tattoos were originally intended for writing and printer inks or automobile paints, and that around 20% of coloured tattoos contained compounds considered carcinogenic (cancer causing);

Common solutions used as the carrier for tattoo pigment include ethanol, Listerine, propylene glycol and glycerine. However many other solutions have been used and continue to be used such as methanol, isopropyl alcohol, ethylene glycol (Antifreeze), formaldehyde and various detergents.

Many of these solutions are regarded as toxic, and by toxic it includes effects such as mutagenic, carcinogenic, teratogenic as well as being involved in other reactions in the body that may not show up for many years.

When alcohol is used as part of the carrier base, (or to disinfect the skin before tattooing), it can alter the skin permeability and allow even more toxic chemicals into the bloodstream as well as potentiate the effects to make these chemicals even more harmful.

  1. Whilst it might seem logical to check if someone is allergic to a particular tattoo ink by a skin test before having a tattoo, this is rarely if ever done;
  2. People getting tattoos are generally impulsive by nature and having a skin test to check if it is safe is not a consideration, just as it is not to consider if one might regret getting a particular tattoo in the future;

Even with tattoo ink ingredients that are plant based or considered safe and not toxic, it needs to be recognised that no long term studies have been conducted to confirm they are actually safe to inject permanently into the skin. From the perspective of laser tattoo removal, not knowing which substances are actually in the tattoo ink (both tattoo pigment and the tattoo carrier), as well as how much tattoo ink has been used and how deep the tattoo ink has been inserted into the skin, makes it impossible to accurately predict how many treatments might be necessary to breakdown and remove the tattoo ink.

The bottom line is that there is no regulation in Australia on what can be used in Tattoo inks and there is a recognised risk of possible allergic reactions and unknown long term side effects from many of the components now commonly used in tattoo inks.

Few people getting a tattoo stop to think they are possibly being injected with a combination of photocopier ink and Listerine or Anti Freeze!.

What is real tattoo ink made of?

What Ingredients are in Tattoo Ink? – How are tattoo inks made? Tattoo inks are solutions comprised of a carrier and a colorant. Carriers are fluids, containing liquids such as glycerin, water, isopropyl alcohol or witch hazel, that are used to transport the colorant to the injection site. What Is Tattoo Ink Made Of Colorants are typically intensely colored compounds that can reflect light in the visible region of the light spectrum. These pigments were  historically derived from mineral or geological sources. Certain hues and colors could be produced from carbon, iron oxide, and cadmium. Another compound, titanium dioxide, is the second-most-common ingredient in tattoo inks and has been found to degrade into toxic impurities.

Other carrier ingredients may contain dangerous substances like antifreeze, formaldehyde, methanol, and other aldehydes. However, this inorganic chemical, like many others, is found in sunscreen, food additives, and many other products we frequently come in contact with.

There are  more than 200 colorants and additives used to produce tattoo inks. Most standard tattoo ink colors are derived from heavy metals, including antimony, beryllium, lead, cobalt-nickel, chromium, and arsenic. Other additives include surfactants, binding agents, fillers, and preservatives.

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Is the ink in tattoos toxic?

Tattoo inks contain a wide range of chemicals and heavy metals, including some that are potentially toxic.

What is tattoo ink made of vegan?

The key difference between regular and vegan tattoo ink – According to Urban Vegan , black ink’s color is boosted with the addition of bone char, which is arguably the biggest culprit in making an ink non-vegan. Other ingredients include animal-derived glycerin, which acts as a stabilizer, and gelatin (made from connective tissue of pigs and cows) and shellac (crushed beetle shells), both of which binds inks.

A vegan ink uses carbon or logwood to create a black color, and a vegetable-based glycerin, as well as witch hazel or ethanol. For inks other than black, one tattooer in the Ask a Professional Tattoo Artist group on Facebook, the differentiating factor is which carrier or liquid companies use to bind powder pigments.

In a conversation with Michelle Livingston, owner of Arcane Body Arts in Vancouver, she explained that, with reputable ink brands, ingredients like bone char is far less common than it once was.

Is tattoo ink made from animal bones?

Tattoo Ink – The first thing vegans need to be concerned about is the tattoo ink itself. Gelatin is used as a binding agent and is perhaps the most common animal ingredient found in tattoo ink. Some inks will use shellac instead, which is derived from beetle shells.

Bone char is used in some brands of black ink to give it a darker pigmentation. Some inks also contain glycerin, which is used to stabilise the ink and provide a smooth shade. Glycerin is a tricky ingredient because it can be made from soybean or palm oil (although some vegans abstain from the latter) or derived from synthetic ingredients, but it can also be produced from tallow (rendered beef fat).

Since the source of the glycerin is rarely indicated on any products, it’s safest to avoid it altogether.

Is tattoo ink cancerous?

When it comes to cancer, black ink can be especially dangerous because it contains a very high level of benzo(a)pyrene. Benzo(a)pyrene is currently listed as a carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

Does tattoo ink affect MRI?

Tattoo Ink and MRIs – MRI machines use powerful magnets and radio waves to create detailed pictures of the soft tissues of the body, such as joints and organs. Tattoos sometimes have metal particles( like iron) in the ink, which can interact with the magnetic and radio waves of an MRI, and become irritated. While most people with tattoos won’t ever experience irritation because of an MRI, tattoos can also affect the quality of an MRI scan. Even if the tattoo does not become irritated, there still may be metal present in the ink. When being scanned, this metal causes the tattoo to show up as a black spot on the image made by the MRI machine, making it difficult, if not impossible, for the scan to show what is under that part of the skin covered by a tattoo.

Do tattoos shorten your life?

the MPR take: – Having a tattoo may mean an earlier death, says a new report in the American Journal of Clinical Pathology. Investigators compared the deaths of people with and without tattoos and found that people with tattoos appeared to die earlier than people without (mean age of death: tattooed: 39yrs; nontattooed: 53yrs).

Why do I feel sick after a tattoo?

The Composition of the Tattoo Ink – To understand why people feel sick after laser tattoo removal, you first have to understand that tattoo ink is composed of metals, metal oxides, and chemicals. What Is Tattoo Ink Made Of These metals, metal oxides, and chemicals could be poisonous/toxic to the body when they enter the blood. They may not be poisonous in the dermis, but once they enter the blood they become threats. During laser-assisted tattoo removal treatment, the tattoo ink pigments are shattered into fragments so they can be flushed out of the body. These ink fragments (which are potentially toxic, remember) linger in the blood for days or even weeks as they make their way to the kidney and liver where they are identified as toxic foreign bodies and flushed out of the system through urine or sweat.

Why are tattoos unhealthy?

Know the risks – Tattoos breach the skin, which means that skin infections and other complications are possible, including:

  • Allergic reactions. Tattoo dyes — especially red, green, yellow and blue dyes — can cause allergic skin reactions, such as an itchy rash at the tattoo site. This can occur even years after you get the tattoo.
  • Skin infections. A skin infection is possible after tattooing.
  • Other skin problems. Sometimes an area of inflammation called a granuloma can form around tattoo ink. Tattooing also can lead to keloids — raised areas caused by an overgrowth of scar tissue.
  • Bloodborne diseases. If the equipment used to create your tattoo is contaminated with infected blood, you can contract various bloodborne diseases — including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), hepatitis B and hepatitis C.
  • MRI complications. Rarely, tattoos or permanent makeup might cause swelling or burning in the affected areas during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams. In some cases, tattoo pigments can interfere with the quality of the image.

Medication or other treatment might be needed if you experience an allergic reaction to the tattoo ink or you develop an infection or other skin problem near a tattoo.

Does tattoo ink enter bloodstream?

How Long Does Tattoo Ink Stay In Your Blood? – The tattoo ink is never and will never be injected directly into the bloodstream. However, the ink is injected into the dermis when tattooing, which is the second layer of skin. This layer of skin contains tiny blood vessels that could carry some of the ink particles through the body.

Are there animal products in tattoo ink?

A tattoo can be a creative, eye-catching way to display your passion for animal rights. However, some tattoo inks are actually made with animal products. Nonvegan varieties may contain bone char, glycerin from animal fat, gelatin from hooves, or shellac from beetles.

  • So as you’re checking out tattoo shops, ask if they use vegan inks or if they can order some for you;
  • Some great vegan brands include Eternal, StarBrite, SkinCandy, and Stable Color;
  • You may also want to take along your own razor, since the ones they have in-house may have a gel strip made from glycerin;
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And of course, you’ll want your tattoo-care products to be vegan as well. Try The Merry Hempsters Vegan Hemp Tattoo Balm, Black Cat Vitamin Infusion Serum, Ohana Organics Tattoo Butter, or even jojoba oil, olive oil, or shea butter. No matter what artwork you choose, your vegan tattoo will be an animal rights conversation piece!.

What are the safest tattoo inks?

There are a bunch of new colours and tattoo techniques on offer — neons, brighter shades, memorial tats where you mix in a bit of a loved one’s ashes (don’t judge; everyone grieves differently). But how far is too far? Take a look What are the safest colours? * Neon skin inks are loaded chemicals and mercury.

The reds are perhaps the worst, because they also contain the highly toxic iron oxide and cadmium. * If you really want to get a permanent tattoo, stick with the basics. Black remains safest. Blue and green inks with copper phthalocyanine pigments are safe too.

Some parlous mix their own inks; it’s generally safest to use branded inks that list their ingredients, says Dr Amit Karkhanis, laser and cosmetic physician. Are there any natural alternatives? * Some tattoo studios have yellows and blues that are turmeric- and indigo-based. Stick with the basics. Black remains safest. Blue and green inks with copper phthalocyanine pigments are safe too. (Shutterstock) Be cautious and plan well * Skin tone is important when planning a tattoo. Because melanin acts as a filter, bright colours such as reds, sky blues and yellows won’t look as you expect them to, says Ritopriyo Saha, founder of the Trippink tattoo studio in Bengaluru.

There are other colours that are naturally derived, but also many that make false claim, so always check the contents. * A good tag to look for is EU certification. Inks that say they are compliant with EU quality standards will have the lowest levels of toxicity possible.

* For dark skin tones, black and most shades of green work well. * Even if it’s not your first tattoo, do a patch test. Tattoo inks change; skin tones change. Take nothing for granted. * If there even a tiny chance that you will want the tattoo removed later on, avoid reds, yellows and oranges.

They are the most resistant to laser removal treatments. Even for the other colours, removal takes an average of 15 visits over 8 weeks. Best and worst spots * Muscular parts of the body — upper arms, calves, back — are good places if you plan to get a tattoo, says Dr Karkhanis.

* Avoid areas where the skin stretches such as the crease lines on the wrist, elbows or near the knees. “It will likely take longer to heal as there is constant pulling of the skin here,” he adds. * Avoid hands and feet. Sustained and direct exposure to sun, soap and water would make healing difficult and could cause the tattoo to fade.

Do vegan tattoos last?

There are a lot of questions about tattoo fading. Just as Long as Regular Ink Some people have raised concerns about vegan tattoo ink fading more rapidly than regular ink. However, this is a myth. Vegan ink lasts just as long as regular ink. The reason why tattoos fade is because they’re either exposed to the sun, or are in an area that requires frequent exfoliating, or the tattoos are applied with subpar ink.

It is unavoidable that tattoos, both in color and black, will fade over time. Of course, the pattern on the skin can brighten, especially for colored tattoos. This process takes place on average 5-6 years after application.

Sometimes the tattoos stay perfect for 10 years. The speed of fading of the pattern is related to the natural renewal of the skin. How quickly the tattoo will fade depends on the pigments used, the place of drawing, and the type of skin. For the longest time, their saturation is maintained by dark colors: black, blue, and also red and brown.

Tattoos made in yellow, orange, and also any pale colors fade faster. Most tattoo inks will fade over time but never fade away completely. Depending on where your tattoos are located changes in your body such as weight gain, weight loss and muscle gain can affect the appearance of your tattoos.

Tattoos on the hands, wrists, feet, ankles and back of the neck will be minimally affected by weight loss. While a tattoo stays with you for life, all tattoos experience some fading over time. You can slow the fading of your tattoo by practicing good aftercare, like protecting your tattoo from the sun with a plant-based sunscreen.

  • From a strictly “vegan vs;
  • conventional” standpoint, plant-based inks do not fade any faster than traditional inks with animal products;
  • The longevity of your tattoo will come down to the choices you make about it;

When a tattoo reaches a particular age, there is no amount of exfoliating gel that can liven it back up. This is when a consultation with a talented tattoo artist could be the answer. Your fossil of a tattoo could be re-outlined again with a solid, crisp black line.

  • This would enhance the clarity of the tattoo design by redefining the tattoo design elements;
  • It would also give the tattoo artist the opportunity to add some further detail back into the faded tattoo again;

In particular, areas of the design that are small and complex have lost their detail because the ink has spread. Tattoo designs that have faces or symbols in them, highly benefit from some touch-up work. The colors in a tattoo are usually the first area of the tattoo to show wear. What is the most important thing someone can do to keep their tattoo looking great?

  • Keep them out of the sun. It’s the same thing with any skin condition. It’s just like if you put a painting out in the sun, sooner or later it’s going to fade a bit. The same thing happens to a tattoo – especially the lighter colors, the sun will attack them.
  • Get into the habit of applying a thin layer of moisturizer to your tattoo. No matter which lotion or cream you use, apply it sparingly. A thick layer of moisturizer can leach color out of your tattoo.
  • In addition to how you care for it afterward, the phrase “you get what you pay for” is never truer than in the tattooing world. If you take your time to find an experienced artist and are willing to pay for the best quality you can afford, you’ll find your tattoo stays more vibrant for longer than if you try to cut corners with cheap inks. Your tattoo will only give what you put into it!
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To read more articles and interesting facts about tattoos, please visit this page ..

Is tattoo ink FDA approved?

Some risks, such as the spread of infections through the use of unsterilized needles, have long been known. But what isn’t clear is the safety of tattoo inks. No tattoo ink pigments have been FDA approved.

Is vegan tattoo ink toxic?

Vegan Ink Safety – Talking about vegan ink without considering things like safety would be wrong. So, let’s tackle this as well. Now, considering that animal-derived ingredients are not to be found in vegan ink, one would consider it significantly safer than regular ink.

  1. Remember how we mention that standard ink contains toxic chemicals and heavy metals? Well, those things can cause some serious health issues, like tattoo and skin infection, allergic reaction, fever, and so much more;

So, is vegan ink safer than regular ink in this sense? Well, vegan ink has only animal-derived ingredients replaced. The other ingredients, which give it pigment and other ink characteristics, remain the same as in regular ink. So, unfortunately, vegan ink can still contain things like toxic chemicals and heavy metals.

  • Therefore, vegan ink isn’t necessarily safer than regular ink;
  • Some studies have shown that both regular and vegan ink can still cause adverse side effects and generally contain carcinogenic chemicals, like cadmium, found in red ink;

These chemicals can cause autoimmune diseases alongside infections and allergic reactions, as well as lead to cancer development. The only way you can ensure that the tattoo process goes well and safe is to get tattooed by a professional, reputable tattoo artist.

By going to the best tattooist in your area, you’re minimizing the chance of anything going wrong. Professional tattooists pay strict attention to cleanliness, hygiene (personal and that of the studio), as well as high-quality products.

So, when you’re looking for a tattoo artist, always go for the best. Also, make sure to talk to your tattoo artist about the ink they use. If they do not use vegan ink, discuss your options. Chances are they will order vegan ink for you. But, we recommend it is best to simply find a vegan tattoo artist from the get-go..

What animal products are in tattoo ink?

Which tattoo ink is safest?

There are a bunch of new colours and tattoo techniques on offer — neons, brighter shades, memorial tats where you mix in a bit of a loved one’s ashes (don’t judge; everyone grieves differently). But how far is too far? Take a look What are the safest colours? * Neon skin inks are loaded chemicals and mercury.

The reds are perhaps the worst, because they also contain the highly toxic iron oxide and cadmium. * If you really want to get a permanent tattoo, stick with the basics. Black remains safest. Blue and green inks with copper phthalocyanine pigments are safe too.

Some parlous mix their own inks; it’s generally safest to use branded inks that list their ingredients, says Dr Amit Karkhanis, laser and cosmetic physician. Are there any natural alternatives? * Some tattoo studios have yellows and blues that are turmeric- and indigo-based. Stick with the basics. Black remains safest. Blue and green inks with copper phthalocyanine pigments are safe too. (Shutterstock) Be cautious and plan well * Skin tone is important when planning a tattoo. Because melanin acts as a filter, bright colours such as reds, sky blues and yellows won’t look as you expect them to, says Ritopriyo Saha, founder of the Trippink tattoo studio in Bengaluru.

  • There are other colours that are naturally derived, but also many that make false claim, so always check the contents;
  • * A good tag to look for is EU certification;
  • Inks that say they are compliant with EU quality standards will have the lowest levels of toxicity possible;

* For dark skin tones, black and most shades of green work well. * Even if it’s not your first tattoo, do a patch test. Tattoo inks change; skin tones change. Take nothing for granted. * If there even a tiny chance that you will want the tattoo removed later on, avoid reds, yellows and oranges.

They are the most resistant to laser removal treatments. Even for the other colours, removal takes an average of 15 visits over 8 weeks. Best and worst spots * Muscular parts of the body — upper arms, calves, back — are good places if you plan to get a tattoo, says Dr Karkhanis.

* Avoid areas where the skin stretches such as the crease lines on the wrist, elbows or near the knees. “It will likely take longer to heal as there is constant pulling of the skin here,” he adds. * Avoid hands and feet. Sustained and direct exposure to sun, soap and water would make healing difficult and could cause the tattoo to fade.

Do all tattoo inks have metal in them?

Tattoo inks may also contain potentially harmful metal impurities such as chromium, nickel, copper, and cobalt. Tattoo pigments themselves can be health hazards. ‘If the ink is really bright in color, it usually contains dangerous stuff,’ tattoo artist Bergström said.

How do you make homemade tattoo ink?