If You Get A Tattoo While Pregnant What Will Happen?

If You Get A Tattoo While Pregnant What Will Happen
Risks Associated with Getting Tattooed While Pregnant – There are some known risks of getting a tattoo , and some of those risks can cause major complications in pregnant women. You should be aware of these risks before deciding to get a tattoo while pregnant.

  • Infection;
  • One of the main risks of being tattooed is the chance of an infection;
  • If your tattoo artist uses contaminated or dirty needles, you could be at risk of getting bloodborne infections, such as hepatitis B;

A mother with hepatitis B can easily pass on the infection to her baby at birth. Babies with hepatitis B have a 90% chance of developing a lifelong infection, and one in four of them will die of health complications from the infection if it is left untreated.

  1. Other bloodborne infections, like hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), can also be contracted from unsterile tattoo needles;
  2. There is a 6% chance of a mother with hepatitis C passing on the infection to her child;

Without treatment, the chance of a mother with HIV passing on the infection to her child can range from 15% to 45%. Toxic tattoo inks. Even though the average tattoo needle is only poked ⅛ of an inch into the skin, some tattoo ink contains heavy metals like mercury, arsenic, and lead.

  • These ingredients can pose a threat to your developing baby, particularly in the first trimester when the main organs are developing;
  • Exposure to heavy metals can affect your baby’s brain development;
  • It can also increase your chances of having a miscarriage or stillbirth;

Skin changes during pregnancy. When you are pregnant, your body is constantly growing and changing to accommodate the baby inside. Depending on where you get a tattoo, your ink might not look the same after you’ve given birth and your body has healed. Your skin can change in other ways as well.

Melasma , or temporary darkening of the skin, and increased skin sensitivity is common in pregnancy and can affect how your tattoo looks or how you react to being tattooed. Inability to receive epidurals.

You’ve probably heard the rumor that women with a lower back tattoo can’t get an epidural, but there is little evidence to support this claim. Complications of getting an epidural with a lower back tattoo are rare. In some cases, a lower back tattoo may cause problems.

If your tattoo appears to have red, scaly skin or is infected, leaking fluid, or still healing, your doctor would likely not give you an epidural. Calm any anxiety you might have on this topic by talking to your doctor.

They’re the best person to guide you through this process.

Can you get a tattoo if you’re pregnant?

Safety of Getting Inked During Pregnancy – There are plenty of valid reasons you may want to get a tattoo during pregnancy. Maybe you’d like to commemorate this special time in your life with a permanent physical reminder. Or perhaps you had planned to get a tat, only to be surprised by a positive pregnancy test.

  1. But is it safe to go ahead with a baby in your belly? Possibly—but doing so comes with significant risks;
  2. According to the American Pregnancy Association , the biggest concern about getting a tattoo during pregnancy is the risk of contracting an infection, like hepatitis B or HIV;
You might be interested:  What Does A Butterfly Tattoo Mean?

Hepatitis B is a serious liver infection that can not only make you very ill, but can also be transmitted to your baby at birth. Ninety percent of babies who contract hepatitis B develop lifelong, chronic infection. One in four children with untreated, chronic hepatitis will eventually die of related health problems.

Likewise, HIV transmits from mother to child in about 15 to 45% of cases. This virus compromises the immune system and can cause failure to thrive in children. Another potential issue is an adverse reaction to the contents in the tattoo needle.

“We know that some people respond to the dyes and the metals in the tattoo dye and can have allergic reactions or infections,” said OB/GYN Lauren Demosthenes, MD, Senior Medical Director at Babyscripts. “We would hate for you to have to deal with an infection or allergic reaction while pregnant.

Does tattoo cause birth defects?

In 2005, a California judge ruled that two major tattoo ink makers – Huck Spaulding Enterprises and Superior Tattoo Equipment – must include a label on their products warning California customers the ink contains heavy metals that could cause ‘cancer, birth defects and reproductive harm’.

Can getting a tattoo cause a miscarriage?

Risks Associated with Getting Tattooed While Pregnant – There are some known risks of getting a tattoo , and some of those risks can cause major complications in pregnant women. You should be aware of these risks before deciding to get a tattoo while pregnant.

  • Infection;
  • One of the main risks of being tattooed is the chance of an infection;
  • If your tattoo artist uses contaminated or dirty needles, you could be at risk of getting bloodborne infections, such as hepatitis B;

A mother with hepatitis B can easily pass on the infection to her baby at birth. Babies with hepatitis B have a 90% chance of developing a lifelong infection, and one in four of them will die of health complications from the infection if it is left untreated.

  • Other bloodborne infections, like hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), can also be contracted from unsterile tattoo needles;
  • There is a 6% chance of a mother with hepatitis C passing on the infection to her child;

Without treatment, the chance of a mother with HIV passing on the infection to her child can range from 15% to 45%. Toxic tattoo inks. Even though the average tattoo needle is only poked ⅛ of an inch into the skin, some tattoo ink contains heavy metals like mercury, arsenic, and lead.

  1. These ingredients can pose a threat to your developing baby, particularly in the first trimester when the main organs are developing;
  2. Exposure to heavy metals can affect your baby’s brain development;
  3. It can also increase your chances of having a miscarriage or stillbirth;

Skin changes during pregnancy. When you are pregnant, your body is constantly growing and changing to accommodate the baby inside. Depending on where you get a tattoo, your ink might not look the same after you’ve given birth and your body has healed. Your skin can change in other ways as well.

  1. Melasma , or temporary darkening of the skin, and increased skin sensitivity is common in pregnancy and can affect how your tattoo looks or how you react to being tattooed;
  2. Inability to receive epidurals;

You’ve probably heard the rumor that women with a lower back tattoo can’t get an epidural, but there is little evidence to support this claim. Complications of getting an epidural with a lower back tattoo are rare. In some cases, a lower back tattoo may cause problems.

You might be interested:  What Does A Rabbit Tattoo Mean?

If your tattoo appears to have red, scaly skin or is infected, leaking fluid, or still healing, your doctor would likely not give you an epidural. Calm any anxiety you might have on this topic by talking to your doctor.

They’re the best person to guide you through this process.

Can I get a tattoo at 4 weeks pregnant?

Tattoos are more popular than ever, and people get them to celebrate a relationship, commemorate a goal, or just because they like the look of colorful body art. But what about when you’re expecting—is it safe for a woman to get a tattoo while pregnant? We spoke to a dermatologist to learn the facts about getting inked during pregnancy.

  1. The short answer is yes, you can get a tattoo when you’re pregnant;
  2. But it isn’t risk-free;
  3. “Although you can get a tattoo safely while pregnant, there is [the] potential to contract an infection if the tattoo is not done under sterile or clean conditions,” Rachel Nazarian, MD, a New York-based dermatologist and Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology, tells Health;

Two serious infections that can be transmitted by tattoo needles are hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Both viruses are spread through blood, so if infected blood is left on a tattoo needle and the needle isn’t properly cleaned before it pierces your skin, you could become infected with one of these serious diseases.

Another blood-borne infection that might be transmitted by a needle is HIV. The Centers for Disease Control states that there are no known cases of anyone in the United States contracting HIV through a tattoo needle.

Still, it is technically possible—if the needle hasn’t been properly sterilized and was used on someone who has HIV. Not only could you become infected with HIV, but the fetus is in danger of this virus as well, adds Dr. Nazarian. HIV and hepatitis B and C aren’t the only health risks.

  1. Dr;
  2. Nazarian says that though rare, it’s possible to have a contact allergy to the ingredients in the tattoo ink;
  3. “The ink from a tattoo cannot reach the fetus, so it’s not directly dangerous,” she explains;

“But a secondary issue can arise, such as infection or allergy, which can complicate the pregnancy unnecessarily. ” Dr. Nazarian adds that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a potentially lethal bacterial infection that is resistant to many antibiotics, can strike anytime skin is broken, posing another risk to you and your baby.

  • Many people “naturally have MRSA on their bodies,” says Dr;
  • Nazarian;
  • While getting a tattoo, “these people could have the bacteria introduced into or under their skin and the infection can spread—either on themselves or even to other people if the same needle is not cleaned and is reused;

” The licensing standards and regulatory requirements for tattoo artists and parlors vary by region, so it’s best to research the regulations in your city or state and then only get a tattoo from a reputable studio with trained artists. Make sure the tattoo artist sterilizes the needles before using them on you, the Mayo Clinic recommends, and also check that all tattoo pigments and other equipment have not been used before.

Finally, the tattoo artist should also wear latex gloves to prevent the spread of bacteria. Ultimately, the best thing you can do is to hold off until after your pregnancy to get a tattoo. “There’s no need to obtain a tattoo urgently and to risk complicating your pregnancy,” advises Dr.

Nazarian. “I would urge women to wait until afterward: Safety first. ” To get more stories on sex, pregnancy, and everything in between, sign up for the Healthy Living newsletter ..

You might be interested:  How To Make Tattoo Ink?

When should you not get a tattoo?

Blood Disorders – If You Get A Tattoo While Pregnant What Will Happen There are several different types of blood related disorders or conditions. Some of them cause excessive bleeding or issues with clotting, which is not ideal for tattooing. Those with blood disorders may be turned away by shops due to the risks and issues posed by being tattooed. Blood disorders could lessen the artists visibility, extra wiping could cause the stencil to come off early compromising the design, and even dilute or push out some of the tattoo ink.

Do tattoos affect fertility?

Will an existing tattoo cause problems during pregnancy? – No, having a tattoo that’s already healed shouldn’t cause any problems for you or your baby during pregnancy. You may find that your tattoo changes while you’re pregnant, though. Chloasma (brown pigmentation that happens during pregnancy) can affect the color of a tattoo, for example.

Is black tattoo ink toxic?

While there is no direct connection between tattoos and skin cancer, there are some ingredients in tattoo ink that may be linked to cancer. When it comes to cancer, black ink can be especially dangerous because it contains a very high level of benzo(a)pyrene.

Can I get a tattoo while 7 weeks pregnant?

Final Thoughts – While you may have an urgent desire to get inked while pregnant, medical experts and tattoo artists alike agree the best thing to do for you and your unborn baby is to wait until after you’ve given birth. Tattoos are supposed to be a fun way to express yourself, but getting tattooed while pregnant has the potential to do harm—and that’s not fun at all.

  • “Tattoos are an optional cosmetic treatment with potential risks that are better to avoid, especially when pregnant,” reinforces Sperling;
  • Fiore echoes these sentiments and urges expectant mothers to simply wait until after their pregnancy ends to ensure their immune system is operating at 100 percent and the risk of harm is significantly reduced or even erased;

“You’re compromising your immune system, putting your body through physical and environmental stress, and—as with any tattoo—[you] run the risk of infection if aftercare isn’t practiced properly,” notes Fiore. “Just wait. The tattoo will be there forever, [but] you have one shot at delivering a healthy, happy child!”.

Can hair be dyed during pregnancy?

Is it safe to dye your hair while pregnant? – The short answer is yes… with some caveats. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, coloring your hair while pregnant is highly unlikely to be toxic to your fetus [1]. Animal studies show that even high doses of the chemicals in hair dye do not cause birth defects.

Another reassuring finding: your scalp absorbs only small amounts of these chemicals. Still, you may wish to postpone your next color appointment until you’re in the second trimester. That’s because so much development is happening during those first 13 weeks: the baby’s brain and spinal cord develop, their heart begins to beat, and their overall body structure begins to come together.

This period of time is the most important for fetal growth, so many experts recommend minimizing chemical exposure—just to reduce risk. If you’re concerned, ask your obstetrician for guidance or wait until you’re into the second trimester. (Your roots won’t be that bad!).

What u should not do when pregnant?