How To Think Of Tattoo Ideas?

How To Think Of Tattoo Ideas
Getting tattooed can be pretty addictive. Trust us, we know. It starts off as just one meaningful tattoo on your wrist, then suddenly you blink and you’re 6 months into a backpiece. If you’re someone who’s a fan of tattoos and wants to get another one, it can be difficult to stay inspired when coming up with designs.

  • Artists are often quizzed on where they get their inspiration for designs, and it’s something that tattoo clients have to think about, too;
  • Where can you find inspiration for your next tattoo design? And how can you make sure that it’s something unique and special? That’s what we’re going to be talking about today;

In this blog post, we’re going to be looking at the best ways to find inspiration for a tattoo. Before we get started, it’s worth noting that there aren’t any set rules for what you can get. You don’t have to get a super meaningful tattoo every time, and you don’t have to have a particular complexion to get a bright and colorful tattoo, for example.

  • As long as you work with a good artist and get something that makes you happy, that’s all that matters;
  • Consider whether it’s going to have any meaning Before you think about styles or artists, try to think about your reason for getting a tattoo as this will affect how it looks overall;

Are you getting a tattoo to commemorate a loved one? Is it a birthday present to yourself? Or are you simply getting it just because you want to? All of these reasons are equally valid, and it may even be a combination of multiple reasons. Whatever your logic, establish the meaning first and then you can figure out whether a particular style or symbol would be useful for you. The styles that we would recommend looking into to begin with are;

  • American traditional. This is one of the styles that our shop specializes in. They’re simplistic and bold, with vibrant colors and old-school themes.
  • Neo traditional. An elaboration on traditional tattoos, these tattoos are often bright and colorful, with intricate linework and a plethora of themes.
  • Japanese. Japanese tattooing is famed for having beautiful iconography, deep symbolism and a vibrant history to match.
  • New school. These tattoos are loud and bold, with an instantly recognizable drawing style and color palette.
  • Realism. As the name suggests, realistic tattoos capture a photographic essence of real life. They can be colorful, or they look equally stunning in black and grey.

This list is by no means exhaustive, and there are plenty of other ones to choose from. Have a read about some styles, it will be a very helpful task for inspiring you and narrowing down your artistic interests. Have a think about the style, size and placement Where is it that you want to get tattooed, and how big do you want it to be? These are questions that your artist will ask you, so it will be beneficial for you to have a solid answer ready.

  • Look up some different tattoo styles and genres As you’ve probably seen from our other blog posts, there are countless styles of tattoos- with more emerging each year;
  • Do you want a black and grey neo Japanese leg piece? How about a gray wash neo noir portrait? There are so many different styles that it’s important to look in to them, to help discern what your own personal tastes are;

Size and placement are much more important than you might think. They affect a number of factors, such as design intricacy, session lengths and even pain control techniques. Take a look at your favorite books, movies and video games Pop culture and media can be huge inspirations for tattoos.

Do you have a favorite comic book character, for example? How about a favorite movie scene? Ideas like these can make fantastic tattoo designs, as they can fit a number of styles and be a lot of fun too.

Search for inspiration on social media Social media can be a wonderful place to go if you’re searching for inspiration. A lot of artists will post their flash designs and previous work on social media platforms like Instagram, and Pinterest can be a very helpful place to look as well.

  1. One important thing to note is that while it’s okay to use other pieces for inspiration , it’s not okay to just use another person’s design;
  2. It’s disrespectful to the original artist, the person who is wearing it and to your artists own capabilities and skill set;

Ripping off other designs is never ok- tattoos should be custom. Get a consultation with your artist Any good studio will offer consultations, and this is a service that you should take full advantage of. Working with an artist during a consultation will help take any concepts and turn them into fully-fledged designs.

  1. Overall As you can see, there are plenty of great places to draw inspiration from for tattoos;
  2. Whether you’re getting a piece that’s deeply symbolic, inspired by your favorite arist or simply just for a laugh, speaking to your artist and getting a consultation will always be beneficial;

If you’re not sure about your idea, why not wait a while? We’d suggest giving it a month if you want to think about it; after all, it’s better to be sure when you’re heading into any sort of body modification or adornment. There’s no harm in waiting a while, and it can give you some extra peace of mind when you’re heading to your appointment.

  1. If you’re looking for a high quality, custom tattoo in the New York area, you need to come and see us at NYC Tattoo Shop;
  2. Our team has a wealth of experience, and can work with you to help make your dream tattoo a reality;

Take a look at the rest of our website to see what we could do for you, and feel free to get in touch with us to find out more today..

How do I decide what tattoo to get?

How do you think your tattoo is meaningful?

Consider What’s Meaningful to You – Once you know where you want to get your tattoo, it’s time to think about the visual elements you want involved. Christine V. suggests you keep in mind “what… you actually want in your tattoo, what personal meaning will it carry?” She advises against getting too literal with your design if, at all possible, “Sometimes it is good to consider more metaphorical symbolism, and not just go with a literal theme or idea.

Being a bit more subtle and symbolic will yield a more personal and unique tattoo”. Christine D. , another artist at CTD, believes that if you’re looking into getting a custom design, you already have some kind of inspiration in mind – even if you don’t consciously know it yet, “…it is pretty rare for someone to simply get a custom tattoo designed ‘just because’… There is always a trigger for the desire [to get] a tattoo”.

She goes on to explain: When someone seeks an unique design, made just for them, it is a sign that there is something very special that they feel connected to, and that they need to make it a visible part of themselves, but…the person [doesn’t always have] a clear picture of what they want, sometimes what they have is just a feeling.

  1. And how to put a feeling into paper? Which is where working with an artist comes into play;
  2. “A tattoo is always more than a piece of artwork, it is an inspiration”, says Christine D;
  3. , so she encourages potential clients to think about what inspires them, whether it be music, art, someone special in your life, or a symbol to represent your own personality and experience;

Jen also recommends you think about what’s meaningful to you, because tattoos are “such a personal form of self-expression”, you could take inspiration from: one of your favorite places, animals, flowers, people you want to celebrate or remember, significant moments in your life, hobbies or media you enjoy, your heritage, mythology that resonates with you, or any symbolism that you feel connected to.

If you can’t decide on just one theme, don’t worry, Jen says, “tattoos… don’t necessarily need to have one driving theme in order to be a beautiful piece of art. If you are having trouble focusing on one theme, you can always incorporate several themes and elements into your tattoo”.

There a few different techniques that an artist could use to do this, like, “we can use filler elements (like clouds, waves, flowers, etc. ) to tie all the elements together into a cohesive whole, or just draw everything in a specific tattoo style which will unite all the disparate elements”.

Tattooist and CTD artist Andy W. echoes the idea of going with something personal, “so that it will mean something for the rest of your life”. He would not, however, advise going with a spouse’s name, “Personally, I think a partner’s name is a bit risky, as anything could happen”.

But that person can be inspiration for a symbol that represents your relationship , and make for a unique and lasting tattoo. There’s a ton of room for creativity and expression through art when you’re coming up with a tattoo design idea, but choosing something that is meaningful to you personally increases the chances that you’ll be happy with the tattoo in the long-term, as opposed to getting a trendy, ‘current’ design done..

How do you see if a tattoo looks good on you?

One way to really test out a look on your body is to book an appointment with the tattoo artist you are considering for a trial tattoo. It may cost you if you are spending a significant amount of time, so check with your artist of choice how they would like to proceed.

How can I communicate with my tattoo idea?

Do tattoos make you hotter?

In a study, women rated tattooed men as healthier but not more attractive than men without tattoos. Men viewed tattooed men as more attractive but not healthier than men without tattoos. Women judged men with tattoos as worse potential parents and partners than men without tattoos.

What is a good first tattoo?

While upper arms, forearms, thighs, and calves are all great locations, Brodsky says elbow and knee tattooing can be ‘kind of spicy, but it’s still doable. ‘ Tattoos on the torso hurt worse, she explains, because the skin is softer and lighter.

Will I regret getting a tattoo?

It’s not unusual for a person to change their mind after getting a tattoo. In fact, one survey says 75 percent of their 600 respondents admitted to regretting at least one of their tattoos. But the good news is there are things you can do before and after getting a tattoo to lower your chances of regret.

What tattoo spots hurt most?

What makes a tattoo design good?

We get asked all the time for good tattoo designs and tattoo ideas  and, like our collection of beautiful tattoos last week, sometimes that just depends on your perspective of what “good” actually means. But there are, definitely, some things that make certain designs work extremely well.

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and with this selection of pieces, we hope to show you what to look for when you’re planning out your next tattoo, or working with your favorite artist to design your next custom tattoo. It always starts with an inspiring idea.

and we’re sure we’ve got you covered there. but what next? How do you create something that stands out? How do you go from the idea to the visual representation? Well. read on to find out. Good tattoo designs are based on a whole lot of things. You obviously want to make sure that the concept is strong.

even if that means you’re simply doing a nod to Traditional or Tribal. And, usually, if you feel really strongly about your idea, then that makes the rest of the process so much easier to depict a powerful piece.

But there are also a few others things that your tattoo artist can help with when designing something that you’ll not only love forever, but that will look seriously cool ten, twenty, or even fifty, years from now. For instance, take Traditional tattoos.

part of the reason why they’re so popular, and why they continue to be a mainstay of the tattoo community, is that the old saying “bold will hold” is 100% true. The bold black lines, striking color palette, and simplicity of these artful conceptions helps create a powerful tattoo that heals well, and ages even better.

You’ll notice that with the examples in this collection, like Pablo Lillo’s portrait of a wine loving lady, and Andres’ illustration of the devil and his conquest, that the lines are wonderfully capture the image, but also leave a lot of room for what are known as “skin breaks”.

room for the skin to show through. This helps with image recognition, and as the tattoo ages, it makes sure that the piece will remain clear and easily legible. If you look at all the other tattoos, they also have this aspect: the lines aren’t squashed together.

size actually does matter when creating a design, and your artist will tell you if your idea may need a bit more room to wander. In addition to choosing the correct size to depict your idea, balance is totally key. You’ll notice that every single piece in this good tattoo design collection, no matter the style, is balanced.

It’s not only parts of the image that are in harmony. the tattoo itself also needs to be a good fit for where it is placed on the body. Check out Pawel Indulski ‘s moon lady. the placement of the crescent moons helps create a cohesive vision.

It doesn’t feel like it’s missing something. The same goes for Oscar Akermo ‘s tattoo. even though the forearm is not a rectangle, that shape works really well on that part of the body. He even fit it around other pieces in a way that makes the space used, and the space around the tattoo, in harmony.

So, it’s not just size, line quality, balance, or space. it’s everything put together that makes a tattoo design really stand out. Look at the rest of these pieces, and try to figure out what makes it such a successful design (even if it isn’t your particular fave style).

It’s okay if you’re not super artistic, or if this isn’t your forte. because that’s why some tattoo artists are so freaking good at their job!! They are there to give you the tattoo of your dreams. and all of this artsy fartsy design info comes to them like a second nature.

Is there a tattoo design app?

INKHUNTER- try tattoo designs – How To Think Of Tattoo Ideas Inkhunter is one of the top free tattoo design apps one could use on smartphones due to its skill of augmenting reality. This technology has made designing tattoos an exciting experience because you can see how it appears on your skin before getting permanently inked. Artist will highly benefit from using this app on their android or iOS smartphones due to the amazing interface and reassurance they can provide to their customers.

Inkhunter has a wide variety of free tattoo designs that can be easily accessed by the user. One can also get creative and can design your own tattoo virtually on any portion of the body to check how it looks before visiting a tattooist.

Another awesome AR feature is that you’ll be able to view the tattoo exactly how it should appear on human skin, and from all the angles. This can save you from a bad tattoo decision while showing you the best possible placement for your ink. This makes it very easy for you to edit a photo with a tattoo of your choice to show to the tattooist before you get started.

  1. Rather than becoming the victim of unfortunate tattoo ideas, the app can inspire you to get creative and use their tattoo ideas for free;
  2. We found Inkhunter to be the best for the same reasons, except that their pop-up ads are a bit of an inconvenience;

However, given the free app, that’s something we can easily overlook. Download: INKHUNTER  Android  Apps Now!!.

Is there a tattoo app?

MediBang Paint – If you’re looking for a free app to draw and design your tattoos, then MediBang Paint is the one for you. Initially created as a comic creation app, MediBang is a great graphic app that you can use to design a tattoo for yourself or your clients. It offers multiplatform support and is available for Android, iOS devices (iPhone and iPad), Windows, and macOS.

Did I mention that it’s free? You can use the app to draw and paint gorgeous tattoos. Start a design on your PC, then take it over to your iPad or Android tablet with ease. You can use it to import photos to help create or design a photo tattoo.

MediBang also has a network of users that you can share your work with when you create an account. That’s a great way to get your work out there, besides the traditional social media route. While the app does have ads, they don’t disrupt the creative process.

How painful is a tattoo?

How bad do tattoos hurt? – There’s no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to how much pain you’ll feel when getting tattooed. But if you’re wondering what type of pain to expect, Caranfa says the experience is comparable to the feeling of a cat scratch or a sunburn.

  • “Long periods of irritation and tenderness are what make you feel any discomfort,” Caranfa says;
  • “The sensation of a tattoo needle is very dull compared to a syringe [and needle], it isn’t the needle that causes discomfort as much as it is prolonged tenderness of being tattooed;

” Importantly, different people will report varying experiences of pain based on their individual nervous systems and pain thresholds , says Channelle Charest , a California-based tattoo artist and Co-founder of tattoo scheduling platform Tatstat. Other factors that could affect pain during tattooing include:

  • Age: Studies suggest aging decreases your pain sensitivity , meaning elderly people might experience less pain when getting tattooed. Researchers have yet to determine why this happens but note that the size of parts of the brain that process pain decreases with age.
  • Sex: People who are biologically female are more likely to experience greater pain intensity, a lower pain threshold, and a lower tolerance for induced pain compared to people who are biologically male. However, research is still emerging.
  • Psychological expectations : If you go into a tattoo expecting it to be an excruciating experience, this might affect how much pain you actually feel. Studies suggest that people who feel anxious about and “catastrophize” pain before a procedure often experience higher levels of pain intensity and distress than people with “neutral” pain expectations.

Fortunately, most of the discomfort you feel while getting tattooed will end when your tattoo artist puts down the tattoo gun. “The sensation is only when the needle is in you,” Caranfa says, adding that while it’s typical to experience some soreness, swelling, and itchiness in the days after getting tattooed, it’s “not debilitating.

Is it rude to show a tattoo artist another tattoo?

The Best Way To Come Up With A Unique Tattoo Idea | That You Wont Regret!

Let the artist take lead on the design Most tattoo artists are in fact artists. They want to tattoo you with their own art. This isn’t just a creative preference. Tattooers generally have perfected a certain style (or styles). Their best designs and their best execution will be in this style(s). They want to be confident and and proud of your tattoo.

  • Don’t send them a picture of another artist’s work and say “I want this tattoo”.
  • Don’t be surprised if the artist does not want to tattoo in a style that is not their own.
  • Do share reference images for the subject matter you like.
  • Do share reference images from the artist’s own portfolio and say “I like the style you used here. “

Be as specific as you need to be. Not more or less. Artists love it when you give them creative freedom but don’t do it unless you really do want them to make all creative decisions. If you have something specific in mind, tell them.

  • Don’t tell the artist “you have complete freedom” and then come to the shop and make a lot of corrections.
  • Do tell the artist any specifics you have in mind before they work on the design!

New tattoos are always a better option than “adding on” to, or modifying an existing tattoos. Most artists would rather not work with another artist’s tattoo. It adds constraints to their design potential and it forces them to either: (a) Vandalize an existing, nice tattoo or (b) Have their work seen alongside an existing ugly tattoo. Either way, this won’t be a portfolio piece and won’t get the best work from the artist.

That’s not possible if you give excessive direction or if you force the artist outside of their core styles. Also, remember that good artists won’t copy another artist’s design so don’t ask. Consider: do you really need your existing tattoo to keep growing and becoming more and more of a Frankenstein’s Monster? Or can you offer new real estate to each artist? Cover-ups are a different story.

If you need a cover-up, you need a coverup. Not all artists are technically capable of good cover-ups and not all artists like to do them because of the additional constraint but it’s always worth asking.

  • Don’t think of your tattoo as a house you are continually remodelling.
  • Do think of tattoos more like paintings you are commissioning. Give the artist a clean canvas.
  • Do consider going back to the same artist for modifying or touching up an existing tattoo.

Don’t design by committee There’s nothing worse than customers who bring an opinionated friend or loved one to “help” them with design decisions. You hired the artist to help you with design. Adding a third party can complicate the already-delicate balance of artist/client in the design process. The more opinions you solicit, the harder and more confusing the process will be. Only you know what you want and the artist can help you.

  • Don’t bring a friend or spouse to speak for you.
  • Don’t text photos of the design to friends asking for their opinion.
  • Do tell your opinionated friends to quiet down if they become too involved in your tattoo design process.

Limit your party to yourself + 1 max Speaking of bringing others with you… consider visiting the shop alone for your appointment. Most shops are limited in their space and cannot accommodate your friends. Not only that, your friends might think it sounds fun to be at the shop while you get tattooed, but it’s not. Your friends will be bored.

  • Don’t bring extra people with you to be tattooed without asking the shop first. Most shops don’t want your friends sleeping in the waiting area while you get tattooed.
  • Do limit your party to just you or one other if you must and encourage your friends to go do something while you get tattooed so they don’t sleep in the waiting area.
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Let the artist concentrate while you get tattooed Even the most experienced artists need to limit stressors during their tattooing. Tattooing requires intense concentration. Some artists love to gab while tattooing but others prefer to be quiet. Let the artist take the lead or ask them what they prefer.

  • Do bring a book to read or movie to watch provided you can do it without moving.
  • Do let your artist take the lead on whether or not to talk.
  • Don’t stare at the tattoo while your artist is working. This is stressful.
  • Don’t talk too much unless your artit is the chatty one.

Sit still! For obvious reasons, you never want to move while there is a tattoo needle inking your skin. If you might have trouble with pain, consider a numbing cream in advance of getting tattooed (ask your artist first). If you’re jumpy, you’re wasting tattooing time and risking mistakes. Generally though, you’re stressing out the artist which can mean not getting their best work.

  • Don’t move unexpectedly.
  • Don’t talk if you’re getting your ribs tattooed.
  • Do let the artist know if you need to move or stretch.
  • Do let the artist know If you think the furniture can be adjusted to be more comfortable.
  • Do consider topical numbing cream in advance of your tattoo if you’re worried about tolerating the pain (ask the artist first though)

Tipping It is customary to tip tattoo artists just like (in the US) it is customary to tip restaurant wait staff. Because it’s customary, not tipping is seen as a sign of being dissatisfied with your tattoo.

  • Do expect to tip when budgeting for your tattoo.
  • Do tip the artist directly and in cash.
  • Do tip big (e. 20%+) if you love your tattoo.
  • Do talk to your artist whenever you feel something isn’t being handled well (consultation, design, etc). A small tip (or no tip) shouldn’t be the only sign that you are dissatisfied.

Aftercare There are many different aftercare procedures out there. Always follow the artist’s own aftercare instructions because you and the artist are both responsible for the quality of your tattoo.

  • Do make sure to get precise instructions for aftercare from your artist.
  • Do feel OK to ask questions during the healing process if something seems wrong.
  • Do a little research about healing tattoos to know what’s normal. Scabbing is normal. Ink on the bandage is normal. Looking faded in the first couple of weeks is normal.

Touch-ups Most tattoos will not need touching up — at least for many years. However, sometimes ink does fall out or fade. This can happen for many reasons. The artist’s tattoo technique matters but it’s just half the story. Healing/fading is also affected by aftercare, your biology, the placement on the body (bendy parts like wrists, elbows, fingers, etc will fade more and faster).

  • Do wait 30 days before even considering a touch-up. Tattoos can look less-than-perfect while healing and need 30 days to be completely healed.
  • Do take good care of your tattoo following artist instructions and avoiding any strong sun exposure, rubbing, or soaking of the tattoo area while it’s healing.
  • Don’t expect the tattoo ink to look as vibrant as it did the day of your tattoo. Tattoo ink sits under the top layer of skin so, once healed, you’ll be looking at the ink through the top layer of skin.
  • Don’t be confrontational with the artist about your touch-up. Your artist cares as much as you do about the tattoo looking great so there’s no reason to take an aggressive posture if you have concerns about your tattoo.

What should you not ask a tattoo artist?

Is it rude to wear headphones while getting a tattoo?

Conclusion – The tattoo process is a personal thing and what’s acceptable will vary depending on your tattoo artist. Make sure that you speak to them to understand what they expect and what is acceptable during the procedure. You need to be comfortable but so do they.

Where did Billie Eilish get her tattoo?

She got her second tattoo, a massive black dragon on her right thigh, in November 2020. – Billie Eilish photographed by Craig McDean for British Vogue. Craig McDean/Vogue Fans first caught a glimpse of Eilish’s thigh tattoo in a photo shoot with British Vogue , published in May 2021, though she told Rolling Stone that she got it six months prior. The ink made its first public appearance at the 2021 Met Gala, where Eilish wore an Oscar de la Renta gown with a thigh-high slit.

What does having tattoos say about a person?

Author:  Sophia Carter – Institution:  Whitworth University ABSTRACT Research supports personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals. However, few studies have investigated whether any of these differences are associated with positive indicators for tattooed individuals.

In this study, personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals in three of the Big Five personality areas considered critical to successful employees in the workforce were examined.

Previous research has established that higher levels of conscientiousness and extraversion coupled with lower levels of neuroticism are indicators of high-quality employees. The present study attempts to augment this line of research by adding the dimension of tattoos; investigating whether individuals with tattoos report more positive personality indicators in these dimensions than individuals without tattoos.

Thus it was hypothesized that tattooed individuals would report higher levels of conscientiousness and extraversion and lower levels of neuroticism than non-tattooed individuals. For this purpose,  N  = 521 individuals completed an online survey, which included the 44-Question Big Five Inventory.

An independent sample t -test revealed a statistically significant difference between tattooed ( M  = 3. 41,  SD  = 0. 77) and non-tattooed ( M  = 3. 21,  SD  = 0. 83) groups in the Big Five personality area of extraversion,  t  (521) = 0. 39,  p  =. 004,  d  = 0.

25. There were no other statistically significant differences. These findings indicate that tattooed individuals may be better employees than previously believed, as the extraversion component of the Big Five Inventory, has been found to be a critical indicator of successful job performance.

INTRODUCTION Tattoos have increased in popularity over the last two decades; almost one in five people across all age groups had a tattoo as of 2012, and one in ten people have two or more tattoos (Swami et al. , 2012). Nearly 40% of young adults (18-25) have at least one tattoo, whereas only 15-16% of members of this age group in 1990 were tattooed (Swami et al.

, 2012). Despite the increase in tattoos within younger generations, tattooed individuals face discrimination, negative stigma, and lower levels of employment than their non-tattooed counterparts (Horne, Knox, Zusman, & Zusman, 2007).

Very little research has examined whether individuals with tattoos score differently than non-tattooed individuals on scales measuring personality traits perceived as positive. This study seeks to address this gap by identifying personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals and the potential implications of those differences for employment.

Historically, the traits associated with tattooed individuals have depended significantly on the culture and circumstances of those individuals. Captain Cook explored Polynesia in 1769 and observed the social and spiritual significance of tattoos in Polynesian culture.

The location of a tattoo on an individual’s body and the specific tattoo design displayed social, hierarchal, and genealogical information about the owner of the tattoo, as well as signaling particular aspects of his or her character (Parry, 1933). Tattooing was considered a sacred ceremony, and most tattoos were thought to fetch spiritual power, protection, and strength.

Almost every Polynesian individual had tattoos, and many of Captain Cook’s men left their voyage with a permanent memento of their expedition, which was considered a great honor (Parry, 1933). Similarly, Native Americans report a long and extensive history of traditional tattoos.

Depending on the tribe, tattoos could signal hierarchy or a specific role within the tribe, mark a warrior’s prowess in battle, or be considered marks of beauty (Littell, 2003). Since then, through the shift towards Western culture and through changing definitions of art, tattoos have become more associated with criminals and the sexually promiscuous (Wohlrab, Fink, & Kappeler, 2005).

  • Recent studies have shown there are still many stereotypes attached to individuals with tattoos: academic struggle, broken homes, traumatic childhoods, rarely or never attending church, poor decision-making skills, and susceptibility to peer pressure (Roberts & Ryan, 2002);

However, these stereotypes may not accurately represent the current tattoo climate. Forty percent of 26 to 40-year-olds now have a tattoo, closely followed by 36% of 18 to 25-year-olds (Swami et al. , 2012). The rising popularity of tattoos among young to middle aged individuals suggests that tattoos may hold different significance sociologically, biologically, and socially than they have throughout the previous century (Wohlrab et al.

, 2005). Research is mixed on whether the negative stereotypes associated with tattoos are accurate. A study completed in 2007 in Germany evaluating tattooed and non-tattooed individuals using a Big Five Personality Inventory found that tattooed individuals scored higher on the subscale of extraversion, and lower on the subscale of neuroticism (Wohlrab, 2007).

More recently, a 2012 study of 540 individuals from Austria and Germany examined Big Five personality traits in participants, as well as a need for uniqueness, sensation seeking, self-esteem, religious and spiritual belief, and demographic variables. The researchers in this study concluded that not only do those with tattoos have higher levels of need for uniqueness, sensation seeking, and thrill and adventure seeking, but they have lower levels of self-esteem, attend religious services less, and are generally much less educated than individuals who did not have tattoos (Swami et al.

, 2012). For decades, businesses have attempted to identify personality traits that predict a successful employee. When United States federal law banned the use of polygraphs for employee selection in 1988, hirers began using personality surveys as the primary method for making hiring decisions (Stabile, 2013).

Job interviewers now ask questions designed to reveal components of an individual’s personality in order to evaluate where that individual would best fit within the company structure, how committed to the job the individual would be, and their likelihood of advancing through the company ranks (Wohlrab, 2007).

However, studies as late as 2010 have shown that despite this shift to personality-based hiring, companies still discard potential employees on the basis of their tattoos (Burgess, & Clark 2010). Researchers have also attempted to determine personality traits capable of predicting successful employees.

A 2014 ten-year longitudinal study of over 8,000 individuals working within multiple big business companies revealed that there is a significant statistical difference between the managerial and working classes in three Big Five personality dimensions: neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness (Palaiou & Furnham, 2014).

  • Conscientiousness was shown to be the best predictor of overall successful job performance and individuals who scored higher in this dimension tended to be more achievement oriented (Li, Barrick, Zimmerman, & Chiabaru, 2014);

Neuroticism successfully predicted poor work performance; the lower the levels of neuroticism, the higher the level of performance from the employee (Barrick, Mount, & Judge, 2001). Finally, higher levels of extraversion were linked to higher levels of task performance and proactivity (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

  1. This study attempts to augment the area of research pertaining to tattooed individuals’ personality traits by investigating whether tattooed individuals differ significantly when compared to their non-tattooed peers in areas related to successful employee traits;

It was hypothesized that tattooed individuals would score higher in conscientiousness and extraversion and lower in neuroticism as measured by the Big Five Inventory. MATERIALS AND METHODS Participants Participants were recruited through a campus-wide e-mail at Whitworth University, Facebook psychology groups, and global online psychology research forums.

  1. Participation was entirely voluntary, and participants could complete the study on their own time at their own pace;
  2. 521 individuals completed the survey, 411 females and 110 males, aged from 18 to 62 years old;
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Materials Participants completed an online version of the 44-Question Big Five Inventory (John, Donahue, & Kentle, 1991) followed by basic demographic questions addressing age, sex, education level, and university affiliation of the participant. Participants were also asked if they had any tattoos.

  1. Participants with tattoos were asked to indicate the size and location of those tattoos;
  2. The survey measured the Big Five areas of personality: openness to experience, neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, and agreeableness;

For example, questions measuring conscientiousness asked the participant to rate statements such as: “I am someone who does a thorough job” or “I am a reliable worker” on a five-point Likert scale. Items measuring neuroticism stated, “I am someone who remains calm in tense situations” and “I am someone who is emotionally stable, not easily upset”.

Finally, items related to extraversion included statements such as “I am someone who is talkative” and “I am someone who is full of energy” (John et al. , 1991). Participants were asked to rate their agreement with a series of such statements on a five-point Likert on a scale of one (“strongly disagreeing”) to five (“strongly agreeing”).

The Big Five Inventory has scored between 0. 73 – 0. 82 on Cronbach’s alpha test over the course of its development, giving it a high degree of internal consistency and thus, reliability (Schmitt et al. , 2007). The survey contained nine questions regarding conscientiousness, eight questions regarding neuroticism, and eight questions regarding extraversion.

The three personality subscales of conscientiousness, extraversion, and neuroticism were scored using a formula that calculated a numerical value for each personality dimension by adding each individual’s selected scores on the Likert scale, which were then averaged between all participants for an overall mean.

RESULTS A total of N  =521 individuals completed the survey. Of that 521, 411 were female and 110 were male. Participant age varied from 18 to 68 years old. Participants were current students or alumni from 54 universities of various sizes in both rural and urban locations throughout the United States.

Two hundred sixty-six (51%) identified themselves as having no tattoos and two hundred fifty-five (49%) identified themselves as having tattoos. A two-tailed independent sample t -test revealed no statistically significant difference in levels of conscientiousness between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals ( p  =.

30; Figure 1). Like conscientiousness, a two-tailed independent sample t-test revealed no statistically significance difference on the neuroticism personality scale between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals ( p  =. 53; Figure 1). Results revealed a statistically significant result regarding extraversion.

  • A two-tailed independent sample t-test revealed a statistically significance difference between tattooed individuals ( M  = 3;
  • 41,  SD  = 0;
  • 77) and non-tattooed individuals ( M  = 3;
  • 21,  SD  = 0;
  • 83,  p  =;

004; Figure 1). DISCUSSION The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there were positive traits associated with individuals who have tattoos. It was proposed that tattooed individuals would score higher on the conscientiousness and extraversion domains and lower on the neuroticism domain as measured by the Big Five Inventory than their non-tattooed peers.

Tattooed individuals scored significantly higher in extraversion than their non-tattooed peers, but there were no significant differences in conscientiousness or neuroticism between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals.

Though tattooed individuals did not differ significantly in two of the three areas tested in this study, the significant difference in extraversion suggests that those individuals with one or more tattoos may display higher levels of task performance and proactivity in the business world (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

  • A growing body of literature suggests tattooed individuals display different personality traits than their non-tattooed counterparts, and this study lends further support to this hypothesis;
  • Specifically, the present study supports the findings from several other studies that tattooed individuals consistently score higher in extraversion than their non-tattooed peers (e;

, Stirn, Hinz, & Brahler, 2006; Swami, 2012; Swami et al. , 2012 Wohlrab, Stahl, Rammsayer, & Kappeler, 2007). This study may be limited by the high proportion of female participants ( n  = 411) compared to and male participants n  = 110). A study in which males and females are equally represented could be better extrapolated to the general public.

  1. However, a similar study, performed in 2012 with 45;
  2. 6% male participants found very similar results to the present study; tattooed individuals scored significantly higher than non-tattooed individuals in extraversion, but did not score differently in any of the other Big Five personality dimensions (Swami et al;

, 2012). Future research should be conducted with a more age-diverse sample, as the present study had a mean age of 24. 47 years old. Though this study lends itself well to explaining the personality attributes of the younger generation, it does not shed any light onto the baby boomer generation, who are currently the individuals holding CEO, managerial, and most importantly, hiring positions over the younger population (Odgers Berndtson, 2012).

Over the next decade, a mass exodus of baby boomers is expected to occur, leaving open positions for the younger generation (Odgers Berndtson, 2012). However, if baby boomers are still utilizing stigmatized hiring criteria regarding tattoos, they are excluding a class of individuals who are more proactive and task performance oriented than their age-matched peers (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

Gathering more research regarding generational differences in personality attributes and attitudes towards tattoos may have the potential to change current hiring criteria. Additionally, examining the final two personality domains (agreeableness and openness to experience) in the Big Five Inventory may lead to further information regarding the relationship between tattoos and personality, which could divulge more information regarding desirable characteristics in employees.

Agreeableness has been correlated with success in several specific job fields, such as those that require considerable interpersonal interaction. Similarly, the openness to experience dimension has predicted success in fields where teamwork and training performance are important (Barrick et al.

, 2001). Finally, associations between tattoos and personality could be further explored by examining whether the effect is binary (tattoo vs. non-tattoo) or a gradient (influenced by the quantity of tattoos). Tattooing has rapidly become a prevalent phenomenon in western culture.

  • It may therefore be time to reexamine the stigma attached to hiring tattooed individuals;
  • Extraversion, which indicates higher levels of task performance and proactivity in a job setting (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006), is starting, through recent research, to become associated with tattooed individuals;

The business industry stands to gain quality employees who may be well suited to long-term success and significant contributions to the company if hiring criteria regarding tattoos were to be reassessed (Sackett, Burris, & Ryan, 1989). REFERENCES

  1. Barrick, M. , Mount, M. , & Judge, T. (2001). Personality and performance at the beginning of the new millennium. What do we know and where do we go next? International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 9 , 9-30.
  2. Burgess, M. , & Clark, L. (2010). Do the “savage origins” of tattoos cast a prejudicial shadow on contemporary tattooed individuals? Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 40 , 746-764.
  3. Horne, J. , Knox, D. , Zusman, J. , and Zusman, M. (2007) Tattoos and piercings: Attitudes, behaviours, and interpretations of college students. College Student Journal, 41 , 1011-1020.
  4. John, O. , Donahue, E. , & Kentle, R. (1991). The Big Five Inventory–Versions 4a and 54. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley, Institute of Personality and Social Research.
  5. Li, N. , Barrick, M. , Zimmerman, R. , & Chiabaru, D. (2014). Retaining the productive employee: The role of personality. The Academy of Management Annals, 8 , 347-395.
  6. Littell, A. (2003). The illustrated self: Construction of meaning through tattoo images and their narratives (Doctoral Dissertation). Retrieved from Proquest database. (Order No. AAI3077541).
  7. Odgers Berndtson. (2012). After the Baby Boomers: A Next Generation of Leadership [Brochure]. London: England, Cass Business School.
  8. Palaiou, K. & Furnham, A. (2014). Are bosses unique? Personality facet differences between CEOs and staff in five work sectors. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 66 , 173-196.
  9. Parry, A. (1933). Tattoo; Secrets of a strange art as practiced among the natives of the United States. Madison, WI: Simon and Schuster.
  10. Pearsall, M. , & Ellis, A. (2006). The effects of critical team member assertiveness on team performance and satisfaction. Journal of Management, 32 , 575-594.
  11. Roberts, T. , & Ryan, S. (2002). Tattooing and high risk behavior in adolescents. Pediatrics, 110 , 1058-1063.
  12. Sackett PR, Burris LR, Ryan AM. (1989). Coaching and practice effects in personnel selection. In Coo per CL, Robertson IT (Eds. ), International review of industrial and organizational psychology (pp. 145–183). New York: Wiley.
  13. Schmitt, D. , Allik, J. , McCrae, R. , Benet-Martínez, V. , Alcalay, L. , & Ault, L. (2007). The geographic distribution of Big Five personality traits: Patterns and profiles of human self-description across 56 nations. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 38 , 173–212.
  14. Stabile, S. (2013). The use of personality tests as a hiring tool: Is the benefit worth the cost?. University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business Law, 4 , 279-288.
  15. Stirn, A. , Hinz, A. , & Brahler, E. (2006). Prevalence of tattooing and body piercing in Germany and perception of health, mental disorders, and sensation seeking among tattooed and body-pierced individuals. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 60 , 531-534
  16. Swami, V. (2012). Written on the body? Individual differences between British adults who do and do not obtain a first tattoo. Scandinavian Journal Of Psychology, 53 , 407-412.
  17. Swami, V. , Pietschnig, J. , Bertl, B. , Nader, I. , Stieger, S. , & Voracek, M. (2012). Personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals. Psychological Reports, 111 , 97-106.
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Should I lose weight before getting a tattoo?

How Weight Gain Affects Tattoos – Only in cases of extreme weight loss or weight gain will you see a noticeable difference in a tattoo design, says celebrity tattoo artist Dillon Forte: “Weight change has virtually no effect on the tattoo unless the weight gain or loss is like 100 pounds.

  1. With drastic weight gain it needs to be enough to cause stretch marks, which in turn will impact your tattoo;
  2. ” Similar to weight loss, weight gain can affect the placement and size of the tattoo design;

During pregnancy, tattoos located directly on the body’s midsection are susceptible to change due to the rate at which the skin expands. While stretch marks can alter an existing tattoo design, the effects of the marks depend on each individual’s specific design and placement.

If you decide to touch up the area later on, seek out a tattoo artist who specializes in the area, as this skin texture can prove tricky to work with. Working out and toning your muscles shouldn’t affect your tattoo at all, but if heavy weightlifting is in fact your thing, significant muscle gain could morph the shape.

The better the placement of the tattoo in relationship to the muscle, the less chance of it changing. If you’re concerned about this before getting the tattoo (maybe you’re planning to make some lifestyle changes), discuss it with your tattoo artist.

What’s the most common tattoo?

Hearts are also a common tattoo request. – Kapowski said customers often ask for small tattoos of hearts. Amanda Edwards/WireImage/Getty Images Hearts are a simple and universally popular tattoo design that can symbolize love or simply make for fun body art. Kapowski told Insider that people are often interested in getting hearts inked on their hip or behind their ears.