How To Set Up A Tattoo Appointment?

How To Set Up A Tattoo Appointment

Booking a tattoo appointment, in theory, seems easy. But in fact, the process can be very intricate. If you’re not careful, and especially if you haven’t been through the process before, wrongdoings at the time of the booking can go on to cause catastrophic consequences for you and your tattoo by the end of the process. You can book a tattoo appointment by:

  • Going through the website booking point
  • Emailing an artist directly
  • Calling the studio or artist
  • Walking in

What to say to book a tattoo?

Step 4. How to message a tattoo artist when booking an appointment? – The question we get asked the most is: How to message a tattoo artist when booking an appointment? And we promise messaging a tattoo artist when booking an appointment doesn’t have to be full of anxiety. Our advice is pretty simple, just like your message should be! What to email a tattoo artist when booking an appointment:

  • A simple description of your idea and any photo references you may have.
  • The size and body part you’d like to have tattooed, as well as your budget.
  • Any particular style, colors, details, and similar, that you’d like included.
  • Dates that work well for you.

How To Set Up A Tattoo Appointment The best thing to keep in mind when you ask yourself how to message a tattoo artist is: be straight-forward and polite. Keep it short but make sure to include all of the information above plus anything else you think may be relevant. What if I’m unsure about the size or the placement? If you’re unsure about the size or placement of the tattoo, that’s okay! Just say so! But we’re pretty sure you probably have an estimate in mind. Let the artist work their magic with you! How To Set Up A Tattoo Appointment We totally understand why so many people are confused about how to email a tattoo artist. It’s not always obvious how a tattooist wants to be contacted, and a lot of people don’t really know what to say anyway! And what if it’s not clear how to book? Maybe their profile doesn’t have a “Book Now” button, or they don’t have a bio specifying how they want to be contacted.

if you don’t, that’s also okay. The tattoo artist will work with you to figure out a size and a placement for your piece that will work perfectly. It’s part of their job. The same goes for if you’re unsure about colors, design, style, etc.

If it’s an artist, try to find their email. Keep it short and brief, like: “Hey, I found you on Tattoodo, but I wasn’t sure how to book a tattoo with you. Please let me know what you prefer, and what information you’d like to have. ” The same goes for a shop that doesn’t have contact info.

  • If you can’t find the shop email, feel free to give the shop a call — phone calls are great;
  • Simply say, “Hey, I found you on Tattoodo;
  • I’d like to book a new tattoo;
  • ” Again, the key is to be clear, and to the point;

Many shops don’t have a shop manager to handle calls, so an artist is probably taking time away from drawing or tattooing to help you. Have your schedule ready to confirm a date, and make sure to write down anything else you’re told. How To Set Up A Tattoo Appointment What if you have the artist’s email, Instagram, Facebook or phone number? Unless you have a special relationship with that tattoo artist or that person is a dear friend, following the rules will make you the best client you can be. And we assume if you’re reading this: that’s exactly what you should do. Tattoo artists’ schedules are whacky and busy, keeping track of multiple forms of communication is exhausting for anybody. By going through the right motions, you ensure you’re on the calendar properly, and it will help everyone out in the long run. How To Set Up A Tattoo Appointment.

How early should you show up for a tattoo appointment?

– If you’ve made it this far into our guide, it’s safe to say that you have all your bases covered. To wrap things up, here’s how your interaction with your artist and getting your tattoo done will likely unfold:

  1. Reach out to the artist or shop to talk about rates and set up a consultation.
  2. Meet the artist to talk about your design and expectations.
  3. Agree upon the final design with the artist and confirm the rate. If revisions are needed, this may involve setting up a follow-up appointment to look over the final design before locking in your tattoo date.
  4. Aspirin (Bayer) and ibuprofen (Advil) are off limits in the 24 hours leading up to your appointment, as they can thin your blood. This applies to the consumption of alcohol as well. You may be able to take acetaminophen (Tylenol), but confirm this with your artist beforehand.
  5. Plan to wear something that will keep the area to be tattooed exposed. If you can’t do this, wear something you can easily slip in and out of.
  6. Show up to your appointment 10 minutes early. Don’t forget to bring cash for tips!
  7. Fill out any paperwork and, if needed, finalize any details of your design.
  8. Your artist will take you to their station. You may need to roll up or remove any clothing that may be in the way of your tattoo placement.
  9. Your artist will disinfect the area and use a disposable razor to remove any hair.
  10. Then your artist will place the tattoo stencil onto your skin. Move this around as much as you like until you’re happy with the placement!
  11. Once the placement is perfect, your artist will tattoo the outline of your design before filling in any colors or gradients.
  12. After your artist is finished, they’ll clean the tattooed area, wrap it up, and tell you how to take care of it.
  13. Don’t forget to leave a tip for your artist when you pay! It’s standard to tip at least 20 percent, but if you had an awesome experience and are able to tip more, go ahead.
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If you have any lingering questions, ask before you leave the shop. One of the best times to get them answered is when your artist is wrapping your skin. Since you’re here, screenshot or print out this handy list of questions for your consultation before you commit to an artist.

Where should a first timer get a tattoo?

What are the steps of getting a tattoo?

What should you not say to a tattoo artist?

Why are tattoo artists so rude?

Conclusion – It could be that the tattoo artist that you go to see is having a bad day or has been treated badly by another customer. There could be lots of reasons why they seem to be being rude towards you. However, it could just be their way and they don’t mean anything by the abrupt way they speak to people.

How Much Should U tip a tattoo artist?

How Much to Tip Tattoo Artists – Unfortunately, there’s no hard and fast rule governing how much to tip tattoo artists. As with tipping waitstaff, 20-25% percent is a good standard. An easy way to include tipping in your budget is to add it in when getting the estimated costs for having your work done.

  1. So, if your tattoo is expected to cost $200, with a 20-percent tip, that’s $240;
  2. That said, you can tip more or less, depending on several factors;
  3. For one thing, your willingness to tip will depend on how pleased you are with their work;

If you don’t like the work, it makes sense that you would want to tip less. That’s up to you. But keep in mind that a tattoo is a piece of art you wear on your body for personal expression. The tattoo artist makes your vision a reality on your skin. Choosing the right tattoo artist is as important as choosing the right tattoo.

Do your research, first. Don’t be afraid to ask people with great ink where they got it done. Chances are they’d love to tell you about their tattoo artist and the experiences they had with them. Another reason you might tip less or choose not to tip at all is because of a bad experience.

But, like any service-based industry, it’s not just the artist’s attitude that’s a big deal. You want to be treated with dignity and respect, but so does your tattoo artist. Tipping is a part of that, but so is showing up on time and being ready for your appointment.

  • In most instances, tipping is appropriate and encouraged;
  • While you can tip less than 15%, try to avoid it;
  • Good work should be recognized, and being broke is no excuse not to tip;
  • If you don’t have the money to tip your artist, rethink getting tattooed until you can;

Or, ask your artist if they’d be interested in being tipped in goods or services if you run your own business and can float a sweet freebie their way in lieu of cash. Tipping in cash is fine. That way your tattoo artist gets the entirety of the tip and avoids any service fees or taxes.

If adding your tip to a credit or debit transaction, add a bit more to cover those fees. The best time to tip is after your appointment when you’re paying for your services. If your tattoo artist isn’t the person checking you out, just hit them up afterward with a thank you and, “This is for you.

” They’ll appreciate it. Remember, you’re tipping them based on their professionalism and the quality of their work, so there’s nothing wrong with waiting to make sure you’re pleased with the experience before you tip. You also don’t need to let your tattooer know you’re tipping, but it’s not a bad idea.

That way they know you didn’t accidentally overpay them or think they owe you change. In some rare instances, a tattooer might not accept tips if they’re the owner of the shop, but that’s very unlikely to be the case.

There’s no reason to ask your artist about tipping if you plan on tipping them with cash. And, most credit card interfaces offer prompts for adding tips as part of the check-out process, making it even easier. Gratuities are part of the tattoo experience so don’t feel awkward or uncomfortable about them. How To Set Up A Tattoo Appointment.

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What is tattoo etiquette?

Let the artist take lead on the design Most tattoo artists are in fact artists. They want to tattoo you with their own art. This isn’t just a creative preference. Tattooers generally have perfected a certain style (or styles). Their best designs and their best execution will be in this style(s). They want to be confident and and proud of your tattoo.

  • Don’t send them a picture of another artist’s work and say “I want this tattoo”.
  • Don’t be surprised if the artist does not want to tattoo in a style that is not their own.
  • Do share reference images for the subject matter you like.
  • Do share reference images from the artist’s own portfolio and say “I like the style you used here. “

Be as specific as you need to be. Not more or less. Artists love it when you give them creative freedom but don’t do it unless you really do want them to make all creative decisions. If you have something specific in mind, tell them.

  • Don’t tell the artist “you have complete freedom” and then come to the shop and make a lot of corrections.
  • Do tell the artist any specifics you have in mind before they work on the design!

New tattoos are always a better option than “adding on” to, or modifying an existing tattoos. Most artists would rather not work with another artist’s tattoo. It adds constraints to their design potential and it forces them to either: (a) Vandalize an existing, nice tattoo or (b) Have their work seen alongside an existing ugly tattoo. Either way, this won’t be a portfolio piece and won’t get the best work from the artist.

That’s not possible if you give excessive direction or if you force the artist outside of their core styles. Also, remember that good artists won’t copy another artist’s design so don’t ask. Consider: do you really need your existing tattoo to keep growing and becoming more and more of a Frankenstein’s Monster? Or can you offer new real estate to each artist? Cover-ups are a different story.

If you need a cover-up, you need a coverup. Not all artists are technically capable of good cover-ups and not all artists like to do them because of the additional constraint but it’s always worth asking.

  • Don’t think of your tattoo as a house you are continually remodelling.
  • Do think of tattoos more like paintings you are commissioning. Give the artist a clean canvas.
  • Do consider going back to the same artist for modifying or touching up an existing tattoo.

Don’t design by committee There’s nothing worse than customers who bring an opinionated friend or loved one to “help” them with design decisions. You hired the artist to help you with design. Adding a third party can complicate the already-delicate balance of artist/client in the design process. The more opinions you solicit, the harder and more confusing the process will be. Only you know what you want and the artist can help you.

  • Don’t bring a friend or spouse to speak for you.
  • Don’t text photos of the design to friends asking for their opinion.
  • Do tell your opinionated friends to quiet down if they become too involved in your tattoo design process.

Limit your party to yourself + 1 max Speaking of bringing others with you… consider visiting the shop alone for your appointment. Most shops are limited in their space and cannot accommodate your friends. Not only that, your friends might think it sounds fun to be at the shop while you get tattooed, but it’s not. Your friends will be bored.

  • Don’t bring extra people with you to be tattooed without asking the shop first. Most shops don’t want your friends sleeping in the waiting area while you get tattooed.
  • Do limit your party to just you or one other if you must and encourage your friends to go do something while you get tattooed so they don’t sleep in the waiting area.

Let the artist concentrate while you get tattooed Even the most experienced artists need to limit stressors during their tattooing. Tattooing requires intense concentration. Some artists love to gab while tattooing but others prefer to be quiet. Let the artist take the lead or ask them what they prefer.

  • Do bring a book to read or movie to watch provided you can do it without moving.
  • Do let your artist take the lead on whether or not to talk.
  • Don’t stare at the tattoo while your artist is working. This is stressful.
  • Don’t talk too much unless your artit is the chatty one.

Sit still! For obvious reasons, you never want to move while there is a tattoo needle inking your skin. If you might have trouble with pain, consider a numbing cream in advance of getting tattooed (ask your artist first). If you’re jumpy, you’re wasting tattooing time and risking mistakes. Generally though, you’re stressing out the artist which can mean not getting their best work.

  • Don’t move unexpectedly.
  • Don’t talk if you’re getting your ribs tattooed.
  • Do let the artist know if you need to move or stretch.
  • Do let the artist know If you think the furniture can be adjusted to be more comfortable.
  • Do consider topical numbing cream in advance of your tattoo if you’re worried about tolerating the pain (ask the artist first though)
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Tipping It is customary to tip tattoo artists just like (in the US) it is customary to tip restaurant wait staff. Because it’s customary, not tipping is seen as a sign of being dissatisfied with your tattoo.

  • Do expect to tip when budgeting for your tattoo.
  • Do tip the artist directly and in cash.
  • Do tip big (e. 20%+) if you love your tattoo.
  • Do talk to your artist whenever you feel something isn’t being handled well (consultation, design, etc). A small tip (or no tip) shouldn’t be the only sign that you are dissatisfied.

Aftercare There are many different aftercare procedures out there. Always follow the artist’s own aftercare instructions because you and the artist are both responsible for the quality of your tattoo.

  • Do make sure to get precise instructions for aftercare from your artist.
  • Do feel OK to ask questions during the healing process if something seems wrong.
  • Do a little research about healing tattoos to know what’s normal. Scabbing is normal. Ink on the bandage is normal. Looking faded in the first couple of weeks is normal.

Touch-ups Most tattoos will not need touching up — at least for many years. However, sometimes ink does fall out or fade. This can happen for many reasons. The artist’s tattoo technique matters but it’s just half the story. Healing/fading is also affected by aftercare, your biology, the placement on the body (bendy parts like wrists, elbows, fingers, etc will fade more and faster).

  • Do wait 30 days before even considering a touch-up. Tattoos can look less-than-perfect while healing and need 30 days to be completely healed.
  • Do take good care of your tattoo following artist instructions and avoiding any strong sun exposure, rubbing, or soaking of the tattoo area while it’s healing.
  • Don’t expect the tattoo ink to look as vibrant as it did the day of your tattoo. Tattoo ink sits under the top layer of skin so, once healed, you’ll be looking at the ink through the top layer of skin.
  • Don’t be confrontational with the artist about your touch-up. Your artist cares as much as you do about the tattoo looking great so there’s no reason to take an aggressive posture if you have concerns about your tattoo.

Can you tip tattoo artist on card?

When Should You Tip a Tattoo Artist? – Tipping a tattoo artist is recommended after the tattoo is complete. This can be as soon as your artist wraps up your tattoo and before you pay, or after you pay at the shop counter. Most tattoo shops will not accept credit-card tips for tattoos, so make sure to be prepared for your tattoo appointment and have a cash tip on hand. How To Set Up A Tattoo Appointment.

What’s the least painful spot to get a tattoo?

Least painful to tattoo – The least painful places to get a tattoo are areas of your body with fewer nerve endings. Think outer shoulder, calf, buttocks, and outer arm. While people generally focus on the location on the body, Stanley Kovak , a cosmetic physician, theorizes that pain is more about size.

What should you not do before getting a tattoo?

Can you shower after a tattoo?

The bottom line. Showering with a new tattoo isn’t only fine; it’s necessary for the sake of good hygiene. As long as you follow the aftercare instructions your tattoo artist gives you, and you’re careful not to rub or soak your tattoo, showering shouldn’t interfere with the healing process of your new ink.

Is it okay to cry during a tattoo?

‘ can be very painful, so a little crying is OK. ‘ Hall also noted that some clients cry during a tattoo session for emotional reasons. ‘Crying happens from time to time, but I find that it’s most often connected to an emotional release rather than physical pain,’ he said.

How much do you tip on an 800 dollar tattoo?

The Takeaway – Tipping may not be mandatory, but it’s a way to show that you appreciate all of the hard work and effort—physical and monetary—that your artist put into your new tattoo. Remember: A tip isn’t about you, it’s about the artist. If your artist made your tattoo experience good, great, or amazing, a tip is a sincere way to show your gratitude.

Plus, it helps their business out in the long-run. “When you show your artist you’re grateful for their work, it helps them create and share more artwork with the world—which, at the end of the day, is what it’s all really about!” says Fiore.

The best rule of thumb you can follow is to tip at least 20 percent of the total cost of your service, and tip even more for custom, intricate designs. It’s the human thing to do..

What should you not eat after tattoo?

How do you ask a tattoo artist?

Is it rude to ask the cost of a tattoo?

Many artists find it extremely rude if you try to haggle the price of a tattoo. Though negotiating the price of some goods and services is normal, haggling with your artist over the cost of a tattoo is typically seen as unacceptable and insulting.

What do you say when tattoo artist asks your budget?

Tell your artist what you can afford, and together you can create a design and a timeline that works for both of you. Spreading the cost across multiple sessions will not only help the tattoo to heal well, but you’ll also avoid spending a large sum of money all at one time.

How do I get a quote tattoo?

How to Properly Book a Tattoo Appointment! // missalannanielsen