How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get?

How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get
How to Decide Which Tattoo to Get

  1. Ask yourself why you want a tattoo in the first place.
  2. Consider the tattoo’s effect in the workplace or other scenarios.
  3. Choose your design carefully.
  4. Think about where you want it.
  5. Choose your tattoo’s color(s) wisely.
  6. Create your own design.
  7. Choose an artist.

How do I decide what tattoo to get?

How do you see if a tattoo looks good on you?

One way to really test out a look on your body is to book an appointment with the tattoo artist you are considering for a trial tattoo. It may cost you if you are spending a significant amount of time, so check with your artist of choice how they would like to proceed.

What is a good first tattoo?

While upper arms, forearms, thighs, and calves are all great locations, Brodsky says elbow and knee tattooing can be ‘kind of spicy, but it’s still doable. ‘ Tattoos on the torso hurt worse, she explains, because the skin is softer and lighter.

How do you think your tattoo is meaningful?

Consider What’s Meaningful to You – Once you know where you want to get your tattoo, it’s time to think about the visual elements you want involved. Christine V. suggests you keep in mind “what… you actually want in your tattoo, what personal meaning will it carry?” She advises against getting too literal with your design if, at all possible, “Sometimes it is good to consider more metaphorical symbolism, and not just go with a literal theme or idea.

  • Being a bit more subtle and symbolic will yield a more personal and unique tattoo”;
  • Christine D;
  • , another artist at CTD, believes that if you’re looking into getting a custom design, you already have some kind of inspiration in mind – even if you don’t consciously know it yet, “…it is pretty rare for someone to simply get a custom tattoo designed ‘just because’… There is always a trigger for the desire [to get] a tattoo”;

She goes on to explain: When someone seeks an unique design, made just for them, it is a sign that there is something very special that they feel connected to, and that they need to make it a visible part of themselves, but…the person [doesn’t always have] a clear picture of what they want, sometimes what they have is just a feeling.

And how to put a feeling into paper? Which is where working with an artist comes into play. “A tattoo is always more than a piece of artwork, it is an inspiration”, says Christine D. , so she encourages potential clients to think about what inspires them, whether it be music, art, someone special in your life, or a symbol to represent your own personality and experience.

Jen also recommends you think about what’s meaningful to you, because tattoos are “such a personal form of self-expression”, you could take inspiration from: one of your favorite places, animals, flowers, people you want to celebrate or remember, significant moments in your life, hobbies or media you enjoy, your heritage, mythology that resonates with you, or any symbolism that you feel connected to.

If you can’t decide on just one theme, don’t worry, Jen says, “tattoos… don’t necessarily need to have one driving theme in order to be a beautiful piece of art. If you are having trouble focusing on one theme, you can always incorporate several themes and elements into your tattoo”.

There a few different techniques that an artist could use to do this, like, “we can use filler elements (like clouds, waves, flowers, etc. ) to tie all the elements together into a cohesive whole, or just draw everything in a specific tattoo style which will unite all the disparate elements”.

Tattooist and CTD artist Andy W. echoes the idea of going with something personal, “so that it will mean something for the rest of your life”. He would not, however, advise going with a spouse’s name, “Personally, I think a partner’s name is a bit risky, as anything could happen”.

But that person can be inspiration for a symbol that represents your relationship , and make for a unique and lasting tattoo. There’s a ton of room for creativity and expression through art when you’re coming up with a tattoo design idea, but choosing something that is meaningful to you personally increases the chances that you’ll be happy with the tattoo in the long-term, as opposed to getting a trendy, ‘current’ design done..

Where should you not get tattoos?

Tattoos are a great way to express yourself. Aside from the endless designs to choose from, tattoos are also placed on different parts of the body. But it’s important to remember that they are a lifelong commitment which is why you should carefully consider their placement.

Who shouldn’t get a tattoo?

Is there an app to test tattoos?

The InkHunter app features a cool use of augmented reality that allows you to test-drive a tattoo on your body in real time. The result is realistic enough that it might empower you to finally schedule that appointment—or go back to the drawing board.

Is there a tattoo app?

MediBang Paint – If you’re looking for a free app to draw and design your tattoos, then MediBang Paint is the one for you. Initially created as a comic creation app, MediBang is a great graphic app that you can use to design a tattoo for yourself or your clients. It offers multiplatform support and is available for Android, iOS devices (iPhone and iPad), Windows, and macOS.

Did I mention that it’s free? You can use the app to draw and paint gorgeous tattoos. Start a design on your PC, then take it over to your iPad or Android tablet with ease. You can use it to import photos to help create or design a photo tattoo.

MediBang also has a network of users that you can share your work with when you create an account. That’s a great way to get your work out there, besides the traditional social media route. While the app does have ads, they don’t disrupt the creative process.

Is there a tattoo design app?

INKHUNTER- try tattoo designs – How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Inkhunter is one of the top free tattoo design apps one could use on smartphones due to its skill of augmenting reality. This technology has made designing tattoos an exciting experience because you can see how it appears on your skin before getting permanently inked. Artist will highly benefit from using this app on their android or iOS smartphones due to the amazing interface and reassurance they can provide to their customers.

Inkhunter has a wide variety of free tattoo designs that can be easily accessed by the user. One can also get creative and can design your own tattoo virtually on any portion of the body to check how it looks before visiting a tattooist.

Another awesome AR feature is that you’ll be able to view the tattoo exactly how it should appear on human skin, and from all the angles. This can save you from a bad tattoo decision while showing you the best possible placement for your ink. This makes it very easy for you to edit a photo with a tattoo of your choice to show to the tattooist before you get started.

  1. Rather than becoming the victim of unfortunate tattoo ideas, the app can inspire you to get creative and use their tattoo ideas for free;
  2. We found Inkhunter to be the best for the same reasons, except that their pop-up ads are a bit of an inconvenience;
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However, given the free app, that’s something we can easily overlook. Download: INKHUNTER  Android  Apps Now!!.

What is the least painful tattoo spot?

Least painful to tattoo – The least painful places to get a tattoo are areas of your body with fewer nerve endings. Think outer shoulder, calf, buttocks, and outer arm. While people generally focus on the location on the body, Stanley Kovak , a cosmetic physician, theorizes that pain is more about size.

What’s the most common first tattoo?

When it comes to getting a first tattoo, there are good placement choices and ones that most artists would discourage (or outright) refuse for a client. For example, most tattoo artists give a first timer a design on their hand, neck or face—because these locations are extremely visible and they want people to understand the consequences that these types of tattoos can have on a person’s life.

However, if you’re in the majority and don’t plan on getting a job stopper for your first tattoo, it’s time to discuss some of the best and most common placements for a first tattoo. Whether you’re selecting the placement for a tattoo because of the design, the pain or the ability to cover it up—we’ve narrowed down our top 9 tattoo locations for first timers.

Take a look at the gallery below to see where we’d recommend you get a first tattoo and let us know where you got your first tattoo in the comments section on Facebook. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Hip The hip is a great place to put a first tattoo because it’s very easily hidden. Under most circumstances, besides the beach, a hip tattoo will not be seen in people. Therefore, it’s a safe way to wade into collecting tattoos. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Forearm The forearm is an excellent place for a first tattoo because it’s a clean canvas for the artist and one of the least painful spots on the body for a client. Whether you go big or go small, that’s up to you but there’s no going wrong with a tasteful forearm tattoo. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Thigh Over the past few years, thigh tattoos have become increasingly popular among first timers. It’s a large, open space that can be easily hidden—and I personally can attest to the thigh being a prime location for a first tattoo. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Wrist While wrist tattoos are among the most visible tattoos a person can get, if done well, there’s really no harm with a classy and well-done tattoo on the wrist. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Ankle Ankle tattoos are perhaps the most popular designs for first times and based on the many tasteful and subtle examples out there—we can tell why many tattoo virgins go for the ankle. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Inner Bicep Inner bicep tattoos are awesome because they still allow for the edge of having an arm tattoo, however, they allow the wearer to slide under the radar as a tattooed person. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Outer Bicep But if you’re committed to being a tattoo collector and want to make a bold statement with your first tattoo—why not give an outer bicep tattoo a shot? This tattoo can still easily be hidden under clothes, but it’s still totally badass. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Shoulder Blade Want a tattoo that even you can’t see? Well, a shoulder blade piece may be for you. Shoulder tattoos are extremely elegant and you’ll surprise everyone with your well hidden ink. How To Figure Out What Tattoo To Get Calf Lastly, calf tattoos are a great choice for first time tattoo clients because they can be effortlessly disguised under pants. If you’re someone who frequently wears pants to work but prefers to show off your legs on the weekend—you’ll love having a tattoo on your calf..

Is it better to eat before getting a tattoo?

The bottom line – Tattoo artists recommend you eat one to two hours before your appointment and a meal full of protein and vegetables is a good choice. Beyond the nutritional benefits, it’s unlikely that a healthy meal will overstuff you to the point of nausea — a bonus if you’re especially squeamish around needles.

  • If you’re planning on packing snacks, check with your artist on whether food is allowed and what to bring;
  • Peanut butter cups won’t be a smart move if your artist is deathly allergic and a bag full of fast-food is just plain aggressive;

And that’s no way to start a session, is it?! If you liked our story Here’s What to Eat Before Getting a Tattoo, Plus Foods to Avoid, make sure to check out the 13 Important Things to Know Before Getting Your First Tattoo ..

Will I regret getting a tattoo?

It’s not unusual for a person to change their mind after getting a tattoo. In fact, one survey says 75 percent of their 600 respondents admitted to regretting at least one of their tattoos. But the good news is there are things you can do before and after getting a tattoo to lower your chances of regret.

Where should I get my first tattoo?

What tattoo spots hurt most?

Where did Billie Eilish get her tattoo?

She got her second tattoo, a massive black dragon on her right thigh, in November 2020. – Billie Eilish photographed by Craig McDean for British Vogue. Craig McDean/Vogue Fans first caught a glimpse of Eilish’s thigh tattoo in a photo shoot with British Vogue , published in May 2021, though she told Rolling Stone that she got it six months prior. The ink made its first public appearance at the 2021 Met Gala, where Eilish wore an Oscar de la Renta gown with a thigh-high slit.

What does having tattoos say about a person?

Author:  Sophia Carter – Institution:  Whitworth University ABSTRACT Research supports personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals. However, few studies have investigated whether any of these differences are associated with positive indicators for tattooed individuals.

In this study, personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals in three of the Big Five personality areas considered critical to successful employees in the workforce were examined.

Previous research has established that higher levels of conscientiousness and extraversion coupled with lower levels of neuroticism are indicators of high-quality employees. The present study attempts to augment this line of research by adding the dimension of tattoos; investigating whether individuals with tattoos report more positive personality indicators in these dimensions than individuals without tattoos.

Thus it was hypothesized that tattooed individuals would report higher levels of conscientiousness and extraversion and lower levels of neuroticism than non-tattooed individuals. For this purpose,  N  = 521 individuals completed an online survey, which included the 44-Question Big Five Inventory.

An independent sample t -test revealed a statistically significant difference between tattooed ( M  = 3. 41,  SD  = 0. 77) and non-tattooed ( M  = 3. 21,  SD  = 0. 83) groups in the Big Five personality area of extraversion,  t  (521) = 0. 39,  p  =. 004,  d  = 0.

25. There were no other statistically significant differences. These findings indicate that tattooed individuals may be better employees than previously believed, as the extraversion component of the Big Five Inventory, has been found to be a critical indicator of successful job performance.

INTRODUCTION Tattoos have increased in popularity over the last two decades; almost one in five people across all age groups had a tattoo as of 2012, and one in ten people have two or more tattoos (Swami et al. , 2012). Nearly 40% of young adults (18-25) have at least one tattoo, whereas only 15-16% of members of this age group in 1990 were tattooed (Swami et al.

  1. , 2012);
  2. Despite the increase in tattoos within younger generations, tattooed individuals face discrimination, negative stigma, and lower levels of employment than their non-tattooed counterparts (Horne, Knox, Zusman, & Zusman, 2007);

Very little research has examined whether individuals with tattoos score differently than non-tattooed individuals on scales measuring personality traits perceived as positive. This study seeks to address this gap by identifying personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals and the potential implications of those differences for employment.

Historically, the traits associated with tattooed individuals have depended significantly on the culture and circumstances of those individuals. Captain Cook explored Polynesia in 1769 and observed the social and spiritual significance of tattoos in Polynesian culture.

The location of a tattoo on an individual’s body and the specific tattoo design displayed social, hierarchal, and genealogical information about the owner of the tattoo, as well as signaling particular aspects of his or her character (Parry, 1933). Tattooing was considered a sacred ceremony, and most tattoos were thought to fetch spiritual power, protection, and strength.

  1. Almost every Polynesian individual had tattoos, and many of Captain Cook’s men left their voyage with a permanent memento of their expedition, which was considered a great honor (Parry, 1933);
  2. Similarly, Native Americans report a long and extensive history of traditional tattoos;
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Depending on the tribe, tattoos could signal hierarchy or a specific role within the tribe, mark a warrior’s prowess in battle, or be considered marks of beauty (Littell, 2003). Since then, through the shift towards Western culture and through changing definitions of art, tattoos have become more associated with criminals and the sexually promiscuous (Wohlrab, Fink, & Kappeler, 2005).

Recent studies have shown there are still many stereotypes attached to individuals with tattoos: academic struggle, broken homes, traumatic childhoods, rarely or never attending church, poor decision-making skills, and susceptibility to peer pressure (Roberts & Ryan, 2002).

However, these stereotypes may not accurately represent the current tattoo climate. Forty percent of 26 to 40-year-olds now have a tattoo, closely followed by 36% of 18 to 25-year-olds (Swami et al. , 2012). The rising popularity of tattoos among young to middle aged individuals suggests that tattoos may hold different significance sociologically, biologically, and socially than they have throughout the previous century (Wohlrab et al.

, 2005). Research is mixed on whether the negative stereotypes associated with tattoos are accurate. A study completed in 2007 in Germany evaluating tattooed and non-tattooed individuals using a Big Five Personality Inventory found that tattooed individuals scored higher on the subscale of extraversion, and lower on the subscale of neuroticism (Wohlrab, 2007).

More recently, a 2012 study of 540 individuals from Austria and Germany examined Big Five personality traits in participants, as well as a need for uniqueness, sensation seeking, self-esteem, religious and spiritual belief, and demographic variables. The researchers in this study concluded that not only do those with tattoos have higher levels of need for uniqueness, sensation seeking, and thrill and adventure seeking, but they have lower levels of self-esteem, attend religious services less, and are generally much less educated than individuals who did not have tattoos (Swami et al.

, 2012). For decades, businesses have attempted to identify personality traits that predict a successful employee. When United States federal law banned the use of polygraphs for employee selection in 1988, hirers began using personality surveys as the primary method for making hiring decisions (Stabile, 2013).

Job interviewers now ask questions designed to reveal components of an individual’s personality in order to evaluate where that individual would best fit within the company structure, how committed to the job the individual would be, and their likelihood of advancing through the company ranks (Wohlrab, 2007).

However, studies as late as 2010 have shown that despite this shift to personality-based hiring, companies still discard potential employees on the basis of their tattoos (Burgess, & Clark 2010). Researchers have also attempted to determine personality traits capable of predicting successful employees.

A 2014 ten-year longitudinal study of over 8,000 individuals working within multiple big business companies revealed that there is a significant statistical difference between the managerial and working classes in three Big Five personality dimensions: neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness (Palaiou & Furnham, 2014).

  1. Conscientiousness was shown to be the best predictor of overall successful job performance and individuals who scored higher in this dimension tended to be more achievement oriented (Li, Barrick, Zimmerman, & Chiabaru, 2014);

Neuroticism successfully predicted poor work performance; the lower the levels of neuroticism, the higher the level of performance from the employee (Barrick, Mount, & Judge, 2001). Finally, higher levels of extraversion were linked to higher levels of task performance and proactivity (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

  • This study attempts to augment the area of research pertaining to tattooed individuals’ personality traits by investigating whether tattooed individuals differ significantly when compared to their non-tattooed peers in areas related to successful employee traits;

It was hypothesized that tattooed individuals would score higher in conscientiousness and extraversion and lower in neuroticism as measured by the Big Five Inventory. MATERIALS AND METHODS Participants Participants were recruited through a campus-wide e-mail at Whitworth University, Facebook psychology groups, and global online psychology research forums.

Participation was entirely voluntary, and participants could complete the study on their own time at their own pace. 521 individuals completed the survey, 411 females and 110 males, aged from 18 to 62 years old.

How to decide on the PERFECT Tattoo idea: The WTF technique

Materials Participants completed an online version of the 44-Question Big Five Inventory (John, Donahue, & Kentle, 1991) followed by basic demographic questions addressing age, sex, education level, and university affiliation of the participant. Participants were also asked if they had any tattoos.

  • Participants with tattoos were asked to indicate the size and location of those tattoos;
  • The survey measured the Big Five areas of personality: openness to experience, neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, and agreeableness;

For example, questions measuring conscientiousness asked the participant to rate statements such as: “I am someone who does a thorough job” or “I am a reliable worker” on a five-point Likert scale. Items measuring neuroticism stated, “I am someone who remains calm in tense situations” and “I am someone who is emotionally stable, not easily upset”.

Finally, items related to extraversion included statements such as “I am someone who is talkative” and “I am someone who is full of energy” (John et al. , 1991). Participants were asked to rate their agreement with a series of such statements on a five-point Likert on a scale of one (“strongly disagreeing”) to five (“strongly agreeing”).

The Big Five Inventory has scored between 0. 73 – 0. 82 on Cronbach’s alpha test over the course of its development, giving it a high degree of internal consistency and thus, reliability (Schmitt et al. , 2007). The survey contained nine questions regarding conscientiousness, eight questions regarding neuroticism, and eight questions regarding extraversion.

The three personality subscales of conscientiousness, extraversion, and neuroticism were scored using a formula that calculated a numerical value for each personality dimension by adding each individual’s selected scores on the Likert scale, which were then averaged between all participants for an overall mean.

RESULTS A total of N  =521 individuals completed the survey. Of that 521, 411 were female and 110 were male. Participant age varied from 18 to 68 years old. Participants were current students or alumni from 54 universities of various sizes in both rural and urban locations throughout the United States.

  • Two hundred sixty-six (51%) identified themselves as having no tattoos and two hundred fifty-five (49%) identified themselves as having tattoos;
  • A two-tailed independent sample t -test revealed no statistically significant difference in levels of conscientiousness between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals ( p  =;

30; Figure 1). Like conscientiousness, a two-tailed independent sample t-test revealed no statistically significance difference on the neuroticism personality scale between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals ( p  =. 53; Figure 1). Results revealed a statistically significant result regarding extraversion.

A two-tailed independent sample t-test revealed a statistically significance difference between tattooed individuals ( M  = 3. 41,  SD  = 0. 77) and non-tattooed individuals ( M  = 3. 21,  SD  = 0. 83,  p  =.

004; Figure 1). DISCUSSION The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there were positive traits associated with individuals who have tattoos. It was proposed that tattooed individuals would score higher on the conscientiousness and extraversion domains and lower on the neuroticism domain as measured by the Big Five Inventory than their non-tattooed peers.

  1. Tattooed individuals scored significantly higher in extraversion than their non-tattooed peers, but there were no significant differences in conscientiousness or neuroticism between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals;

Though tattooed individuals did not differ significantly in two of the three areas tested in this study, the significant difference in extraversion suggests that those individuals with one or more tattoos may display higher levels of task performance and proactivity in the business world (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

A growing body of literature suggests tattooed individuals display different personality traits than their non-tattooed counterparts, and this study lends further support to this hypothesis. Specifically, the present study supports the findings from several other studies that tattooed individuals consistently score higher in extraversion than their non-tattooed peers (e.

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, Stirn, Hinz, & Brahler, 2006; Swami, 2012; Swami et al. , 2012 Wohlrab, Stahl, Rammsayer, & Kappeler, 2007). This study may be limited by the high proportion of female participants ( n  = 411) compared to and male participants n  = 110). A study in which males and females are equally represented could be better extrapolated to the general public.

  • However, a similar study, performed in 2012 with 45;
  • 6% male participants found very similar results to the present study; tattooed individuals scored significantly higher than non-tattooed individuals in extraversion, but did not score differently in any of the other Big Five personality dimensions (Swami et al;

, 2012). Future research should be conducted with a more age-diverse sample, as the present study had a mean age of 24. 47 years old. Though this study lends itself well to explaining the personality attributes of the younger generation, it does not shed any light onto the baby boomer generation, who are currently the individuals holding CEO, managerial, and most importantly, hiring positions over the younger population (Odgers Berndtson, 2012).

Over the next decade, a mass exodus of baby boomers is expected to occur, leaving open positions for the younger generation (Odgers Berndtson, 2012). However, if baby boomers are still utilizing stigmatized hiring criteria regarding tattoos, they are excluding a class of individuals who are more proactive and task performance oriented than their age-matched peers (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

Gathering more research regarding generational differences in personality attributes and attitudes towards tattoos may have the potential to change current hiring criteria. Additionally, examining the final two personality domains (agreeableness and openness to experience) in the Big Five Inventory may lead to further information regarding the relationship between tattoos and personality, which could divulge more information regarding desirable characteristics in employees.

Agreeableness has been correlated with success in several specific job fields, such as those that require considerable interpersonal interaction. Similarly, the openness to experience dimension has predicted success in fields where teamwork and training performance are important (Barrick et al.

, 2001). Finally, associations between tattoos and personality could be further explored by examining whether the effect is binary (tattoo vs. non-tattoo) or a gradient (influenced by the quantity of tattoos). Tattooing has rapidly become a prevalent phenomenon in western culture.

  • It may therefore be time to reexamine the stigma attached to hiring tattooed individuals;
  • Extraversion, which indicates higher levels of task performance and proactivity in a job setting (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006), is starting, through recent research, to become associated with tattooed individuals;

The business industry stands to gain quality employees who may be well suited to long-term success and significant contributions to the company if hiring criteria regarding tattoos were to be reassessed (Sackett, Burris, & Ryan, 1989). REFERENCES

  1. Barrick, M. , Mount, M. , & Judge, T. (2001). Personality and performance at the beginning of the new millennium. What do we know and where do we go next? International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 9 , 9-30.
  2. Burgess, M. , & Clark, L. (2010). Do the “savage origins” of tattoos cast a prejudicial shadow on contemporary tattooed individuals? Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 40 , 746-764.
  3. Horne, J. , Knox, D. , Zusman, J. , and Zusman, M. (2007) Tattoos and piercings: Attitudes, behaviours, and interpretations of college students. College Student Journal, 41 , 1011-1020.
  4. John, O. , Donahue, E. , & Kentle, R. (1991). The Big Five Inventory–Versions 4a and 54. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley, Institute of Personality and Social Research.
  5. Li, N. , Barrick, M. , Zimmerman, R. , & Chiabaru, D. (2014). Retaining the productive employee: The role of personality. The Academy of Management Annals, 8 , 347-395.
  6. Littell, A. (2003). The illustrated self: Construction of meaning through tattoo images and their narratives (Doctoral Dissertation). Retrieved from Proquest database. (Order No. AAI3077541).
  7. Odgers Berndtson. (2012). After the Baby Boomers: A Next Generation of Leadership [Brochure]. London: England, Cass Business School.
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  15. Stirn, A. , Hinz, A. , & Brahler, E. (2006). Prevalence of tattooing and body piercing in Germany and perception of health, mental disorders, and sensation seeking among tattooed and body-pierced individuals. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 60 , 531-534
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Should I lose weight before getting a tattoo?

How Weight Gain Affects Tattoos – Only in cases of extreme weight loss or weight gain will you see a noticeable difference in a tattoo design, says celebrity tattoo artist Dillon Forte: “Weight change has virtually no effect on the tattoo unless the weight gain or loss is like 100 pounds.

  1. With drastic weight gain it needs to be enough to cause stretch marks, which in turn will impact your tattoo;
  2. ” Similar to weight loss, weight gain can affect the placement and size of the tattoo design;

During pregnancy, tattoos located directly on the body’s midsection are susceptible to change due to the rate at which the skin expands. While stretch marks can alter an existing tattoo design, the effects of the marks depend on each individual’s specific design and placement.

If you decide to touch up the area later on, seek out a tattoo artist who specializes in the area, as this skin texture can prove tricky to work with. Working out and toning your muscles shouldn’t affect your tattoo at all, but if heavy weightlifting is in fact your thing, significant muscle gain could morph the shape.

The better the placement of the tattoo in relationship to the muscle, the less chance of it changing. If you’re concerned about this before getting the tattoo (maybe you’re planning to make some lifestyle changes), discuss it with your tattoo artist.

Do tattoos make you hotter?

In a study, women rated tattooed men as healthier but not more attractive than men without tattoos. Men viewed tattooed men as more attractive but not healthier than men without tattoos. Women judged men with tattoos as worse potential parents and partners than men without tattoos.