How Deep Is A Tattoo?

How Deep Is A Tattoo
– The tattoo needle punctures your skin around 100 times per second, with the aim of depositing the ink in a region of 1. 5 to 2 millimeters below the surface of the skin. The reason for this depth of penetration is to bypass the outer layer of the skin, or the epidermis.

  • This part of the skin constantly renews itself;
  • Every day, thousands of epidermal cells are shed from your skin and replaced with new cells;
  • Ink injected into the superficial skin layer would simply come off within 3 weeks;

In order to give the ink a permanent home in your body, the tattoo needle must travel through the epidermis into the deeper layer, or the dermis. Nerves and blood vessels are located here, which is why getting a tattoo hurts and your skin tends to bleed.

  • The bleeding is part of the skin’s natural defense against injury;
  • The result is an influx of immune cells to the site of injury;
  • Macrophages are specialized immune cells, whose job it is to engulf foreign particles and clear them from the tissue;

But this process is only partially successful when it comes to tattoo ink. Some macrophages loaded with ink particles remain in the dermis, while other pigment particles are taken up by the main dermal residents, which are called fibroblasts. Clumps of pigment particles have also been found to stick between the dense collagen fibers of the dermis.

Although every new tattoo will display some pigment loss, the majority of the ink will stay in the skin. A study in mice reported that 42 days after tattooing, 68 percent of the dye was still located at the injection site.

But where is the rest of the ink?.

How far deep is a tattoo?

So, Where Should The Needle Go? – The tattoo needle should go into the dermis layer of the skin. This layer lies in the middle, and is the perfect spot for ensuring the ink will stay in the skin, and not ‘bleed out’ as the tattoo heals. The epidermis is not a good ink location since it is too exposed and too outward, while the hypodermis is too deep into the skin, which means the ink won’t be as visible and the pain during tattooing would be twice as intense.

Also, if the needle penetrates the hypodermis, the client will most certainly experience an infection. So, how deep, to be exact, should a needle go into the skin? The answer is – approximately 1/16th inch deep into the skin.

This means that the ink will be placed exactly between the 2mm of the dermis layer. If you’re wondering how a tattoo artist knows where the dermis layer is in the skin, we’ve got you covered with that as well. Before the tattooing process begins, the tattoo artist adjusts the tattoo machine and the needle in regards to the parameter of the dermis layer location.

  1. So, the dermis layer is approximately 1/16th inch deep into the skin;
  2. With that knowledge, the tip of the tattoo needle is adjusted to only enter the skin at such depth, not a millimeter shallower or deeper;

This means that the tattoo needle should not stick out the tattoo machine more than 2mm, or less than 1mm.

How many layers of skin does tattoo go through?

Just How Far Does The Needle Go? – Now that you know a little more about the machine and the needle, it’s time to discuss the third essential piece of the puzzle—your skin. The tattoo needle goes through 1/16th of an inch of skin. That might not sound like a lot of skin, but it is really going through five sublayers of the epidermis, the dermal layer, and also the top layer of the dermis.

Among these layers is a collection of sweat glands, hair follicles, connective tissue, fat, and blood vessels. During a tattoo session, the needle passes through the epidermis and epidermal-dermal junction, opening a passage in the 2mm-thick dermis.

The dermis is ideal for a couple of reasons. It is far enough not to bleed out and isn’t exposed. Knowing this, the tip of the tattoo needle is minutely adjusted to ensure that it enters the skin to the correct depth. If you were to look at a tattoo needle in the machine, you will see that it sticks out no further than 2mm.

Can a tattoo needle hit a vein?

– This type of tattoo isn’t entirely risk-free. But then, getting a tattoo always involves some level of risk, with an infection being the main cause for concern. The risk for an infection gets a little higher when it comes to tattoos on veins, according to Dr.

  1. Stacey Chimento, a board certified dermatologist at Riverchase Dermatology in Bay Harbor Islands, Florida;
  2. “Tattoos involve applying pressure on your skin with a needle, which can rupture the vein, making it bleed into the surrounding tissue and cause an infection,” she says;

If you have varicose veins, Chimento goes on to explain, this could make things worse and result in veins that protrude even further. “Varicose veins struggle to heal due to their pre-existing damage. If pierced during the tattoo session, they could randomly bleed internally or externally, affecting surrounding organs,” she says.

  1. Another thing to keep in mind when considering a tattoo to cover varicose veins? How that tattoo could potentially impact any future treatment of the veins;
  2. “To treat the diseased veins, they need to be somewhat visible;

And if left untreated, the blood can leak into the leg tissue and cause hyperpigmentation. Although rare, infections and undiagnosed veins can cause a need for urgent care if left untreated,” Chimento says.

How deep is a tattoo needle in MM?

The correct tattoo needle depth is vital for a successful design. If the needle goes too shallow, it will deposit ink that will disappear quickly. Going too deep can lead to permanent tattoo disfigurement and excessive bleeding. A tattoo needle should deposit the ink between 1 and 2mm into the skin to ensure it’s seated within the dermis layer and has bypassed the outer layer of skin (the epidermis).

How painful is a tattoo?

How bad do tattoos hurt? – There’s no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to how much pain you’ll feel when getting tattooed. But if you’re wondering what type of pain to expect, Caranfa says the experience is comparable to the feeling of a cat scratch or a sunburn.

  • “Long periods of irritation and tenderness are what make you feel any discomfort,” Caranfa says;
  • “The sensation of a tattoo needle is very dull compared to a syringe [and needle], it isn’t the needle that causes discomfort as much as it is prolonged tenderness of being tattooed;

” Importantly, different people will report varying experiences of pain based on their individual nervous systems and pain thresholds , says Channelle Charest , a California-based tattoo artist and Co-founder of tattoo scheduling platform Tatstat. Other factors that could affect pain during tattooing include:

  • Age: Studies suggest aging decreases your pain sensitivity , meaning elderly people might experience less pain when getting tattooed. Researchers have yet to determine why this happens but note that the size of parts of the brain that process pain decreases with age.
  • Sex: People who are biologically female are more likely to experience greater pain intensity, a lower pain threshold, and a lower tolerance for induced pain compared to people who are biologically male. However, research is still emerging.
  • Psychological expectations : If you go into a tattoo expecting it to be an excruciating experience, this might affect how much pain you actually feel. Studies suggest that people who feel anxious about and “catastrophize” pain before a procedure often experience higher levels of pain intensity and distress than people with “neutral” pain expectations.

Fortunately, most of the discomfort you feel while getting tattooed will end when your tattoo artist puts down the tattoo gun. “The sensation is only when the needle is in you,” Caranfa says, adding that while it’s typical to experience some soreness, swelling, and itchiness in the days after getting tattooed, it’s “not debilitating.

Do you bleed when getting a tattoo?

– You’ll know you’re experiencing a tattoo blowout within several days of getting a new tattoo. Some people experience mild blowouts, while in other cases, blowouts are more extreme. In all cases, tattoo blowouts cause the lines in your tattoo to blur, and the ink used to create the lines usually moves well outside the edges of the tattoo.

Is tattoo ink toxic to the body?

‘Tattoo inks and permanent make up (PMU) may contain hazardous substances — for example, substances that cause cancer, genetic mutations, toxic effects on reproduction, allergies or other adverse effects on health,’ an ECHA statement reads.

Does your body fight tattoo ink?

Tattoos are a form of body modification where ink is inserted into the skin to create words and art. Tattoos have long been a form of self- and cultural expression. They have been found on mummified skin dating as far back as 3,000 BCE and are represented in ancient art from as far back as 4,900 BCE.

While many people tattoo themselves to show individuality and creativity, in some cultures tattoos reflect social and political rank, power, and prestige or honor the history of a culture like the tattoos of the Māori.

The skills used to create tattoos have, in some traditions, been passed from parent to child (often father to son) for generations. Humans have been creating tattoos far longer than they have understood the body’s reaction to them. Even today, we rarely think of what is taking place “just below the surface” when receiving a tattoo and the different body systems involved.

How do tattoos stay in place if the body’s cells are constantly dying and being replaced? Why are they so difficult to remove? Let’s take a look. When you get a tattoo, the ink is inserted via needle into the dermis (the second layer of skin).

Your body sees this ink as a foreign invader, and activates the immune system to seek out and destroy the unfamiliar material. As part of this process, special white blood cells called macrophages envelop the ink and try to break it down with enzymes to a size small enough to be disposed of through the body’s lymphatic system.

  1. (When the tattoo needle introduces bacteria at the same time as introducing ink, a similar macrophage response takes place;
  2. If the bacteria multiply faster than the white blood cells can destroy them, you will get an infection);

However, large tattoo ink droplets are not broken down by these enzymes. Once taken in by a macrophage, the ink molecules are stuck there. It is this trapped ink that you see when admiring your or your friend’s latest tattoo. But like nearly all cells within the human body, macrophages don’t live forever.

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Scientists have found that when a macrophage dies (white blood cells last for a few days to just over a week ), the ink is once again released into the dermis. But almost immediately, a fresh new macrophage arrives to destroy the freed ink, and once again, the ink is trapped.

And this process continues over time, which keeps the tattoo in place. That said, some smaller droplets of ink over time become small enough that a macrophage is ultimately able to remove them through the body’s lymph system, making tattoos fade slightly as the years pass.

Now, what if you have the name of your loved one tattooed on your arm but the relationship has soured? What can be done to get rid of the tattoo? Because of the macrophage death/renewal process, removing tattoos can be difficult.

Lasers are used to break up the ink droplets into small enough sizes that the body can successfully remove. This process often takes multiple costly visits with the service technician. However, scientists’ knowledge of the way that macrophages preserve tattoos may help in their eventual removal.

If we can somehow stop the arrival of new macrophages to the area where a tattoo is being removed, it could speed along the laser process and allow the lymphatic system to more easily drain the fragmented particles.

But there is still much research to be done before we can make this a reality. One question that arises when thinking about the body’s reaction to a tattoo is: If someone is immunocompromised, is it safe to get a tattoo? The jury is still out. There have been instances of immunosuppressed people having severe muscle pain and swelling after receiving a tattoo.

  1. But it is not clear if these instances were caused by the tattoo process or by something else (e;
  2. , an injury) that coincided with getting the tattoo;
  3. It seems plausible that a body already struggling to fight infections could be overwhelmed when a tattoo is added to the equation;

But until more research is completed and shared, we can’t be sure. Other research has shown a possible link between tattoos and a strengthened immune system. As noted above, when you get a tattoo, the body’s immune system immediately bolsters itself to fight off infection, but research has found that this happens not just at the “injured” tattoo site but throughout the entire body, and the response has shown to be cumulative.

  1. In addition, as part of the body’s endocrine system, levels of cortisol (the hormone known to produce the “fight or flight” response in times of stress) seem to decrease during subsequent tattoo creations;

When cortisol levels are too high over a period of time, blood pressure and the processing of food can run amok, causing diabetes, and anxiety can become uncontrollable. These decreased moments of cortisol post-tattooing can, thus, be beneficial to overall health.

So, while tattoos seem only “skin deep,” research continues to show us that they affect numerous body systems, including the immune, lymphatic, and endocrine systems. Remember this the next time you pass a tattoo parlor or admire someone’s ink.

To learn more about the human immune system and how it is used, check out the following resources: •     Khan Academy Inflammatory Response Video   •     LabXchange The Immune System Pathway.

Do tattoos ruin your skin?

– When you receive a tattoo, a tattoo artist uses a handheld machine with an attached needle to puncture the skin. Every time this device makes a hole, it injects ink into the dermis — the second layer of skin below the epidermis. Tattoos are a common form of self-expression , but they also damage the skin and can cause complications. Complications can include:

  • allergic reaction to tattoo dyes, which may develop years later (symptoms of an allergic reaction include a rash at the tattoo site )
  • a skin infection , such as a staph infection or cutaneous tuberculosis
  • burning or swelling at the tattoo site
  • granulomas, or nodules of inflamed tissue, around the tattoo site
  • keloids , or overgrowths of scar tissue
  • bloodborne diseases, such as hepatitis B , hepatitis C , HIV , and tetanus (they can be contracted via contaminated, unsanitary needles)

Tattoo ink can even interfere with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests. The long-term effects of tattoo ink and colorings remain unknown. Until recently, no government regulatory agency has closely examined the safety of tattoo ink. More than 50 colorings used in tattoos have been approved for use in cosmetics, but the risk of injecting them beneath the skin is unclear.

Is tattoo ink cancerous?

Cancer – Do tattoos cause skin cancer? This has been a question that researchers have been exploring for years. While there is no direct connection between tattoos and skin cancer, there are some ingredients in tattoo ink that may be linked to cancer.

When it comes to cancer, black ink can be especially dangerous because it contains a very high level of benzo(a)pyrene. Benzo(a)pyrene is currently listed as a carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

Health officials and researchers are especially concerned about the effects of black tattoo ink, as it is the most commonly used color for tattooing. “Blackout” tattoos have also raised significant concern among health officials and researchers. This hot new trend may be especially dangerous since it requires individuals to have large portions of their bodies covered in thick, heavy solid black ink.

In addition to the fear of carcinogens contained in the ink, individuals are also concerned about the way these tattoos cover the body. A change in skin pigmentation is one of the earliest signs of skin cancer, particularly melanoma.

When the body is “blacked out” with tattoo ink, individuals may not be able to notice these changes right away. For this reason, tattoos should never be placed over pre-existing moles, birth marks, or other skin discolorations or abnormalities. Another cause for concern is what happens to a tattoo after you’ve had it for a while.

Does Colour hurt more on a tattoo?

So, Do Color Tattoos Hurt More? – Generally speaking, ink color doesn’t determine the amount of pain you’ll feel. The color simply doesn’t have to do anything with the pain of the tattoo. As we mentioned, tattoo placement, your pain tolerance, and your tattooist’s technique are the main factors determining how painful the process will be.

Sure, there was a time when colored ink used to have a thicker consistency than black ink. This was an issue since it took the tattooist longer to pack the colored ink, which in itself hurts. The longer you’re getting tattooed, the higher the skin damage and the more painful the process becomes.

Nowadays, all inks are of similar consistency, so there isn’t an issue there. Now, if your tattoo artist takes a long time to complete the tattoo, you’ll experience more pain as the process goes on. Also, if the tattoo artist uses a dull needle, chances are the process will hurt more.

Sharp, new needles tend to hurt less. Now, as the needle gets worn out, it remains sharp, but it dulls out a little bit. This small difference in needle sharpness can promote faster skin damage and of course, cause more pain.

If your tattooist uses white ink highlight , you can expect more pain. This is again not because of the needle or the ink color, but rather the pain is caused by the repetition of needle penetration in one place. In order for the white ink to fully show and become saturated, the tattooist needs to go over the same area several times.

  • That is what causes skin damage and pain;
  • Now, after all of the information, we do have to point out that there are people who swear that the coloring/shading of the tattoo hurts more than the linework or tattoo outline;

Pain is a subjective thing, so it can be hard to be exact with the answer to whether color tattoos hurt more than regular ones.

What does a tattoo feel like?

– It’s no surprise that getting a tattoo often hurts. Getting one involves receiving many microwounds over a concentrated area of your body. But there are different sensations of pain. Just think of the difference in sensation between a bruise and a cut. Tattoo pain will usually be most severe during the first few minutes, after which your body should begin to adjust.

If your tattoo is particularly large or detailed, the pain can become intense again toward the end, when pain- and stress-dulling hormones called endorphins may begin to fade. Some people describe the pain as a pricking sensation.

Others say it feels like bee stings or being scratched. A thin needle is piercing your skin, so you can expect at least a little pricking sensation. As the needle moves closer to the bone, it may feel like a painful vibration.

Can you cut off a tattoo?

Surgical removal – Surgical removal, also called excision tattoo removal, involves cutting off tattooed skin and stitching remaining skin back together. It’s the most invasive method of tattoo removal, but also the only guaranteed way to completely remove a tattoo.

  1. It’s often less expensive than laser removal, but it will always leave a scar;
  2. As a result, it’s usually only done on smaller tattoos;
  3. Surgical excision is usually done in a plastic surgery office;
  4. You’ll be given a local anesthetic before the surgeon uses a sharp, knife-like instrument called a scalpel to cut away the tattooed skin;

Then, they’ll stitch the remaining skin back together. The procedure itself can take a couple hours, depending on the size of the tattoo. The healing process will last for several weeks. During this time, you’ll want to apply the prescribed or recommended ointment for several days to help heal your skin and avoid risk of infection.

Can you scrape off a tattoo?

How Deep Is A Tattoo Tattoos are meant to be permanent, but there are still a few methods for removal or concealment. STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Tattoos are meant to be permanent; removal techniques won’t work for everyone
  • The de-inking process has evolved to a method that uses expensive laser technology
  • Heavy-duty makeup kits or over-the-counter tattoo-fading creams could do the trick

( Health. com ) — Getting that tattoo seemed like a good idea at the time. But now that blast from the past on your back or tribal band around your arm may seem like a bit of body art you could live without. If you’re ready to get a tattoo removed, you’re not alone: According to a 2006 survey in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 24 percent of 18- to 50-year-olds have tattoos, and 17 percent have considered tattoo removal.

There’s good news and bad news when it comes to getting a tattoo removed. The bad news is that tattoos are meant to be permanent, and even state-of-the-art removal techniques won’t work for everyone; your chance of success varies with your skin color and the tattoo’s pigments and size.

The good news is that you don’t have to undergo your mother’s tattoo removal technique. The de-inking process has evolved in recent years, from a cringe-worthy, potentially skin-damaging process to a safer, more sophisticated method that uses laser technology.

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Don’t try these at home In decades past, people trying to get rid of tattoos have gone to extreme measures to de-ink. For example, one technique known as dermabrasion involves scraping away or sanding down the skin.

In salabrasion, a salt solution is rubbed into the skin and heated and scraped away. In both cases, when the area heals, the tattoo may be gone, but scars are likely to be left behind. Surgically removing the tattoo is also likely to leave a scar. The tattooed skin is cut out and the surrounding skin is sewn back together.

Occasionally, doctors can perform surgical removals of tiny tattoos. Health. com: The best bathing suit for your body Scars are the most common side effect of tattoo removal. However, for some, the removal technique known as scarification is a form of body modification itself, just like tattooing and piercing.

Much like a chemical peel removes the top layer of skin, an acid solution is used to remove the tattoo in this procedure. The scar that forms in its place covers up whatever ink remains. Cryosurgery, sometimes called cryotherapy, has also been used to remove tattoos.

This procedure freeze-burns the tattooed skin with liquid nitrogen, which is commonly used to treat warts and other skin lesions. None of the above forms of destroying the tattooed skin are recommended, says Dr.

Paul Jarrod Frank, M. , the founder and director of 5th Avenue Dermatology Surgery and Laser Center, in New York City. “You could throw kerosene on it and light a match — that’d be the same thing. ” Health. com: Sun-proof your skin from A to Z The best way to remove a tattoo is with quality-switched, or Q-switched, lasers, which have become widely used in the last decade.

The beam of light searches for contrast between skin tone and ink and pulses intensely on the skin to break the ink down into particles small enough for the body to absorb. “Laser removal is the standard of care,” says Frank, but that doesn’t mean it’s foolproof.

“There is no great treatment. ” Will laser treatment work? Laser treatment works differently for all patients, depending on the tattoo. The greater the color contrast between the ink and skin, the easier the removal will be, says Frank. Black ink on light-skinned people, for example, is the easiest to remove, while fluorescent colors — green and purple, in particular — are nearly impossible to erase.

“Patients with tattoos with those colors, I actually try to convince them not to remove it, unless they just want to fade it enough to cover it up with another tattoo,” Frank says. Smaller tattoos are also easier to remove, as are older tattoos, because the ink is easier to break down.

Taking those factors into consideration, patients should expect to undergo five to 12 laser treatment sessions, according to Frank. You will need to wait a month between treatments, so expect the process to last six months to a year. Health. com: 15 ways to be a natural beauty For Tricia R.

, 24, the road is a long one. In May 2009, she consulted a plastic surgeon in Indianapolis, Indiana, about removing a tattoo she got at age 19 on her lower back. “As I became involved in various activities and organizations at college, I began to realize that my ‘tramp stamp’ was a huge mistake,” she says.

“I wasn’t proud of my decision and wanted to hide it. ” Her doctor estimated she would need 20 laser sessions — more than most people, due to the multiple colors in the tattoo. The entire procedure will cost a couple of thousand dollars, she says. Laser removal can be painful, and for the first few days after the procedure the treated skin looks like a healing burn.

“I don’t know what hell is like, but during my treatments, I would swear that’s where I am,” says Tricia, now on her sixth session. “I immediately felt like I was being pelted with hot grease and flicked with rubber bands.

It by far is the worst pain I have ever felt in my entire life. On top of the pain, the noise of the laser burning my skin is similar to the noise of bacon frying in a skillet. ” Patients should care for the skin like a burn too, applying antibiotic ointment and keeping the skin bandaged, Frank says.

Compared with older treatments, laser removal leaves little to no scarring, but it may cause allergic reactions in some people. In some cases, the skin around the tattooed area can become discolored or infected, and it is important to shield this vulnerable skin with sunscreen.

Any scarring or discoloration should be limited to that area, though. “Lasers can target [tattoo ink] without destroying things you want to leave alone, like healthy skin,” Frank explains. Health. com: What’s that rash? Since treatment sessions add up, the cost of laser removal isn’t so forgiving on bank accounts.

  1. Each session with Frank costs $350;
  2. Since a small tattoo is typically $80 to $100, the cost of removal often far exceeds the price tag of the original ink;
  3. “Despite the pain, time, and cost, I am confident that it will be well worth it when I can look in the mirror and no longer see the evidence of a big regret,” Tricia says;

How to camouflage a tattoo If you’re not ready to spring for laser treatments, heavy-duty makeup kits could do the trick. Companies like Tattoo Camo and Tattoo Cosmetics sell cover-up kits. Even mainstream cosmetics companies, like Dermablend, carry products that may be effective in hiding tattoos.

Many websites and infomercials sell over-the-counter tattoo-fading creams, such as Tat B Gone and Tattoo-OFF. Tat B Gone touts removal in three to nine months; a six-month supply sets a patient back about $270.

Health. com: Get flawless skin naturally The sales pitch is enticing: The creams are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. But the Food and Drug Administration says not to try do-it-yourself products, as they may cause skin reactions. The ingredients active in the fading process are chemical irritants meant to erode the skin, says Frank.

  • The hope is that the body’s natural healing processes will dissolve some of the ink as it heals the area, he says;
  • Whatever technique you use, if you’re not happy with the residual coloration or scarring, you could try one more thing — another tattoo;

Depending on the design, shape, and location, a skilled tattoo artist may be able to incorporate an old tattoo into a new design. Unlike other methods, getting another tattoo — and to a lesser extent, laser removal — is the only procedure that guarantees results.

How long do tattoos last for?

So you’re considering your first tattoo. That’s cool—but don’t rush it. You need time to think about what you want needled into your skin, how badly you want it, and how to get it done safely (namely, by someone who knows what they’re doing). Since there are so many things to consider before you get a tattoo, we presented a few common ink-quiries to Tiffany Tattooz, owner and tattoo artist of Ink Gallery Tattoo Shop in Woodland Park, NJ, and mainstay of Black Ink Crew on VH1.

  1. If you’re in the market for your first ink, read through her starter’s guide;
  2. It’ll inform every decision you make about the emblem you’ll soon wear for (hopefully) the rest of your days;
  3. What are the least (and most) painful body parts to tattoo? Everyone has a different type of pain tolerance when it comes to tattoos, but most seem to experience the least amount of pain in the arm and thigh areas;

These areas of the body have more fat tissue and less nerve density, which in turn causes less discomfort. The most painful will have to be the ribs, feet, and middle chest. There is less fat, the skin is very thin, and the bone is closer to the surface of the skin, allowing one to feel the sensitivity of the needle more.

  1. What actually happens to the skin while receiving a tattoo? Basically, ink is being deposited and penetrated into the dermis layer of the skin;
  2. The pigments are too big to be fought off by our white blood cells, so they just pretty much stay in the dermis layer of our skin forever;

How should someone prepare for a tattoo? It’s recommended that you wash the area of the skin or take a shower before coming in to get the tattoo, especially if you work with paint, construction materials, garbage, or sewage. Although it’s my job as an artist to make sure the area is cleaned, cleaning up beforehand does help reduce the risk of other unclean body parts contaminating the clean area.

  • On site, I always make sure to first clean the area being tattooed;
  • I’ll then shave the customer’s skin and then spray it with alcohol to make sure the skin is fully sterile;
  • How long do tattoos take to heal? Tattoos need about two weeks to heal, on average, although sometimes it can take more time, depending on the client’s skin and how long it took to complete the tattoo;

I tell my clients to keep the bandage on for 8-12 hours, because it allows plasma—our body’s natural way of healing itself—to regenerate skin tissue, thus allowing a quicker healing process and preventing scabbing. Once the wrap is taken off, I tell clients to use a fragrance-free antibacterial soap to wash the tattoo.

They should use lukewarm water—never hot water. However, after completely washing the tattoo, they have to pour cold water on the skin to close up the pores. How should someone care for their tattoo immediately after inking? Wash the tattoo twice a day for the first three or four days, since tattoos are pretty much an open wound at this point.

After washing the tattoo, pat it dry with a paper towel. (Don’t use a cloth towel, because cloth towels hold bacteria. ) Wait 15 minutes and then apply a light coat of moisturizing ointment with clean hands. Apply the ointment twice a day (morning and night) for two days.

Less is better: Using too much ointment will cause problems with healing and fade the tattoo, since thick ointment can clog the pores. After the second day, switch to a fragrance-free lotion and apply 3-5 times a day depending on the consistency, for up to two weeks.

Do not pick or scratch your tattoo during the healing process. Hands should always be cleaned when applying any ointment or lotion on skin. You will have to avoid being in the sun or pool for two weeks, and, most important, in order for the tattoo to stay vibrant for many years, you should always use sun block when outside.

  1. How often do people typically need to get their tattoos touched up? It really all comes down to how they take care of their tattoos and if there were any scabs that have formed;
  2. If there were any issues during the healing process, then you will be able to tell within two weeks whether or not a tattoo needs to be touched up;

If there are no issues, then I would say a tattoo can hold up well for 10 years before seeing that it needs to be brand new again. As you get older, so does your ink. If one is always in the sun it will dull out the ink in your tattoo way sooner than someone who is never in the sun.

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What’s your advice to someone who isn’t sure if they should get a tattoo? Don’t do it until you wake up one day and say, “I’m ready and I know what I want. ” I never recommend someone to get a tattoo if they’re unsure of their ideas or whether or not tattoos are for them.

It’s a permanent procedure—so you want to make sure that you’re confident having something etched on you for the rest your life. If you finally find yourself ready to get tattooed, then the next big step is to find an artist who “specializes” in the “style” you want.

Review their portfolio to see if you like his or her work, and then you can set an appointment. How do you know if your tattoo artist is legit? You can tell by their recognition, their portfolio, how long their wait is, and their prices.

How do prices vary for tattoos? Some artists charge hourly, or some charge by the piece. For larger tattoos, however, some will charge by the day (half-day sessions might be $400-600, or full-day sessions around $1,000 or more). 10. Is it easy to remove a tattoo? Painful? Laser tattoo removal is a painful process and requires many sessions. How has tattoo technology progressed in recent years?

  • Ink: There are now quality ink brands that last longer on the skin throughout the years. Some black inks are so dark, I can’t even use them for shading in a realistic tattoo—I can only use them for solid black work like tribal tattoos.
  • Machinery: New tattoo machines called “rotaries” make no sound while tattooing and feel lightweight on the wrist and hand, which decreases the chances of tendinitis and carpal tunnel for the artist. It almost feels like you’re tattooing with a pencil.
  • Cost: I now even have a “wireless power supply” to run my tattoo machine—it actually keeps track of how long I’ve spent with the client, and how long I’ve been actually “tattooing” them. This never existed nine years ago. The power supply even shows me how much my clients should pay based off the time I spent on them.
  • Needles: Previous needles required different machines to use. Now, there are needle cartridges that you can attach and detach so it can all be done from one machine.
  • Resources: Even social media, YouTube, and online podcasts have made it much easier to learn and grow as an artist quickly. The resources are enormous.

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Can a tattoo go too deep?

While, in a perfect world, there would be no tattoo problems—this is not the world we are living in. Things go wrong during the tattoo process (or the days that follow) every single day and unless we get the word out, clients will continue to get tattoos with noticeable complications. How Deep Is A Tattoo Blowouts Blowouts are any unfortunately common tattoo complication that occurs when the artist puts the ink too deep. If the ink is put in too deep it will spread out throughout the layers of the skin. Blowouts are most commonly noticed immediately after a tattoo is finished, however, some take a few weeks to show up. Typically, blowouts occur when a tattooer is inexperienced, but it can also happen if they are too heavy handed.

  • However, whether it be the fault of the artist or the client, these mistakes are avoidable;
  • Take a look below to learn the 9 most common tattoo complications and what you can do about your issue;
  • Then, if you have experience with one of these tattoo problems, be sure to share your thoughts in the comments section on Facebook;

The only solution for fixing a blowout is with a coverup. However, if the blowout is small, it is possible for the artist to make a few minor adjustments in the tattoo. How Deep Is A Tattoo Keloids Keloiding, while mostly uncommon, can occur from a tattoo. Unlike a blowout, keloiding is completely depending on a person’s genetics. Some people, often people with darker skin, are prone to keloiding and should be cautious when getting a tattoo or piercing. It’s more common for keloiding to occur in piercings, but there are cases where it happens as a result of a tattoo. How Deep Is A Tattoo Bad Translations While we highly recommend researching your tattoo, especially if it is in a foreign language to you, not all artists and clients are careful with this. Google translate is not a reliable source for correct translations and in some writing systems, like kanji, it’s easy to make major mistakes. In order to prevent these mistakes, do your research and if possible, proof your tattoo with someone who if fluent in that language. How Deep Is A Tattoo White Ink Turning Yellow White ink, specifically tattoos that entirely consist of white ink, are still largely taboo in the tattoo industry. And here’s why. White ink is extremely prone to turning yellow, especially when exposed to sunlight. Just like your skin, tattoos change colors due to prolonged sun exposure. The best way to keep your white ink tattoo from yellowing is covering it up when it has the potential to be exposed to direct sunlight.

  • There is no real way to avoid getting a keloid from a tattoo, but we recommend consulting a tattooer if you’re prone to this type of scarring;
  • Artists with experience working on keloid-prone skin may have different techniques for approaching a tattoo;

Whether it be through sunblock or clothing, this is the best solution for protecting your white tattoo. How Deep Is A Tattoo Crooked Ink There’s nothing worse than a nice tattoo that is crooked or unintentionally asymmetrical. Placement is a key component to tattooing and there’s no excuse for having a design that is noticeably off center. Sure, human bodies are never perfectly symmetrical to begin with, however, an artist should be able to make it work. In order to avoid a crooked tattoo, make sure you check over the stenciled design multiple times before the needle hits your skin. How Deep Is A Tattoo Misspelled Tattoos Like poorly translated tattoos, misspellings occur when text is not thoroughly proofed by multiple eyes. It is not the artist’s responsibility to ensure that your tattoo is spelled correctly, it is the job of the client to double, triple, and quadruple check their design. If you end up with a misspelled tattoo, go back to your artist and see if they can make adjustments to the design. How Deep Is A Tattoo Tattoo Infections Infections are an unfortunate side effect of improper aftercare and they can lead to serious health consequences. After getting a tattoo, your artist will give you a strict lists of dos and don’ts, and its important for clients to trust their professional expertise. But in general to avoid an infection, clients should stay away from bodies of water whether it be a pool or an ocean during the healing process.

Additionally, the artist should place the stencil when you’re standing up right and your body is centered. In some cases, the problem can be easily mediated, however, with others a coverup is the only viable option.

If you have an infected tattoo, you need to seek medical attention immediately. There have been serious health consequences because of infected tattoos and some even result in death. How Deep Is A Tattoo Scarring Another common tattoo complication is scarring. Scarring occurs when the tattoo needle penetrates beyond the second layer of skin and comes in contact with the deeper, delicate layers. Artists who are heavy handed, inexperienced or straight up lazy are prone to scarring their clients. Tattoo scarring is largely unfixable and artists need to be extremely careful if they’re tasked with covering up a scarred tattoo. How Deep Is A Tattoo Fast Fading Last, but not least, fast fading is one of the most common complications that afflict tattoo clients. All tattoos will fade over time, however, an inexperienced artist or specific styles and locations are prone to rapid fading. If an artist does not go deep enough with their needles, the tattoo will likely fade quickly. However, certain areas of the body, such as the fingers or the palms of the hand will fade quicker no matter if the tattoo is put in properly.

  • Tattoos are essentially open wounds and an artist can make these scars worse by going over them with a machine;
  • These locations have different skin than the rest of the body and on top of that, they are constantly manipulated through daily use;

There are ways to avoid fast fading, such as enlisting an experienced artist or seeking out a tattooer who specializes in tattooing difficult areas. However, if you have a faded tattoo that needs fixing, your options are to either continuously get the piece touched up or to cover the tattoo with something built to last.

How can you tell if a tattoo is too deep?

Ink distortion and blurring – Tattoo artists have to be very careful with the depth they go to with the needle. Too shallow and ink will seep out. Too deep and the ink will disperse into surrounding areas. It’s this dispersing that leads to ink looking smudged or blurry. How Deep Is A Tattoo.

What happens if a tattoo isn’t deep enough?

In today’s tattoo climate, Instagram and social media often mislead audiences about how their ink will hold up over time. Artists on Instagram want to put their best foot forward and most will post photographs of their fresh tattoos. However, a tattoo only stays fresh for an extremely short period of time and it’s important for consumers to be conscious about the reality of healed tattoos. How Deep Is A Tattoo Raised Lines If your tattoo is raised in any parts, specifically in the linework, that means that is scarred. If a tattooer went too deep during the tattoo, then parts of the tattoo may be slightly raised after the tattoo is healed. How Deep Is A Tattoo Extreme Fading A little bit of fading is natural and normal, however, extreme fading as seen above is out of the ordinary. This is also a result of poor technical application, but instead of a tattooer going too deep, this artist didn’t go deep enough. When a tattooer doesn’t go deep enough with their needles, the tattoo won’t stick and will be more prone to rapid fading. How Deep Is A Tattoo Blowouts Blowouts occur when a tattooer inks too deep and they’re the result of tattoo ink spilling throughout the layers of skin. Blowouts can show up immediately, however, many people tend to notice them after the tattoo has healed. How Deep Is A Tattoo Tattoo Infection If you get a tattoo infection during the healing process, it can dramatically affect the tattoo afterwards. There are varying degrees of tattoo damage due to infections, which each depending on the individual tattoo and the severity of the infection. How Deep Is A Tattoo Blurred Lines Over time but especially after the healing process, lines spaced closely together, as seen in small script tattoos, will begin to blur together. Over time, it will become more and more difficult for people will small and delicate script tattoos to read their ink. How Deep Is A Tattoo Ink Fall Out If your tattoo is applied poorly or applied in a tricky location, it is not only susceptible to rapid fading, but pigment fall out. If you notice large chunks missing from saturated areas of your tattoo, then some fall out has occurred. This can also occur is you pick or scratch the scabs of your tattoos as well..