Who Invented The Tattoo Gun?

Who Invented The Tattoo Gun
Samuel O’Reilly The electric tattooing machine was officially patented on Dec. 8th, 1891 by a New York tattoo artist named Samuel O’Reilly. But even O’Reilly would be the first to admit that his invention was really an adaptation of a machine invented by Thomas Edison—the Autographic Printing Pen.

Who created the first tattoo gun?

Do you have any tattoos? If so, you can probably thank Thomas Edison. In 1875, Edison and his team invented a device that was the first practical application of the electric motor. His portable copy machine never was a huge success, but it did have long-lasting implications.

  • How did it work? What was its history? And what does any of that have to do with tattoos? Well, sit back and read;
  • It’s a fascinating tale;
  • A brief history of copying The movable-type printing press, as you might be aware, was invented in the 15th century by Johannes Gutenberg, who built on the successes of inventors from Asia centuries before;

The printing press was revolutionary. For the first time in history, it made printed works available to the general public. The process could be used to mass produce books or newspapers much more quickly than ever before, and it led to the spreading of knowledge throughout the world.

  • However, using a printing press was cumbersome and labor intensive — and it required the possession of a printing press;
  • What if the average person wanted to make copies of important documents? In the 1870s, an Italian named Eugenio de Zuccato received a patent for a process that used corrosive ink to create a stencil that could then be used to reproduce handwriting;

The papyrograph process was rather involved , using lacquer-coated paper and a modified letter press, but the idea was key. If there were an easier way to create and use stencils, perhaps they were the key to home copying. Bringing the stencil process mainstream Enter Thomas Edison and his assistant, Charles Batchelor.

Their goal was to use their vast knowledge of electricity to create a device that could use stencils to simply and easily produce copies of handwriting. Batchelor’s Technical Notes and Drawings contains a drawing dated July 18, 1875, of a “pen for autographic press” that looks somewhat like a standard writing pen with a battery-powered motor attached to the top.

The electric pen was born. Here’s how the pen worked: The electric motor at the top of the pen turned a cam, which when turning caused a needle to extend through the end of the pin and prick a hole in the paper. The pen’s cam worked like a cam in an internal combustion engine, turning radial motion into linear as the needle extended and withdrew rapidly to make patterns of perforations in the paper, wherever the user’s hand was writing.

Once the paper was perforated as desired, the user would then take an inking roller to pass ink through the perforations to a piece of paper (or other material) beneath. Copy complete! Edison and his team sold the pens in 1875 and 1876, at which point they turned the process over to Western Electric Manufacturing Company, who was to manufacture and sell the pens and pay royalties to Edison.

Their goal in 1877 was to produce at least 200 pens per month. By 1880, a number of competitors were in the market, and the Edison electric pen was in decline, according to research from Bill Burns. (By the way, if you want to see an electric pen in person, stop by the SPARK Museum of Electrical Invention in downtown Bellingham — once we’ve reopened, anyway — and check it out.

) A new industry is born Edison’s electric pen, despite being the first practical use of the electric motor, wasn’t a huge success. However, as is the case throughout the history of electrical invention, the technology lived on.

In 1891, inventor Samuel O’Reilly received a patent for a tattooing machine that was based on the electric pen. Previously, tattoo artists had been able to perforate the skin about two or three times per second. O’Reilly’s device could perforate the skin at an incredible 50 times per second.

  1. According to Inked Magazine, the tattoo machine ” completely revolutionized the industry ,” and in the 130 years since, the device hasn’t even changed a whole lot;
  2. Faster and better tattoos may not have been what Edison had in mind, but his and Batchelor’s work would live on long after the uneventful passing of the electric pen;

Editor’s note: For a more complete overview of Edison’s electric pen, read this extensive and excellent report from Bill Burns of FTL Design..

Did Edison invent the tattoo gun?

The tattoo machine has a long and complicated past, dating back to the 1800s. It all began with Thomas Edison, an American inventor and his rotary type device. He invented it back in 1876 and its main purpose was to create stencils to be used on flyers. Tattooist Samuel O’Reilly modified Edison’s design over the course of fifteen years to create an electric tattoo machine which he patented in 1891.

Who invented modern tattoo?

Body modifications like tattoos have long since been a part of Irish culture, and are depicted in many ways throughout history – in both print and paint. Daniel Maclise’s masterpiece ‘The Marriage of Strongbow and Aoife’ in the National Gallery shows tattooed Irish warriors strewn out on the battlefield.

While the practice of tattooing may have ancient roots, the modern art of tattooing has been made possible thanks to one particularly extraordinary member of the Irish diaspora. Samuel O’Reilly was born in Connecticut in 1854 to Irish immigrant parents.

Very little is known of O’Reilly’s early years, but the 1870 Census (as discovered by  Carmen Nyssen and Rich Hardy at Buzzworthy Tattoo History ) shows the teenage Samuel O’Reilly as being employed in a clock shop, probably specialising in brass objects, given that the area he lived in was famed for its brass production.

O’Reilly was a bit of a wild teenager. He was something of a rebel and a law-breaker. By the time he was 19, he had left the clock shop and was making a living in much more unsavoury ways. This came to a head when, in 1873, he was arrested for burglary of a local convenience store.

Despite being a minor at the time, O’Reilly and his two accomplices were sentenced to two years’ hard labour for their misdeeds. Daniel Maclise’s masterpiece ‘The Marriage of Strongbow and Aoife’ in the National Gallery shows tattooed Irish warriors strewn out on the battlefield. When O’Reilly left prison, he briefly joined the Navy before deserting. Crucially, this is when it is believed that he learned the art of tattooing. From the Civil War period onwards, tattoos had become popular for American servicemen. But with this popularity came a rise in the stigma that only drunk and disorderly military men would get tattoos.

As one American socialite put it, “It may do for an illiterate seaman, but hardly for an aristocrat. ” O’Reilly would soon change this particular prejudiced perspective. It is unclear when O’Reilly began tattooing, but he had certainly made a name for himself in the industry by the late 1880s.

In 1875, he opened a tattoo studio in Chatham Square, in the rundown Bowery district of New York. His career was not just as a tattoo artist, but as a showman. By 1890, he had been dubbed “Professor O’Reilly, the best tattooer [SIC] in the world and a perfect gentleman”. O’Reilly was crucial in developing upon one of Thomas Edison’s failed inventions, the electric pen, seeing the potential of this for the art of tattooing. Through experimentation, O’Reilly developed a machine which could make the job of a tattoo artist a lot easier – the handheld tattoo machine. On December 8th, 1891, US Patent No. 464, 801 was successfully filed by O’Reilly, changing the face of modern tattooing.

  • Many of the people he had tattooed had gone on to travel the world, exhibiting their painted skin;
  • O’Reilly revelled in the publicity, fully embracing the attention of the curious public, and advertising his “painted people” attractions;

With hand-poking, even the most experienced artist can only puncture the skin two or three times a second. His machine increased this to around 50 perforations per second, completely revolutionising the tattoo industry. O’Reilly’s fame and popularity skyrocketed.

He was inundated with bookings and, since he could tattoo more people faster, tattoos became more popular and semi-normalised in all factions of American society. Even wealthy socialites requested “the Professor’s” services, though they dare not step foot in his Bowery Studio, preferring the artist come to them instead.

His popularity did not go unnoticed by other artists, some of whom were eager to get in on the machine-tattooing business. In 1900, O’Reilly brought a rival artist, Elmer Getchell, to court over Getchell’s alleged use of the famed patented tattoo machine.

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Though the case was never conclusively resolved, the pair did seem to have settled out of court. By the turn of the century, tattoo studios were popping up in every major American city and O’Reilly’s influence was spreading even further afield to Europe.

Though he successfully managed to secure his legacy into the next century, he would not be around for much longer. He died in 1909 after falling while painting his house. From infamy as a petty criminal to fame as an artist, the “Tattoo Man” Samuel O’Reilly’s life was certainly a colourful one.

Where was tattoo machine invented?

History [ edit ] – The predecessor to the tattoo machine was the electric pen. invented by Thomas Alva Edison and patented under the title Stencil-Pens in Newark, New Jersey, United States in 1876. [2] It was originally intended to be used as a duplicating device, but in 1891, Samuel O’Reilly discovered that Edison’s machine could be modified and used to introduce ink into the skin, and later patented a tube and needle system to provide an ink reservoir.

While O’Reilly’s machine was based on the tattoo rotary technology of Edison’s device, modern tattoo machines use electromagnets. The first machine based on this technology was a single coil machine patented by Thomas Riley of London , just twenty days after O’Reilly filed the patent for his rotary machine.

For his machine, Riley placed a modified doorbell assembly in a brass box. The modern two-coil configuration was patented by Alfred Charles South, also of London. Because it was so heavy, a spring was often attached to the top of the machine and the ceiling to take most of the weight off the operator’s hand.

″To move tattooing forward, German tattoo artist Manfred Kohrs had to take a look backward. ″ In 1978 Kohrs “introduced the first new design for a rotary machine in nearly a century. His machine was functionally similar to O’Reilly’s except an electric DC motor, rather than electrified magnets, drove the needles.

This slimmer and streamlined version became lighter, quieter, and more portable. It also gave artists more control while ensuring the operator’s hands and fingers cramped less. While some artists gravitated to this rotary revival, others preferred to stick with their trusty coil machines.

Why is it called a tattoo gun?

What Is a Tattoo Gun? – A tattoo gun is a handheld gun-shaped machine (hence the name) that drives tattoo ink into the skin. It allows the artist to make tiny hand movements and is gentle enough to use even on the face – such as when permanent make-up is applied.

What did people use before tattoo guns?

Haida Tattoo Tools – The Haida people who have lived on an island off the Western coast of Canada for about 12,500 years. Though their tools resemble Japanese tebori instruments, the way of application is different, as are the ceremonies in conjunction with a sacred tattoo session.

Via Lars Krutak, ” Haida tattooing seemed to be quite rare by 1885. Traditionally, it was performed in conjunction with the potlatch commemorating the completion of a cedar-plank dwelling and its frontal pole.

Potlatches entailed the distribution of personal property by the host (house chief) to those who had performed important functions in the actual construction of the house. Each gift elevated the status of the house chief and his family and especially benefited the house owner’s children.

  • After the lengthy exchange of goods, each child of the house chief received a new potlatch name and costly tattoo that accorded them high-ranking status;
  • ” Long sticks with needles attached were used for application and lignite stones were used as ink;

Anthropologist J. Swan, who witnessed a Haida tattoo ceremony around 1900, collected many of their tattoo tools and wrote on the labels a detailed description. One of which says, “”Paint stone for grinding lignite for painting or for Tattooing. For paint, ground with salmon eggs & for tattooing, ground with water”.

What was the first tattoo ever?

Fred Verhoeven You might not think the sullen, tattooed teenager skulking around your local record store has anything in common with Winston Churchill, but you would be wrong. Sir Winston, King George V, and the slaves of ancient Greece—to name a few—all have their place in the colorful history of skin decoration. For a practice so commonly associated with youth, tattooing is remarkably old, says professor Nina Jablonski, head of Penn State’s anthropology department and author of Skin: A Natural History.

“Tattoos have probably been important to people for over 10,000 years,” she notes. The oldest documented tattoos belong to Otzi the Iceman, whose preserved body was discovered in the Alps between Austria and Italy in 1991.

He died around 3300 B. , says Jablonski, but the practice of inserting pigment under the skin’s surface originated long before Otzi. In Japan, tattooing is thought to go back to the Paleolithic era, and tattooed Egyptian mummies—primarily female—have been uncovered dating to the age of the pyramids.

In 1948, the excavation of Siberian tombs revealed bodies over 2,000 years old decorated with tattoos of animals and mythical beasts. Egypt’s international trade spread the practice of tattooing to Crete, Greece, and Arabia, and there is a history of tattooing in ancient China, as well as among Celtic and Northern European tribes, such as the Picts—literally “painted people”—and in Samoa and the Polynesian islands, where the word “tatou” originated.

In fact, Jablonski explains, tattooing is as widespread as it is ancient, popping up on every inhabited continent. With the rise of Christianity, tattooing became increasingly associated with paganism and the criminal class, and was prohibited in Europe under the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine.

In the late eighteenth century, the practice of tattooing became popular among British sailors around the time of Captain James Cook’s voyages to Tahiti, and for a time, tattoos were present in the western world mostly on the bodies of seamen returning from the South Pacific.

But the art form experienced a resurgence among the British gentry after King George V and later Edward VII were tattooed (with a dragon and a cross, respectively), and foreign courts followed the British Court’s lead, sparking a rash of tattooed royalty during the nineteenth century.

According to Jablonski, “Tattoos become more socially acceptable because they are visibly sported by people who are themselves socially accepted. ” “People’s reasons for tattooing have varied from place to place,” she adds, “but their central purpose in all places and throughout time has been to convey a message of great significance through a visible symbol.

” In the Middle East, mourners rubbed the ash from funeral pyres into self-inflicted wounds, thereby carrying a piece of the departed with them forever. Tattoos have long been used as a means of identification: The Romans tattooed their criminals and slaves, a practice that was adopted by the Japanese in the early 17 th century, and the Nazis tattooed numbers on the arms of Jews during the Holocaust to dehumanize concentration camp inmates and identify their corpses.

  1. Despite these grim uses, people today primarily use tattoos to tell their personal stories, as talismans, or to memorialize a loved one;
  2. “Their permanence is their allure,” Jablonski explains;
  3. Today, actor Brad Pitt has an image of Otzi the Iceman tattooed on his arm, and the adoption of the practice by movie stars and sports personalities has taken some of the taboo out of the tattoo;

Still, says Jablonski, tattooing retains its reputation as a subculture identifier, though young people are more likely to view tattoos as just another form of self-expression. Tattoos have never been as varied in content and design as they are now. Observes Jablonski, “Classic tattoos will always have a place, but people are increasingly using their bodies to create landscape/bodyscape effects.

” Whatever the direction it takes, tattooing is here to stay. “Tattoos are part of an ancient and universal tradition of human self-decoration and expression,” she concludes. “They convey their messages without words and sometimes even long after death.

” Diamonds may be lost or stolen—it’s a tattoo that is forever. Nina Jablonski, Ph. , is professor and head of anthropology in the College of the Liberal Arts, [email protected] edu. Skin: A Natural History was published in October 2006 by University of California Press..

When was first tattoo invented?

Early and ethnographic tattoos – The earliest evidence of tattoo art comes in the form of clay figurines that had their faces painted or engraved to represent tattoo marks. The oldest figures of this kind have been recovered from tombs in Japan dating to 5000 BCE or older.

  • In terms of actual tattoos, the oldest known human to have tattoos preserved upon his mummified skin is a Bronze-Age man from around 3300 BCE;
  • Found in a glacier of the Otztal Alps, near the border between Austria and Italy, ‘Otzi the Iceman’ had 57 tattoos;

Many were located on or near acupuncture points coinciding with the modern points that would be used to treat symptoms of diseases that he seems to have suffered from, including arthritis. Some scientists believe that these tattoos indicate an early type of acupuncture.

Although it is not known how Otzi’s tattoos were made,  they seem to be made of soot. Other early examples of tattoos can be traced back to the Middle Kingdom period of ancient Egypt. Several mummies exhibiting tattoos have been recovered that date to around that time (2160–1994 BCE).

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In early Greek and Roman times (eighth to sixth century BCE) tattooing was associated with barbarians. The Greeks learned tattooing from the Persians, and used it to mark slaves and criminals so they could be identified if they tried to escape. The Romans in turn adopted this practice from the Greeks.

  1. MORE: Is shoegaze the loneliest genre of music? ‘Stigma’ – now meaning a distinguishing mark of social disgrace – comes from the Latin, which means a mark or puncture, especially one made by a pointed instrument;

Elaborately-tattooed mummies have been found in Pazyryk tombs (sixth to second century BCE). The Pazyryks were formidable Iron-Age horsemen and warriors who lived on the grass plains of Eastern Europe and Western Asia..

How did tattoos start?

On a fall day in 1991, two Germans hiking in the Alps near the Italian- Austrian border stumbled across what they initially believed to be a modern corpse frozen in the ice. Once the body was retrieved however, authorities discovered that it was anything but modern.

The mummy, nicknamed Ötzi after the valley where it was found, had survived in the ice to the ripe, old age of 5,300 years. Analysis of the remains showed that when Ötzi died, he was a 30 to 45 year old man, standing roughly 160 cm tall.

Mystery surrounds the exact circumstances of Ötzi’s death, although evidence suggests a violent end. That, however, is not the only secret Ötzi hides. Ötzi has over fifty lines and crosses tattooed onto his body – the earliest known evidence of tattooing in the world – most of them on his spine, knee and ankle joints.

The locations of many of the markings are consistent with traditional Chinese acupuncture points, specifically those that are used to treat back pain and stomach upset. What is intriguing is that Ötzi lived roughly 2,000 years before the oldest generally accepted evidence of acupuncture, and well west of its purported origins in China.

X-rays revealed that Ötzi had arthritis in his hip joint, knees, ankles and spine; forensic analysis discovered evidence of whipworm eggs – known to cause severe abdominal pain – in Ötzi’s stomach. It is, therefore, possible that Ötzi’s tattoos did in fact play a therapeutic role, and that acupuncture has a slightly more complicated history than previously believed.

Before Ötzi poked his head through the ice, the earliest conclusive evidence of tattoos came from a handful of Egyptian mummies that date to the time of the construction of the great pyramids over 4,000 years ago.

Indirect archaeological evidence (i. statuettes with engraved designs that are occasionally associated with needles and clay discs containing ochre) suggests that the practice of tattooing may actually be much older and more widespread than the mummies would have us believe.

Ethnographic and historical texts reveal that tattooing has been practiced by just about every human culture in historic times. The ancient Greeks used tattoos from the 5th century on to communicate among spies; later, the Romans marked criminals and slaves with tattoos.

In Japan, criminals were tattooed with a single line across their forehead for a first offence; for the second offence an arch was added, and finally, for the third offence, another line was tattooed which completed the symbol for “dog”: the original three strikes and you’re out!  Evidence suggests that the Maya, Inca and Aztec used tattooing in rituals, and that the early Britons used tattoos in certain ceremonies.

The Danes, Norse and Saxons are known to have tattooed family crests onto their bodies. During the crusades, some Europeans tattooed a cross on their hands or arms to mark their participation and indicate their desire for a Christian burial should they not return.

From the Tahitian “tatau” which means to mark or strike, the word tattoo refers to some of the traditional modes of application where ink is “tapped” into the skin by using sharp sticks or bone. Certain peoples in the Arctic however, have used a needle to pull carbon-embedded thread under the skin to create linear designs.

And still others have traditionally cut designs into the skin and then rubbed the incisions with ink or ashes. Modern electric tattoo machines are modeled on the one patented by New York tattoo artist Samuel O’Reilly in 1891, which itself is only slightly different from Thomas Edison’s electric engraver pen, patented in 1876.

The needles of a modern machine move up and down at a rate of between 50- 3000 vibrations per minute; they penetrate only about 1 mm below the surface of the skin to deliver pigments. Our bodies treat the injected pigments as non-toxic foreign elements that need to be contained.

So, certain types of cells in our bodies engulf the minute amounts of pigment. Once full, they move poorly and become relatively fixed in the connective tissue of the dermis, which is why tattoo designs do not generally change with time.

A pigment’s molecules are actually colorless. Those molecules though, are arranged into crystals in various ways such that colors are produced when light refracts off of them. The pigments that are used in tattoos are often made of metal salts, which are metals that have reacted with oxygen; this process is called oxidation and is exemplified by rusting iron.

The pigment is held in a carrier solution to disinfect the pigments by inhibiting the growth of pathogens, to keep it evenly mixed and to facilitate its application. Most modern pigments are carried by alcohols, specifically methyl or ethyl alcohols, which are the simplest and most commonly used types.

The popularity of tattoos has continuously risen and fallen through time. Currently, the practice of tattooing is booming, and it is estimated that roughly one in every seven people in N. America – over 39 million people total – have at least one tattoo. Through time and around the world, the reasons for getting tattoos are numerous and varied.

  1. They include religious purposes, for protection or as a source of power, as an indication of group membership, as a status symbol, as an artistic expression, for permanent cosmetics, and as an adjunct to reconstructive surgery;

And now, a new reason can be added to the list: Andrew Fisher, an American webpage designer, recently auctioned his forehead as ad space on eBay. It sold for over $37,000 and left Andrew with a snoring remedy logo tattooed (semi- permanently) on his head for a month.

Why is tattoo a sin?

Sunni Islam [ edit ] – The majority of Sunni Muslims believe tattooing is a sin, because it involves changing the natural creation of God, inflicting unnecessary pain in the process. Tattoos are classified as dirty things, which is prohibited in Islam.

  • They believe that a dirty body will directly lead to a dirty mind and will destroy their wudhu, ritual ablution;
  • [24] Some Shafi’i scholars such as Amjad Rasheed argue that tattooing causes impurity and that tattoos were prohibited by the Prophet Muhammad;

They also claim that those who are decorated with tattoos are contaminated with najas , [25] due to potential mixture of blood and coloured pigment that remains upon the surface of the skin. [26] Blood is viewed as an impure substance, so a person with a tattoo cannot engage in several religious practices.

[27] However, in the present day, it is possible to get a tattoo without mixing dye with blood after it exits onto the outer surface of the body, leaving a possibility for a Muslim to wear a tattoo and perform a valid prayer.

Scholar Yusuf al-Qaradawi states that tattoos are sinful because they are an expression of vanity and they alter the physical creation of God. [28] According to the online South African Deobandi fatwa service called Ask-the-Imam , Muslims should remove any tattoos they have if possible or cover them in some way.

What does the Bible say about tattoos?

Tattoos have been around for millennia. People got them at least five thousand years ago. Today they’re common everywhere from Maori communities in New Zealand to office parks in Ohio. But in the ancient Middle East, the writers of the Hebrew Bible forbade tattooing.

  • Per Leviticus 19:28, “You shall not make gashes in your flesh for the dead, or incise any marks on yourselves;
  • ” Historically, scholars have often understood this as a warning against pagan practices of mourning;

But language scholar John Huehnergard and ancient-Israel expert Harold Liebowitz  argue that tattooing was understood differently in ancient times. Huehnergard and Liebowitz note that the appearance of the ban on incisions—or tattoos—comes right after words clearly related to mourning, perhaps confirming the original theory.

And yet, looking at what’s known about death rituals in ancient Mesopotamia, Syria, Israel, and Egypt, they find no references to marking the skin as a sign of mourning. They also note that there are other examples in Leviticus and Exodus where two halves of a verse address different issues.

So that could be the case here, too. What tattoos were apparently often used for in ancient Mesopotamia was marking enslaved people (and, in Egypt, as decorations for women of all social classes). Egyptian captives were branded with the name of a god, marking them as belongings of the priests or pharaoh.

But devotees might also be branded with the name of the god they worshiped. Huehnergard and Liebowitz suggest that, given the key role of the escape from Egyptian bondage in ancient Jewish law, the Torah originally banned tattooing because it was “the symbol of servitude.

” Interestingly, though, they write that there’s one other apparent reference to tattooing in the Hebrew Bible. Isaiah 44:5 describes the children of Jacob committing themselves to God: “One shall say, ‘I am the LORD’s’… Another shall mark his arm ‘of the LORD.

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‘” Here a tattoo appears to be allowable as a sign of submission, not to a human master but to God. Ancient rabbinic debates produced a variety of different theories about the meaning of the prohibition on tattooing.

Some authorities believed that tattoos were only disallowed if they had certain messages, such as the name of God, the phrase “I am the Lord,” or the name of a pagan deity. Talmudic law developed around 200 CE says that a tattoo is only disallowed if it is done “for the purpose of idolatry”—but not if it’s intended to mark a person’s enslaved status.

When did US ban tattoos?

In 1962, Massachusetts became one of the few states in the country to consider tattooing a “crime against the person,” and ban the practice except for medical purposes. The law took effect on March 12, 1962, five months after New York City imposed a similar prohibition.

The New York City Board of Health believed that tattoo parlors were fueling an outbreak of hepatitis. At the time Massachusetts was not experiencing a hepatitis outbreak, but health officials believed that tattooing might lead to one.

Over the years, tattoo artists and lawmakers made some lackluster attempts to challenge the statute, but nothing materialized from their efforts. The statute remained in effect until 2000 when the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts launched a successful court battle to overturn it.

ACLU lawyer Harvey Schwartz made the novel argument that the art of making tattoos was protected as free expression under the First Amendment. The Suffolk Superior Court ruled that the Commonwealth’s public health interest in a ban on tattooing could better be served by licensing and regulation, which would ensure that tattooing is conducted under sanitary conditions.

On January 31, 2001, the Cambridge Public Health Department enacted rules and regulations overseeing the practice of tattooing and body art in the city. The regulations were revised on July 1, 2003 pursuant to General Laws, Chap. 111, §31 for the granting of licenses to practice Body Art in the City of Cambridge. Last updated on January 31, 2020 .

How much does tattoo gun cost?

Tattoo Gun Cost – If you already have access to some supplies, you may only need to buy a tattoo gun. The average cost for a tattoo machine is $400 to $900, and that doesn’t include the cost for other tattoo supplies. You’ll get an excellent quality tattoo gun for that price, though.

What is tattoo ink made of?

Professional inks may be made from iron oxides (rust), metal salts, or plastics. Homemade or traditional tattoo inks may be made from pen ink, soot, dirt, ash, blood, or other ingredients.

How many needles are in a tattoo gun?

Types of Needles – Credit: @magicmoon_tattoo_supply There are several types of tattoo needles, with different numbers of needles in a grouping. Let’s see what they are;

  • Round liner needle – this is the type of needle used for extra precise, intricate lining work. The needle can be used for dot work, precise, geometric tattoos, tribal/Samoan tattoos, Japanese designs, as well as lettering. Round liners have a needle code of RL, and the number in front of the abbreviation refers to the number of needles in the group; for example, 9RL means there is 9 needle in the grouping.
  • Round shader needle – this type of needle is similar to the round liner needle. The only difference is the space between the needles in the grouping. Because there’s more room between the needles, they’re used for basic shading and coloring, some line work, geometric and line work, and Japanese and Samoan tattoo design.
  • Magnum shader needle – this type of needle is used mainly for shading. Magnum needles can hold a lot of ink, which makes them perfect for color packing too. They are used for Japanese and traditional tattoos, shading and coloring work, as well as color realism tattoo designs.
  • Curved Magnum shader needle – these needles are used for all types of shading work. They’re excellent because of their slight arc, which allows them to provide comfortable tattooing as well as skin protection. The curved Mangums are grouped in a tight cluster and can have between 7 and 11 needles for the best results. The curved Magnums can also be used for different tattoo work, from color packing to traditional Japanese tattoos.
  • Flat shader needle – this is the type of needle used to create straight, precise lines. The needle provides a clean and clear color payoff, but with each new application, the lines become darker. This makes the Flat shader perfect for black & white work, intricate line work, color realism, shading, as well as for different tattoo designs.
  • Double stack Magnum shader needle – this needle is used for truly intricate work. The pins are packed super tightly, which ensures super precise, intricate shading, and color packing. This needle is generally used to create realistic tattoos , as well as Japanese , tribal , traditional, and neo-traditional designs.

Also Read: 

  • How Deep Should a Tattoo Needle Go?
  • Tattoo Gun Vs. Tattoo Pen: Which Is Better?

When was first tattoo invented?

Early and ethnographic tattoos – The earliest evidence of tattoo art comes in the form of clay figurines that had their faces painted or engraved to represent tattoo marks. The oldest figures of this kind have been recovered from tombs in Japan dating to 5000 BCE or older.

In terms of actual tattoos, the oldest known human to have tattoos preserved upon his mummified skin is a Bronze-Age man from around 3300 BCE. Found in a glacier of the Otztal Alps, near the border between Austria and Italy, ‘Otzi the Iceman’ had 57 tattoos.

Many were located on or near acupuncture points coinciding with the modern points that would be used to treat symptoms of diseases that he seems to have suffered from, including arthritis. Some scientists believe that these tattoos indicate an early type of acupuncture.

  • Although it is not known how Otzi’s tattoos were made,  they seem to be made of soot;
  • Other early examples of tattoos can be traced back to the Middle Kingdom period of ancient Egypt;
  • Several mummies exhibiting tattoos have been recovered that date to around that time (2160–1994 BCE);

In early Greek and Roman times (eighth to sixth century BCE) tattooing was associated with barbarians. The Greeks learned tattooing from the Persians, and used it to mark slaves and criminals so they could be identified if they tried to escape. The Romans in turn adopted this practice from the Greeks.

  • MORE: Is shoegaze the loneliest genre of music? ‘Stigma’ – now meaning a distinguishing mark of social disgrace – comes from the Latin, which means a mark or puncture, especially one made by a pointed instrument;

Elaborately-tattooed mummies have been found in Pazyryk tombs (sixth to second century BCE). The Pazyryks were formidable Iron-Age horsemen and warriors who lived on the grass plains of Eastern Europe and Western Asia..

When was the tattoo pen invented?

In 1891, the first electric tattoo machine was invented and patented by tattoo artist, Samuel O’Reilly. He discovered a device called the “Electric Pen” which was invented by Thomas A. Edison in 1876. The Electric Pen was part of a document duplication system used by businesses and used a high-speed reciprocating motor to drive a single needle. The Electric Pen did not use any ink, rather, perforated holes in a master form, of which then became a stencil.

  1. Ink rolled onto its surface and passed through the holes to make copies onto blank sheets placed underneath the stencil;
  2. O’Reilly took this invention, added multiple needles and an ink reservoir, and earned a U;

patent. This revolutionary device was extremely innovative in opening the door to a whole new generation of growth in the tattoo realm. In 1929, Percy Waters patented a new design which closely resembles the modern day tattoo machine. His machine included two electromagnetic coils that were set parallel with the frame, a spark shield and an on/off switch. Waters was a successful tattoo artist in Detroit, Michigan, where he also ran a tattoo supply company for nearly thirty years. He produced classically noted flash sets and tattooed many well-known tattoo collectors during that era. To read much more about tattoo history , beginning with Otzi the Iceman, a five thousand year old tattooed man, who was found in the Otz Valley in the Alps in 1991 and bore 57 tattoos on his skin, check out this article in the Tattoo Corner section of my site.

In what year was the tattoo machine painted?

Who Invented the First Tattoo Machine? : – Now that we have some background knowledge laid out. Where did the first tattoo machines come from? The answer may surprise you. Thomas Edison is famous for a lot of his inventions. He’s also credited with inspiring Samuel F.

When was the first tattoo shop opened in New York City?

1870 Martin Hildebrandt, the City’s first-known tattoo artist, opened what’s believed to be the first tattooing business in the United States at 77 James St. in Manhattan, located in today’s Chinatown.