What To Bring To A Tattoo Appointment?

What To Bring To A Tattoo Appointment

Come Prepared – What To Bring To A Tattoo Appointment Depending on the length of your appointment, it’s always wise to bring some form of entertainment for yourself. It’ll help keep you occupied and keep your mind off the pain a little bit. Bring a phone charger, headphones, portable game device, book – whatever will keep you busy and help time go by faster for you. It’s also a good idea to bring a water or beverage with you.

What should I do before a tattoo appointment?

What can I take before a tattoo to ease the pain?

Avaliani recommends taking three or four Ibuprofen tablets an hour before your appointment so that your pain tolerance is higher by the time you feel the needle (which, by the way, looks more like the tip of a pen than a needle, in case that word scares you like it scared me).

How early should you arrive for a tattoo?

– If you’ve made it this far into our guide, it’s safe to say that you have all your bases covered. To wrap things up, here’s how your interaction with your artist and getting your tattoo done will likely unfold:

  1. Reach out to the artist or shop to talk about rates and set up a consultation.
  2. Meet the artist to talk about your design and expectations.
  3. Agree upon the final design with the artist and confirm the rate. If revisions are needed, this may involve setting up a follow-up appointment to look over the final design before locking in your tattoo date.
  4. Aspirin (Bayer) and ibuprofen (Advil) are off limits in the 24 hours leading up to your appointment, as they can thin your blood. This applies to the consumption of alcohol as well. You may be able to take acetaminophen (Tylenol), but confirm this with your artist beforehand.
  5. Plan to wear something that will keep the area to be tattooed exposed. If you can’t do this, wear something you can easily slip in and out of.
  6. Show up to your appointment 10 minutes early. Don’t forget to bring cash for tips!
  7. Fill out any paperwork and, if needed, finalize any details of your design.
  8. Your artist will take you to their station. You may need to roll up or remove any clothing that may be in the way of your tattoo placement.
  9. Your artist will disinfect the area and use a disposable razor to remove any hair.
  10. Then your artist will place the tattoo stencil onto your skin. Move this around as much as you like until you’re happy with the placement!
  11. Once the placement is perfect, your artist will tattoo the outline of your design before filling in any colors or gradients.
  12. After your artist is finished, they’ll clean the tattooed area, wrap it up, and tell you how to take care of it.
  13. Don’t forget to leave a tip for your artist when you pay! It’s standard to tip at least 20 percent, but if you had an awesome experience and are able to tip more, go ahead.

If you have any lingering questions, ask before you leave the shop. One of the best times to get them answered is when your artist is wrapping your skin. Since you’re here, screenshot or print out this handy list of questions for your consultation before you commit to an artist.

What should you avoid before a tattoo session?

What should I eat during a tattoo session?

How much do you tip a tattoo artist?

How Much to Tip – If you decide to tip, the next step is to calculate exactly how much to add to the final tattoo price. The general consensus in the tattoo community is that 20 percent is the typical amount to tip — just like at a restaurant or a hair salon.

However, consider this number a baseline, as some tattoos require more or less work than others. Just like there is no one tattoo experience or price, there’s no one-size-fits-all tipping option. “The more you spend on the tattoo, the more you should tip, as they are putting more work into the piece,” says Fiore.

Weed, however, notes that there is one thing that every tattoo experience needs to have to warrant a tip: It needs to be great. Your artist is putting time into the behind-the-scenes of your tattoo, but it’s also their responsibility to ensure you’re comfortable and having a good time while it’s happening.

Do tattoos hurt less if you’re fat?

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process. Tattoos are among the most common body decorations globally. According to a 2010 study , a whopping 38 percent of people 18 to 29 years old have been inked at least once in their lives.

A natural question to ask is, “Does getting a tattoo hurt?” While most people will say yes, in reality this is a complex question to answer. Tattooing involves repeatedly piercing your skin’s top layer with a sharp needle covered with pigment.

So getting a tattoo is generally always painful, though people may experience different levels of pain. People who are biologically male tend to experience and cope with pain differently from those who are biologically female. In addition, the various parts of the body experience different levels of pain when tattooed.

While there is no scientific evidence that says which areas of the body will feel the most and least pain when getting inked, we gathered anecdotal information from sites run by people in the tattoo industry.

Here’s the general consensus: The least painful places to get tattooed are those with the most fat, fewest nerve endings, and thickest skin. The most painful places to get tattooed are those with the least fat, most nerve endings, and thinnest skin. Bony areas usually hurt a lot.

How do I increase my tattoo pain tolerance?

How do you distract pain from a tattoo?

Is it better to get a tattoo in the morning or night?

Time of the week: a few days before your next workout or party – The day of the week isn’t a measure of time that has any real effect on the tattooing process, so it’s fine to get tattooed on whatever day best suits your schedule. That said, Astrid Elisabeth, co-owner of Somewhere, a private tattoo studio in New York, suggests booking your tattoo appointment a few days in advance of the next time you plan to exercise (if you work out daily, you should take at least a day or two off after a new tattoo) or party.

Like any other wound, it’s important to give a new tattoo time to begin its healing process , and the best way to do that is by resting for a few days after its completion. The excess pulling or stretching that comes from working out or partying can impede this process, so try to schedule your tattoos around these activities where possible.

Additionally, if you menstruate, Valentine recommends that you avoid booking your tattoo appointment while you’re bleeding. If your period comes early or you don’t keep close track of your cycle, you can still get tattooed, but she notes that “our bodies are much more sensitive during this time and that makes the pain worse.

Is it more painful to get a tattoo on your period?

This is my first tattoo – will it hurt? – Firstly please DO NOT listen to the experiences of friends. Mean friends often unfairly wind customers up! Tattoos do hurt, but every individual’s experience is different. Pain tolerances vary from person to person, different parts of the body hurt more than others, and the same spot on one person can hurt whist another person would barely mind.

  1. It’s OK to be nervous, but most customers often comment it wasn’t as bad as they thought! Tattooing is certainly not an unbearable sensation, especially for short sessions, and it is, for the most part, more of a mild to moderate annoyance than outright agony! As mentioned above, being well-fed and well-rested will minimise discomfort, and for longer sessions of over an hour or so, you might also find a mild anti-inflammatory pain reliever like Ibuprofen or a Paracetamol helps;
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We’re a very quick and efficient tattooists, so whilst quality comes first, we are also mindful of how quickly we’re working. We work fast to keep pain to a minimum. (Please note with females, it needs to be mentioned that getting tattooed whilst on your period will make the body more receptive to pain, so take that into account whilst booking where possible).

Do tattoo artists like to talk?

Let the artist take lead on the design Most tattoo artists are in fact artists. They want to tattoo you with their own art. This isn’t just a creative preference. Tattooers generally have perfected a certain style (or styles). Their best designs and their best execution will be in this style(s). They want to be confident and and proud of your tattoo.

  • Don’t send them a picture of another artist’s work and say “I want this tattoo”.
  • Don’t be surprised if the artist does not want to tattoo in a style that is not their own.
  • Do share reference images for the subject matter you like.
  • Do share reference images from the artist’s own portfolio and say “I like the style you used here. “

Be as specific as you need to be. Not more or less. Artists love it when you give them creative freedom but don’t do it unless you really do want them to make all creative decisions. If you have something specific in mind, tell them.

  • Don’t tell the artist “you have complete freedom” and then come to the shop and make a lot of corrections.
  • Do tell the artist any specifics you have in mind before they work on the design!

New tattoos are always a better option than “adding on” to, or modifying an existing tattoos. Most artists would rather not work with another artist’s tattoo. It adds constraints to their design potential and it forces them to either: (a) Vandalize an existing, nice tattoo or (b) Have their work seen alongside an existing ugly tattoo. Either way, this won’t be a portfolio piece and won’t get the best work from the artist.

That’s not possible if you give excessive direction or if you force the artist outside of their core styles. Also, remember that good artists won’t copy another artist’s design so don’t ask. Consider: do you really need your existing tattoo to keep growing and becoming more and more of a Frankenstein’s Monster? Or can you offer new real estate to each artist? Cover-ups are a different story.

If you need a cover-up, you need a coverup. Not all artists are technically capable of good cover-ups and not all artists like to do them because of the additional constraint but it’s always worth asking.

  • Don’t think of your tattoo as a house you are continually remodelling.
  • Do think of tattoos more like paintings you are commissioning. Give the artist a clean canvas.
  • Do consider going back to the same artist for modifying or touching up an existing tattoo.

Don’t design by committee There’s nothing worse than customers who bring an opinionated friend or loved one to “help” them with design decisions. You hired the artist to help you with design. Adding a third party can complicate the already-delicate balance of artist/client in the design process. The more opinions you solicit, the harder and more confusing the process will be. Only you know what you want and the artist can help you.

  • Don’t bring a friend or spouse to speak for you.
  • Don’t text photos of the design to friends asking for their opinion.
  • Do tell your opinionated friends to quiet down if they become too involved in your tattoo design process.

Limit your party to yourself + 1 max Speaking of bringing others with you… consider visiting the shop alone for your appointment. Most shops are limited in their space and cannot accommodate your friends. Not only that, your friends might think it sounds fun to be at the shop while you get tattooed, but it’s not. Your friends will be bored.

  • Don’t bring extra people with you to be tattooed without asking the shop first. Most shops don’t want your friends sleeping in the waiting area while you get tattooed.
  • Do limit your party to just you or one other if you must and encourage your friends to go do something while you get tattooed so they don’t sleep in the waiting area.

Let the artist concentrate while you get tattooed Even the most experienced artists need to limit stressors during their tattooing. Tattooing requires intense concentration. Some artists love to gab while tattooing but others prefer to be quiet. Let the artist take the lead or ask them what they prefer.

  • Do bring a book to read or movie to watch provided you can do it without moving.
  • Do let your artist take the lead on whether or not to talk.
  • Don’t stare at the tattoo while your artist is working. This is stressful.
  • Don’t talk too much unless your artit is the chatty one.

Sit still! For obvious reasons, you never want to move while there is a tattoo needle inking your skin. If you might have trouble with pain, consider a numbing cream in advance of getting tattooed (ask your artist first). If you’re jumpy, you’re wasting tattooing time and risking mistakes. Generally though, you’re stressing out the artist which can mean not getting their best work.

  • Don’t move unexpectedly.
  • Don’t talk if you’re getting your ribs tattooed.
  • Do let the artist know if you need to move or stretch.
  • Do let the artist know If you think the furniture can be adjusted to be more comfortable.
  • Do consider topical numbing cream in advance of your tattoo if you’re worried about tolerating the pain (ask the artist first though)

Tipping It is customary to tip tattoo artists just like (in the US) it is customary to tip restaurant wait staff. Because it’s customary, not tipping is seen as a sign of being dissatisfied with your tattoo.

  • Do expect to tip when budgeting for your tattoo.
  • Do tip the artist directly and in cash.
  • Do tip big (e. 20%+) if you love your tattoo.
  • Do talk to your artist whenever you feel something isn’t being handled well (consultation, design, etc). A small tip (or no tip) shouldn’t be the only sign that you are dissatisfied.

Aftercare There are many different aftercare procedures out there. Always follow the artist’s own aftercare instructions because you and the artist are both responsible for the quality of your tattoo.

  • Do make sure to get precise instructions for aftercare from your artist.
  • Do feel OK to ask questions during the healing process if something seems wrong.
  • Do a little research about healing tattoos to know what’s normal. Scabbing is normal. Ink on the bandage is normal. Looking faded in the first couple of weeks is normal.

Touch-ups Most tattoos will not need touching up — at least for many years. However, sometimes ink does fall out or fade. This can happen for many reasons. The artist’s tattoo technique matters but it’s just half the story. Healing/fading is also affected by aftercare, your biology, the placement on the body (bendy parts like wrists, elbows, fingers, etc will fade more and faster).

  • Do wait 30 days before even considering a touch-up. Tattoos can look less-than-perfect while healing and need 30 days to be completely healed.
  • Do take good care of your tattoo following artist instructions and avoiding any strong sun exposure, rubbing, or soaking of the tattoo area while it’s healing.
  • Don’t expect the tattoo ink to look as vibrant as it did the day of your tattoo. Tattoo ink sits under the top layer of skin so, once healed, you’ll be looking at the ink through the top layer of skin.
  • Don’t be confrontational with the artist about your touch-up. Your artist cares as much as you do about the tattoo looking great so there’s no reason to take an aggressive posture if you have concerns about your tattoo.
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What snacks to have with a tattoo?

Should I tip my tattoo artist after every session?

Your tattoo artist devotes a lot of time and effort to each tattoo. Often, tattoo artists go the extra mile to ensure that their clients are comfortable as well as satisfied with their final product. So, the question is: should you tip your tattoo artist? The short and simple answer is, ‘ yes.

Should you shower before a tattoo?

ESSENTIAL ITEMS you NEED for a Tattoo Appointment

So you’re considering your first tattoo. That’s cool—but don’t rush it. You need time to think about what you want needled into your skin, how badly you want it, and how to get it done safely (namely, by someone who knows what they’re doing). Since there are so many things to consider before you get a tattoo, we presented a few common ink-quiries to Tiffany Tattooz, owner and tattoo artist of Ink Gallery Tattoo Shop in Woodland Park, NJ, and mainstay of Black Ink Crew on VH1.

If you’re in the market for your first ink, read through her starter’s guide. It’ll inform every decision you make about the emblem you’ll soon wear for (hopefully) the rest of your days. What are the least (and most) painful body parts to tattoo? Everyone has a different type of pain tolerance when it comes to tattoos, but most seem to experience the least amount of pain in the arm and thigh areas.

These areas of the body have more fat tissue and less nerve density, which in turn causes less discomfort. The most painful will have to be the ribs, feet, and middle chest. There is less fat, the skin is very thin, and the bone is closer to the surface of the skin, allowing one to feel the sensitivity of the needle more.

What actually happens to the skin while receiving a tattoo? Basically, ink is being deposited and penetrated into the dermis layer of the skin. The pigments are too big to be fought off by our white blood cells, so they just pretty much stay in the dermis layer of our skin forever.

How should someone prepare for a tattoo? It’s recommended that you wash the area of the skin or take a shower before coming in to get the tattoo, especially if you work with paint, construction materials, garbage, or sewage. Although it’s my job as an artist to make sure the area is cleaned, cleaning up beforehand does help reduce the risk of other unclean body parts contaminating the clean area.

On site, I always make sure to first clean the area being tattooed. I’ll then shave the customer’s skin and then spray it with alcohol to make sure the skin is fully sterile. How long do tattoos take to heal? Tattoos need about two weeks to heal, on average, although sometimes it can take more time, depending on the client’s skin and how long it took to complete the tattoo.

I tell my clients to keep the bandage on for 8-12 hours, because it allows plasma—our body’s natural way of healing itself—to regenerate skin tissue, thus allowing a quicker healing process and preventing scabbing. Once the wrap is taken off, I tell clients to use a fragrance-free antibacterial soap to wash the tattoo.

They should use lukewarm water—never hot water. However, after completely washing the tattoo, they have to pour cold water on the skin to close up the pores. How should someone care for their tattoo immediately after inking? Wash the tattoo twice a day for the first three or four days, since tattoos are pretty much an open wound at this point.

After washing the tattoo, pat it dry with a paper towel. (Don’t use a cloth towel, because cloth towels hold bacteria. ) Wait 15 minutes and then apply a light coat of moisturizing ointment with clean hands. Apply the ointment twice a day (morning and night) for two days.

Less is better: Using too much ointment will cause problems with healing and fade the tattoo, since thick ointment can clog the pores. After the second day, switch to a fragrance-free lotion and apply 3-5 times a day depending on the consistency, for up to two weeks.

Do not pick or scratch your tattoo during the healing process. Hands should always be cleaned when applying any ointment or lotion on skin. You will have to avoid being in the sun or pool for two weeks, and, most important, in order for the tattoo to stay vibrant for many years, you should always use sun block when outside.

How often do people typically need to get their tattoos touched up? It really all comes down to how they take care of their tattoos and if there were any scabs that have formed. If there were any issues during the healing process, then you will be able to tell within two weeks whether or not a tattoo needs to be touched up.

If there are no issues, then I would say a tattoo can hold up well for 10 years before seeing that it needs to be brand new again. As you get older, so does your ink. If one is always in the sun it will dull out the ink in your tattoo way sooner than someone who is never in the sun.

  1. What’s your advice to someone who isn’t sure if they should get a tattoo? Don’t do it until you wake up one day and say, “I’m ready and I know what I want;
  2. ” I never recommend someone to get a tattoo if they’re unsure of their ideas or whether or not tattoos are for them;

It’s a permanent procedure—so you want to make sure that you’re confident having something etched on you for the rest your life. If you finally find yourself ready to get tattooed, then the next big step is to find an artist who “specializes” in the “style” you want.

  • Review their portfolio to see if you like his or her work, and then you can set an appointment;
  • How do you know if your tattoo artist is legit? You can tell by their recognition, their portfolio, how long their wait is, and their prices;

How do prices vary for tattoos? Some artists charge hourly, or some charge by the piece. For larger tattoos, however, some will charge by the day (half-day sessions might be $400-600, or full-day sessions around $1,000 or more). 10. Is it easy to remove a tattoo? Painful? Laser tattoo removal is a painful process and requires many sessions. How has tattoo technology progressed in recent years?

  • Ink: There are now quality ink brands that last longer on the skin throughout the years. Some black inks are so dark, I can’t even use them for shading in a realistic tattoo—I can only use them for solid black work like tribal tattoos.
  • Machinery: New tattoo machines called “rotaries” make no sound while tattooing and feel lightweight on the wrist and hand, which decreases the chances of tendinitis and carpal tunnel for the artist. It almost feels like you’re tattooing with a pencil.
  • Cost: I now even have a “wireless power supply” to run my tattoo machine—it actually keeps track of how long I’ve spent with the client, and how long I’ve been actually “tattooing” them. This never existed nine years ago. The power supply even shows me how much my clients should pay based off the time I spent on them.
  • Needles: Previous needles required different machines to use. Now, there are needle cartridges that you can attach and detach so it can all be done from one machine.
  • Resources: Even social media, YouTube, and online podcasts have made it much easier to learn and grow as an artist quickly. The resources are enormous.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!.

How do I prepare my skin for a tattoo?

What’s the best thing to eat before a tattoo?

What Should You Eat and Drink Before a Tattoo Session – Remember that the tattoo session will cause minor damage to your skin. As a result, it is highly recommended to arrive prepared and avoid an empty stomach. Here are some essential food, vitamins, and minerals that you could consume more before getting a tattoo:

  • Vitamin C

The primary role of Vitamin C on our skin is to promote and enhance its brightness and radiance. That is why most skincare products contain such vitamins. Vitamin C is also dermatologically proven to aid in wound healing, which will benefit your tattoo and the skin itself in the long term. Vitamin C has exceptional antioxidant qualities, and it can also help in enhancing skin firmness.

  • Protein

Proteins are a type of body-building nutrients that helps your body develop and repair muscle and skin tissues. They are necessary for the formation and repair of all body parts, including the skin. Protein also helps raise the energy levels, making it a bit more beneficial for the trauma that your body system shall be going through. It will also assist your skin in recovering quickly from the stress caused by the tattoo needle; thus, it is highly recommended to eat protein-rich foods, such as beef, chicken, and seafood, before and after getting a tattoo.

  • Zinc
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Zinc also aids in skin swelling and inflammation. It’s a plus before and after a tattoo session if you take Zinc supplements or eat beans, nuts, and whole-grain breakfast.

  • Water

If you are booking a tattoo session, water is your best friend. Keep your body’s fluid levels high to keep your skin hydrated. Not only will your skin benefit from drinking lots of fluids, but your tattoo artist too. It will be easier for the needle since your skin will be a lot firmer. You’re bound to have some blood during a tattoo session, but being well-hydrated can cause your skin to bleed less, making the overall process less stressful.

Before getting your tattoo, it is an excellent idea to consume Vitamin C-rich foods such as broccoli, kale, and citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons, or you may opt to take vitamin C pills. Make sure to drink lots before, during, and after the tattoo session.

Keep yourself hydrated by drinking water, natural fruit juice, lemonade, or lime water. What To Bring To A Tattoo Appointment.

Should you shower before a tattoo?

So you’re considering your first tattoo. That’s cool—but don’t rush it. You need time to think about what you want needled into your skin, how badly you want it, and how to get it done safely (namely, by someone who knows what they’re doing). Since there are so many things to consider before you get a tattoo, we presented a few common ink-quiries to Tiffany Tattooz, owner and tattoo artist of Ink Gallery Tattoo Shop in Woodland Park, NJ, and mainstay of Black Ink Crew on VH1.

If you’re in the market for your first ink, read through her starter’s guide. It’ll inform every decision you make about the emblem you’ll soon wear for (hopefully) the rest of your days. What are the least (and most) painful body parts to tattoo? Everyone has a different type of pain tolerance when it comes to tattoos, but most seem to experience the least amount of pain in the arm and thigh areas.

These areas of the body have more fat tissue and less nerve density, which in turn causes less discomfort. The most painful will have to be the ribs, feet, and middle chest. There is less fat, the skin is very thin, and the bone is closer to the surface of the skin, allowing one to feel the sensitivity of the needle more.

  • What actually happens to the skin while receiving a tattoo? Basically, ink is being deposited and penetrated into the dermis layer of the skin;
  • The pigments are too big to be fought off by our white blood cells, so they just pretty much stay in the dermis layer of our skin forever;

How should someone prepare for a tattoo? It’s recommended that you wash the area of the skin or take a shower before coming in to get the tattoo, especially if you work with paint, construction materials, garbage, or sewage. Although it’s my job as an artist to make sure the area is cleaned, cleaning up beforehand does help reduce the risk of other unclean body parts contaminating the clean area.

  1. On site, I always make sure to first clean the area being tattooed;
  2. I’ll then shave the customer’s skin and then spray it with alcohol to make sure the skin is fully sterile;
  3. How long do tattoos take to heal? Tattoos need about two weeks to heal, on average, although sometimes it can take more time, depending on the client’s skin and how long it took to complete the tattoo;

I tell my clients to keep the bandage on for 8-12 hours, because it allows plasma—our body’s natural way of healing itself—to regenerate skin tissue, thus allowing a quicker healing process and preventing scabbing. Once the wrap is taken off, I tell clients to use a fragrance-free antibacterial soap to wash the tattoo.

They should use lukewarm water—never hot water. However, after completely washing the tattoo, they have to pour cold water on the skin to close up the pores. How should someone care for their tattoo immediately after inking? Wash the tattoo twice a day for the first three or four days, since tattoos are pretty much an open wound at this point.

After washing the tattoo, pat it dry with a paper towel. (Don’t use a cloth towel, because cloth towels hold bacteria. ) Wait 15 minutes and then apply a light coat of moisturizing ointment with clean hands. Apply the ointment twice a day (morning and night) for two days.

Less is better: Using too much ointment will cause problems with healing and fade the tattoo, since thick ointment can clog the pores. After the second day, switch to a fragrance-free lotion and apply 3-5 times a day depending on the consistency, for up to two weeks.

Do not pick or scratch your tattoo during the healing process. Hands should always be cleaned when applying any ointment or lotion on skin. You will have to avoid being in the sun or pool for two weeks, and, most important, in order for the tattoo to stay vibrant for many years, you should always use sun block when outside.

How often do people typically need to get their tattoos touched up? It really all comes down to how they take care of their tattoos and if there were any scabs that have formed. If there were any issues during the healing process, then you will be able to tell within two weeks whether or not a tattoo needs to be touched up.

If there are no issues, then I would say a tattoo can hold up well for 10 years before seeing that it needs to be brand new again. As you get older, so does your ink. If one is always in the sun it will dull out the ink in your tattoo way sooner than someone who is never in the sun.

  • What’s your advice to someone who isn’t sure if they should get a tattoo? Don’t do it until you wake up one day and say, “I’m ready and I know what I want;
  • ” I never recommend someone to get a tattoo if they’re unsure of their ideas or whether or not tattoos are for them;

It’s a permanent procedure—so you want to make sure that you’re confident having something etched on you for the rest your life. If you finally find yourself ready to get tattooed, then the next big step is to find an artist who “specializes” in the “style” you want.

Review their portfolio to see if you like his or her work, and then you can set an appointment. How do you know if your tattoo artist is legit? You can tell by their recognition, their portfolio, how long their wait is, and their prices.

How do prices vary for tattoos? Some artists charge hourly, or some charge by the piece. For larger tattoos, however, some will charge by the day (half-day sessions might be $400-600, or full-day sessions around $1,000 or more). 10. Is it easy to remove a tattoo? Painful? Laser tattoo removal is a painful process and requires many sessions. How has tattoo technology progressed in recent years?

  • Ink: There are now quality ink brands that last longer on the skin throughout the years. Some black inks are so dark, I can’t even use them for shading in a realistic tattoo—I can only use them for solid black work like tribal tattoos.
  • Machinery: New tattoo machines called “rotaries” make no sound while tattooing and feel lightweight on the wrist and hand, which decreases the chances of tendinitis and carpal tunnel for the artist. It almost feels like you’re tattooing with a pencil.
  • Cost: I now even have a “wireless power supply” to run my tattoo machine—it actually keeps track of how long I’ve spent with the client, and how long I’ve been actually “tattooing” them. This never existed nine years ago. The power supply even shows me how much my clients should pay based off the time I spent on them.
  • Needles: Previous needles required different machines to use. Now, there are needle cartridges that you can attach and detach so it can all be done from one machine.
  • Resources: Even social media, YouTube, and online podcasts have made it much easier to learn and grow as an artist quickly. The resources are enormous.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!.

How do you mentally prepare for a tattoo?