How To Do A Stick And Poke Tattoo At Home?

How To Do A Stick And Poke Tattoo At Home
Setting up the Tattoo Area –

  1. Create a clean work space, ensuring that it has been completely disinfected. Thoroughly wash the hands of the person giving the tattoo and the area that will be tattooed with warm soapy water.
  2. Shave the area with a disposable razor, if necessary.
  3. Lay out all of the tattoo supplies. Open up the needle packages and unscrew the lid of the ink.
  4. Put on medical gloves
  5. Using an alcoholic pad, clean the area to be tattooed by rubbing the alcoholic pad firmly in circles.
  6. Apply the stencil on the skin using appropriate stencil transfer gel.
  7. Allow the stencil to dry for around 5-10 minutes. If the stencil has been applied incorrectly, quickly wipe it away and apply the same stencil again. You can reuse the same stencil several times.
  8. Pour the desired colour of ink into a sterile container, perhaps a mini glass jar or cap. You can mix ink colours, diluting inks for a lighter effect and so on.

Can you use pen ink for a stick and poke?

Use India Ink – Joe Raedle/Getty Images News/Getty Images Do not use just any old ink for your stick and poke. Ink, like the ink from your pen, is not sterile and can be highly toxic. A non-toxic ink, like India ink, would be your best bet. It’s natural, carbon-based, and less likely to cause infection.

Is it safe to do a stick and poke at home?

How To: STICK AND POKE TATTOOS

The short answer is yes, stick and poke tattoos are hygienic and safe as long as they’re performed the right way with the correct equipment. – You may think it’s questionable to poke ink into your skin on your dining room table but as long as you do it responsibly, there is no reason the process should put you off.

In fact, with practice, and for non complex and small tattoos, you could achieve the same results as those you’d expect in a professional studio. Stick and pokes get a bad rep because people often use household items to perform them.

Worse yet, some do it under the influence of alcohol, meaning they don’t take the right precautions or level of care when performing them. Luckily, if you get up to date with health and safety precautions, there is no good reason you can’t start inking from the comforts of home. Here are some tips to help you on your way: How To Do A Stick And Poke Tattoo At Home Duck stick and poke tattoo by Lindsay. source.

Is it safe to give yourself a stick and poke tattoo?

Popularised by the likes of Kaia Gerber, the aesthetic has a cult-like following, without proper hygiene and care, can lead to infection and permanent scarring – If you’ve been online at all during lockdown, you’ve likely seen at least one person experimenting with DIY stick and poke tattoos  – from Instagram photos showing off new creations to model Kaia Gerber  admitting she gave herself a tattoo , images of tiny hearts, dotted lines and sentimental phrases inked into skin have been everywhere on social media.

It’s no surprise the stick and poke tattoo has become one of the most popular quarantine beauty trends. Stick and poke tattoos have an almost cult-like following. The appeal in this kind of tattoo is that they are usually small and have a handmade feel about them.

They usually look a little rough around the edges and can be created with just a sewing needle and India Ink. As one of the most accessible forms of tattooing, nearly anyone can do it and kits are just a click away on sites like Etsy and Amazon. They also usually don’t last as long as a traditional tattoo, and fade out quicker.

  1. And some people even say it’s less painful than a tattoo done with a machine;
  2. Giulia , who is based in London, is one of the many fans of the stick and poke tattoo;
  3. She originally learned of the technique when her boyfriend got a stick and poke tattoo, and then took up doing stick and poke tattoos on herself and friends, with personal advice on how to do it from tattoo artists;

“I support stick and poke as it is less painful, less invasive and it heals quicker than a normal tattoo,” she says. “To do it safely you need to know the basics of hygiene and also what helped me a lot was watching a lot of videos about it, following tattoo artists that do it, try to get as much as you can from the Internet and If you have friends that tattoo that also helps.

  • ” At the same time, as much as stick and poke tattoos are appealing for their homemade look, many professionals also caution that this is exactly the reason why you shouldn’t attempt the trend at home;

“There is something very special about a stick and poke tattoo,” says tattoo artist, Jonathan Valena, who goes by JonBoy. From Kendall Jenner to Hailey Baldwin, he specialises in tiny artful tattoos. “Getting to feel every single dot gives you a sense of accomplishment and makes you feel like you’ve earned it.

  1. On the other hand, you compromise the integrity of a clean crisp outline that can only be achieved by an electric tattoo machine;
  2. But far beyond aesthetics, while this new beauty trend coming out of lockdown may seem like one of the most exciting, it also happens to be one of the most dangerous, if not done correctly;

With many people attending salon services at home while in quarantine, experimenting with body art turns out to be a lot more risky than, say, colouring your hair pink  or trimming your bangs. Allergic reactions, infections, and mistakes that can take a lot of time and money to fix are all possible.

  1. According to doctors, ink poisoning is one of the biggest risks when trying a stick and poke tattoo at home;
  2. “At-home stick and poke tattoos are very dangerous, and carry a lot of risks,” says Dr Aragona Giuseppe, general practitioner MD;

“If you use the wrong ink or do not sanitise the needle correctly, you can get an ink poisoning infection, which can unfortunately turn into blood poisoning if not treated correctly. ” Cross-contamination is also one of the biggest reasons not to try an at-home tattoo.

  • “It is advised to avoid DIY or getting tattoos from home unless it’s from a licensed professional tattoo artist,” explains Jamie Kim MA, MS, PA-C board certified dermatology physician assistant;
  • “They are trained to avoid cross contamination and thus avoid causing infections and spreading bloodborne pathogens such as Hepatitis B and C;

Even though you might think you’re sterilising your equipment with alcohol, sometimes it’s not enough to destroy certain bacteria and viruses. There are protocols taken to make sure pathogens are sterilised before doing tattoo procedures such as using an autoclave.

” The unfortunate reality is, that with DIY kits sold at stores, professional equipment such as autoclaves are not included. Most autoclaves cost thousands of pounds, and most DIY stick and poke tattoo kits cost less than £40, and include only extremely limited safety equipment.

“Tattoo artists are trained to avoid cross contamination and thus avoid causing infections and spreading bloodborne pathogens such as Hepatitis B and C. Even though you might think you’re sterilising your equipment with alcohol, sometimes it’s not enough to destroy certain bacteria and viruses” – Jamie Kim MA, MS, PA-C board certified dermatology physician assistant With retailers selling these kits for cheap prices, some of the top tattoo artists are also against the DIY method due to the risks involved.

  1. “Believe me, I’m all about keeping the art of tattooing alive, but having easy access to the tools is very irresponsible,” adds JonBoy;
  2. “If we’ve learned anything from this pandemic we’ve learned that viruses live among us and if we’re not careful we can do more harm than not when dealing with our health;

When you are working with bloodborne pathogens it’s really crucial that you are properly trained and educated to minimise any risks of spreading any kind of bacteria or viruses. ” On the other hand, some tattoo artists believe in empowering the DIY tattoo movement with the proper knowledge.

  1. “Everyone should be able to try tattooing once if they want to, and the person they’re tattooing is consenting to it,” says Lois , a professional stick and poke tattoo artist based in London;
  2. “That being said before tattooing you have to learn basic hygiene standards for tattooing to make sure you don’t accidentally give yourself or someone else an infection;

” Lois, who has tattoos both from stick and poke and a traditional machine also prefers the stick and poke method as she finds it less painful and irritating for the skin. She also thinks they heal faster than a normal tattoo. If you’re willing to take the time to really explore the topic, acknowledge the risk involved and invest in the proper equipment.

“There’s lots of information online about how to properly set up to cleanly and safely stick and poke tattoo at-home, so everyone is able to do it if they want to. ”  At the end of the day, the DIY stick and poke tattoo is one of the world’s fastest growing and potentially most dangerous beauty trends – but the reason why it’s so appealing are obvious.

For the most part however, it’s undoubtedly safer to wait until lockdown is over and head to a professional to get your tattoo fix. “Your health is far more important than any tattoo or flex,” says Jonboy. “I would encourage you to educate yourself in the risks of handling something that could potentially scar you for life.

At the end of the day it’s really not worth it. Create a better memory going to a professional so you can be confident that you earned that permanent mark and you never have to be ashamed to show your friends or family a botched tattoo.

”  If you just can’t wait, you can also try a fake tattoo which will fade in just a few days. Inked by Dani  and Inkbox both have literally hundreds of designs that actually look realistic and pose no risk to your health. It’s also a good way to get a sense for whether or not really you want to get a permanent piece of body art once lockdown is over..

What ink do you use for DIY stick and poke?

Posted on September 07 2020 Here’s a quick fire guide for those looking to become part of the stick and poke world! Enjoy. What is a Stick and Poke? A stick and poke is a DIY way to create tattoos. it’s a modern version of what people have been doing for years, having a go at creating their very own designs! What do you need for a Stick and   Poke? You will need a needle, thread, skin, ink, and all the precautions to make it safe and sterile.

(things like boiling the needle, wearing protective gloves, using alcohol on the skin etc. ) What needle should I use? You can use a normal sewing needle but a tattoo needle works the best. We recommend not using a hollow piercing needle or a safety pin.

Try to be sensible! What ink should I use? Tattoo ink is the best, but non toxic india ink (such as Higgins, Speedball or Winsor and Newton) works well also. These are all easily available on the internet. Stay away from pen ink and inks that may be toxic.

Other inks may work, but if you want to get the most from your design and it be safe, tattoo ink is definitely the way to go. How long will these tattoos last? Depending on how deep you poked and the type of skin it was applied on, they should for a really long.

Although this is contradicts popular opinion, you should not think of these as temporary tattoos. How deep should I poke? Our opinion is that you should never exceed 1/8 of an inch. You should feel a pop of the skin while you’re doing it, when you do, don’t go much past that point.

You’ll quickly see the results if you’ve gone deep enough so don’t rush it. Don’t overdo it! You don’t want to damage the skin or bleed too much during the process. What should I do for after care? Keep it clean with anti bacterial soap.

If possible, also try to stay out of direct sunlight too. Generally, the aftercare is very similar to a professional tattoo..

Can I tattoo over Sharpie?

We’re here to shed some light on “freehand tattooing. ” In today’s age, tattoos have taken more of an artistic route. Gone are most of the dark and seedy street street shops. We’re seeing true artists master the craft of tattoo. Custom tattooing and freehand work has become the true definition of a “good shop.

” So what exactly is freehand tattooing and how does it happen? We are here to show you the process of drawing on the body and designing custom tattoos. From Sharpies to Skin freehand tattoo creation is an extraordinary art form.

A freehand tattoo is drawn on the client and then tattooed. We sketch directly on the skin with markers instead of transferring a stencil. This technique can help with the natural flow and shape of the body. This is the best way to take on curvy or angled areas.

Also, when a client wants to add to an existing tattoo, the new tattoo can be easily tailored to the empty space. There are many great reasons to draw directly on skin. let’s start with these. You get an absolute original tattoo design.

Something that no one else can have because it’s drawn directly for you. It helps artists express their ideas and it flows directly on the body shape. You can use the muscles and curves to enhance the design. You can see directly what the artist is creating.

Together you can make decisions and additions to your piece. It’s also easier to modify and erase ideas as the design progresses. Not all tattoos can be drawn on paper. Trusting your artist with a custom tattoo is a wonderful freedom.

Designing it in markers can provide a risk-free approach to concepts before getting the permanent tattoo. Here is the process in creating an original design on skin. First we cleanse the area to eliminate any natural body oils. Starting off with clean skin is always important and it allows the markers to flow gracefully.

You might be interested:  What To Clean A Tattoo With?

Next we begin the drawing with the lightest color and sketch the basic form. As the details progress we will use a variety of colored markers working from light to dark and gradually build the detail in the design.

Then to end we refine it with darker tones to ready it for the tattooing. Usually, this can take anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. Sharpies, although permanent, are easily erased with tattoo soaps or alcohol. Once the official design is created, the client and artist can inspect the areas thoroughly and make any final decisions before starting the tattoo.

Once everyone is excited about the creation we’re ready to go. The tattooing will lightly go over the on-skin drawing. As we tattoo the sharpie will gently wipe away leaving the client with a beautiful original new tattoo.

Going from Sharpie to skin offers a tattoo creation that is original and unique. It can compliment your body’s shape and create an amazing flow with the design. We strive to create on-skin whenever it can enhance a tattoos possibilities. Tattooing has become an incredible art form.

Is Bic pen ink toxic for tattoos?

Summing It Up – Pen ink is very rarely toxic and unless you ingest a lot of it, you should be fine. If some symptoms do appear, look for medical help. Play safe and don’t try any tricks with pen ink and tattoos. Not only it won’t look pretty, you can get a very bad infection and you don’t want any of that. So do try to be always careful and have fun with your inks! Back to the Blog How To Do A Stick And Poke Tattoo At Home.

Can you tattoo with pen ink?

Pen Ink – With the number of art stores and online warehouses that you can purchase from, pen ink should never be an option for tattooing. Pen ink is easily accessible and cheap. Still, it is not meant to enter your body in any way, shape, or form. Pen ink is highly toxic and unsterile.

How long do stick n pokes last?

How Long Do Stick and Poke Tattoos Last on Average? – Most stick and poke tattoos generally won’t last forever. On average, a stick and poke tattoo will last between five and ten years depending on where it is and how it’s been cared for. After this length of time, a stick and poke tattoo will generally look very washed out and faded.

  1. Hand and finger designs often fade within a few years since we wash these places regularly;
  2. Areas like the upper arms and chest will last longer if they’re not regularly exposed to sunlight;
  3. The experience of the artist is another determining factor;

With stick and poke tattoos, the artist must often repeat the lines several times for the ink to show through and stay put. Inexperienced artists may go too deep or not deep enough, causing the tattoo  to fade prematurely. Deciding whether or not to get a stick and poke tattoo isn’t easy. .

How deep do you stick and poke?

Stick and pokes are nothing new. Egyptians were doing it thousands of years ago, however recently it seems a bunch of bored students are too. Whether it’s Caitlin who wants to spice up her personality by getting a lightning bolt tattooed on her finger, or your local breather with his nickname ‘Bull’ on his bicep, stick and pokes are clearly appealing to students.

  1. But what is a stick and poke? Is it worth the cheap price for the memories and potential infections? Critic spoke to a range of students about their experiences with the party pastime;
  2. Picture this: you’re absolutely slaughtered at a flat, and someone brings out needles and a pot of ink;

You think, why wouldn’t I tattoo a portrait of Bart Simpson on my ass? It’s clearly an excellent idea. Before long, you’re having your ass grabbed by a random girl who’s jabbing at your left cheek with a needle you swore she used on your friend 10 minutes earlier. With a singular needle and pot of ink, the stick and poke method is relatively easy and cheap for anyone – especially BAs looking to ‘express themselves <3'. The needle pokes individual holes in the skin at a time, rather than a tattoo machine, which pulses the ink in rapidly. Usually for more simple designs, the stick and poke method sticks to the basics, and doesn't go nearly as deep - so don't complain it hurts, because it doesn't.

But hey, carpe diem, I guess. Rather than at a traditional parlour by a professional, it can essentially be done anywhere, at any time, by anyone. You’re just a little bitch. They can last for as long as 6 months, a year, or forever, depending on how much your artist hates you.

We spoke to Dani (@inklessdani), a student with a stick and poke side-hustle. From starting her business in early 2019, Dani began with humble materials from AliExpress. “You can get them from any tattoo shop,” she said, “but AliExpress is cheaper and is the same grade as the professional ones”.

She uses 3RL needles, which have three small prongs in the shape of a microscopic triangle that holds the ink, rather than needing to re-dip in the ink with each poke. The process involves sterilizing and shaving the subject’s skin, and then tattooing – no deeper than 2mm.

With such an easy process, Dani has given stick and pokes to dozens of people, usually friends looking to get something dumb to laugh about. “It’s not a life-long commitment, cause they don’t last forever. So, it’s for people who can take a joke, people that like don’t take things too seriously.

Y’know, some of the tattoos that I’ve done are so bad – like, you’re not gonna want to show it to your kids or anything when you’re an adult, but it’s not gonna last, so it doesn’t matter. ” When asked what her favourite stick and poke has been so far, she immediately recalled a girl wanting a stick and poke to show to the guy she claimed to have “in the bag for a root”.

She ended up having “hey x” tattooed just above her vagina, as a surprise for him when she “inevitably pulled”. “She had shaved, but dude, imagine pushing the needle down where there’s a hair already that’s been cut. Ugh. I tried to work around that,” Dani laughed.

Other than that, she’s done phrases like “Fuck it”, “Naughty”, a lot of smiley faces, star signs, and other basic stick and pokes you would have seen on Pinterest. Her one rule? No couple tattoos. “Also, practice on fruit.

Or yourself! I didn’t practice at all, just went straight for it the first time I did it. My friend didn’t really care though, but now she has two thick lines on her hip that’s definitely lasting forever. ” When Otago students were asked about their stick and poke stories, the overwhelming response was “I was drunk” or “for shits n gigs”.

From the classic sad/happy face, a wine bottle, or phad thai on their foot, the goal is to get something that’ll give you a chuckle. When asked if they’d recommend others to get one, the most popular response can be summarised as “fuck it.

Why not?” A first year student said the pain of getting his tattoo (a tree in a box) wasn’t bad at all, just a prick. Another student, who got a tattoo of smiley faces with crosses for eyes, compared the pain to “having to tell people you’re from Gore”.

  • Phad thai tattoo girl insightfully said she got hers because “I love phad thai”;
  • A young man with ‘BZY’ on his thigh described stick and pokes as “a great way to suss priorities”;
  • As something semi-permanent, the general consensus among students is that it’s a great story and university experience;

On top of that, there was a surprising amount of girls who found their foot tattoos grabbed them more dms on the down low for money. So if you’re looking to invest in a tattoo, consensus is a foot one is the way to go. In terms of aftercare, there’s only a couple of rules if you want it to stay.

  1. Don’t get it wet within the first week, so maybe bandage it with some plastic wrap;
  2. This is because you need the ink to set and for your skin to heal over it to keep it in place;
  3. On the bright side, this means if it’s really shit then you can just wash it well before the new skin heals over the wound;

Other than that, moisturise and keep it covered for the ink to do its thing. “It’s a great bonding experience, because you get to see your friends in pain,” said Dani. “They’re stupid, and meant to be stupid, so just enjoy the moment. ” The only advice our resident stick and poke artist has to say is: “I’d say go for it.

  1. Sometimes people overthink their tattoos and say ‘oh, I want a stick and poke’ and then they’ll spend hours and hours thinking about it – that’s not what it is, Y’know? Go for what you want, go for what’s on your mind, it’s not that deep;

” Overall, stick and pokes are popular for a reason. You look sick, it’s a good story, and an excuse to show your ass cheek when drunk. As an artist, you can make some money from giving them, and if you’re getting one – well, we know feet pic sales go up.

If you’re lost for ideas, go for a stalk on Instagram, or ask your mates for a doodle. Otherwise, make it gauntlet. Whoever flakes on the next night out has to get “Exit Only” above their ass crack, or whoever loses the next drinking game has to get the winner’s design on their ankle.

With so many opportunities of shitty artwork to get on your body, there’s really not many reasons not to. So, try it out. You might just love it..

What can I use as tattoo ink?

Download Article Download Article There are several ways that you can make tattoo ink. Using wood ashes and white liquor to make an organic tattoo ink is a cheap but sterile option. You can also use dry ink pigment with medical grade liquids to make a tattoo ink that mimics what tattoo artists use in their shops. Safety is important when you’re mixing tattoo ink, so make sure you wear gloves and a mask over your mouth and nose.

  1. 1 Burn wood to create ashes. In order for wood ashes to work well as a tattoo ink, you need to completely burn the wood you’re using. The ashes should be totally black, with none of the wood’s natural color still visible. They should also be completely cooled when you use them. [1]
    • Different types of wood will give you a slightly different shades of color when the ashes are used as ink. Lighter woods will produce a grayer pigment; darker woods will produce a blacker pigment.
  2. 2 Grind the ashes. Once you’ve burned the wood of your choice to create ashes, you’ll need to grind the burned wood. You want the ash particles as fine as possible so that they make a smooth and easily usable ink. Advertisement
  3. 3 Choose a clear spirit. To create tattoo ink from wood ashes, you’ll need to mix the ashes with a liquid. Some people recommend that you use distilled water, but this still risks some bacteria getting under your skin as you press the needle in. Instead, use a clear spirit – like vodka or gin – as your liquid base. [2]
  4. 4 Mix them together. Mix your ashes and clear spirit together by blending them in a blender for 10 to 20 minutes. The consistency should be a slurry – a little thicker than water, but thinner than a paste – and should not have any chunks in it. [3]
    • It’s hard to recommend an exact proportion of ashes to liquid for this, since it will depend on how finely you grind up the ashes, the type of wood you use, and the desired pigmentation of your ink. It’s better to add liquid slowly – you can always add more, but you can’t take any out.
  5. 5 Track the ash and liquid amounts. If you’re creating a larger tattoo, make sure you track the ash and liquid amounts you’re using. You’ll likely have to mix up more than one batch of ink, and knowing the exact measurements keeps the pigment of the ink consistent. [4]
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  1. 1 Choose your pigment powder. Many tattoo supply companies have pigment powder available for purchase. You’ll need to decide which color or colors you want to use and purchase those colors.
    • It’s best to purchase pigment powder from a tattoo supply company since you can be sure it’s safe. You don’t want to accidentally use pigment ink used in car paint.
  2. 2 Mix witch hazel with propylene glycol and medical grade glycerin. When using pigment powder, you’ll need to add it to medical grade liquids. Mix together 2 pints (32 ounces) of witch hazel (which you can get from most holistic health stores or online), 2 ¼ teaspoons (0. 38 ounces) of medical grade glycerin and 2 ¼ teaspoons propylene glycol to form a liquid base.
  3. 3 Add the pigment powder. Once your liquid base is mixed, add your pigment powder. The amount of pigment powder you use will depend on how bright or subdued you want the color to be. Add the pigment powder slowly – again, you can always add more but you can’t take any out.
  4. 4 Mix in a blender. To mix your ink together, put it in a blender at low speed. If you find your ink is too thick, add a bit more liquid. If it’s too thin, add more pigment. Once your ink reaches your desired consistency, turn the speed up to medium and mix your ink for about an hour.
  5. 5 Store in a sterile container. Once your ink is finished, store it in a sterile, airtight container. You should place the container in a cool, dark place.
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  1. 1 Gather your supplies. To apply your homemade ink at home, you’ll need a few supplies: a few very fine sewing needles, a #2 pencil, a ballpoint pen, some sewing thread, matches, and alcohol swabs. You’ll also need your ink!
  2. 2 Wash your hands. Before you begin to give yourself a tattoo with your homemade ink, make sure you thoroughly wash your hands. This means washing your hands well, with soap, for at least two minutes.
    • For some extra cleansing, you can also wipe your hands with an alcohol wipe after you’ve washed them.
  3. 3 Make your needle. You’ll want to prepare your needle for applying your homemade ink by attaching it to a longer handle. This gives you more control over the movement of the needle and makes tattooing easier. Insert the eye end of your thin needle into the eraser of the #2 pencil.
    • You might want to wrap the thread with some tape to give it extra support and make sure it doesn’t move.
  4. 4 Heat your needle. Once you’ve got your needle put together, you’ll need to heat the tip up. Light a match and hold the needle over it for ten to fifteen seconds. Make sure you turn the needle so it heats evenly. Heating the tip of the needle kills any germs on the needle. This can prevent infection when the needle goes under your skin to apply the ink.
  5. 5 Draw your design. Use an alcohol swab to clean the area of your skin where you want to apply your tattoo. Then, using the ballpoint pen, draw on your design.
    • If you’ve never done your own tattoo before, you might want to start with a small design.
    • You should practice your design on paper before you draw on your skin.
  6. 6 Ink your needle. Once you’re satisfied with your design placement and style, it’s time to ink your needle. Simply dip your needle into your homemade ink. Gently tap the needle on the side of the jar or its lid to remove any excess ink. You don’t want the needle to be dripping with ink.
  7. 7 Apply the ink to your skin. Once you’ve got ink on your needle, poke the needle into your skin at any point in your design. To make sure the ink actually stays in your skin, you’ll need to poke through the first two layers of skin. Continue this process along the lines of your design.
    • Your skin may bleed occasionally when you poke the needle through. Some bleeding is normal, but if you notice a lot of blood, stop immediately.
    • You’ll need to reload your needle with ink occasionally. If you notice that the ink color is fading, reload the needle.
  8. 8 Take care of your tattoo. After you’ve finished your tattoo, you should wipe it down gently with water and mild soap and apply anti-bacterial ointment. If your tattoo is in a place that is likely to rub against your clothing, wrap it with clear plastic wrap. Once you unwrap it, clean it with soap and water, but don’t use a cloth. [5]
    • In the days after your tattoo is finished, you might notice your skin dries out quite a bit. This is normal. Just use a bit of fragrance-free moisturizer and rub it gently over your tattoo.
  9. 9 Touch up the design of your tattoo. Your skin will swell when you repeatedly poke it with a needle. Once you’ve finished your tattoo and your skin has had time to heal, you might notice that you’ve missed a few spots. Simply go back and repeat the tattooing process to touch up the areas that you missed.
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Add New Question

  • Question Will this ink be able to last up to a year? The maximum that this tattoo ink will probably last up to is maybe 8 months. But it all depends on how you make it, and how you use it, and where you put it. If you put it on your back, which will probably be covered up by your shirt, it will more likely last longer than if you have it all on your arm.
  • Question If I don’t have a blender, what do I do? This may make it a bit harder, but you can try to beat it with a spoon. It will take longer, and it may not make the ink mix last as long. Otherwise, it is okay to use a spoon!
  • Question Can I make tattoo ink from store-bought charcoal? Killian Campbell Community Answer You can, but it won’t last long. If you buy a good and more expensive brand with lots of phosphates, it will last longer than the cheaper brands.
  • Question Is it actually permanent or will it go away within a year? It’s actually semi-permanent and will fade away in a year, more or less. If you want it to last less time, you can try henna tattoos.

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  • In the days after your tattoo is complete, you might notice that scabs form, and that your tattoo might bleed a bit. This is normal. Don’t peel the scabs off – they’ll come off naturally in subsequent cleanings.
  • Your tattoo will remain swollen and sore for a few days. It might also feel warm to the touch. This is normal.

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  • Make sure you’re using ink pigment created specifically for tattoos. Some websites will sell ink pigment without noting that they’re actually for things like car paint. Buying your pigment from tattoo websites is the safest route.
  • If your tattoo stays red and swollen and sore more than 2 days or so, seek medical attention. You might be having an adverse reaction to the tattoo.
  • Use gloves and a mask when you’re mixing tattoo ink.

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What can I use for a stick and poke?

Does Stick N poke hurt?

There Is No Consensus On Stick & Poke Pain – There is no general consensus on whether or not stick and pokes are more painful than needle gun tattoos. It seems to be differ anecdotally and probably has a lot to do with your tattoo placement and your own personal pain threshold.

Can I tattoo with eyeliner ink?

Download Article Download Article If you’re not ready for the life-long commitment of a real tattoo, or if you’re too young to start inking your skin, you can still get creative with body art! A temporary tattoo is also a great way to see how much you’ll like a design you might be thinking of getting. With just a little inspiration and some basic makeup products, you can make your own authentic looking temporary tattoo for whatever purpose you desire.

  1. 1 Find your design. The internet is an endless resource for tattoo ideas. If you don’t want to draw your own design, you can search “tattoo stencils,” “tattoo ideas,” or “flash art” to find plenty of images you can use for inspiration or to copy for your temporary tattoo.
    • Search for your favorite cartoon characters, symbols, phrases, foods, and more. Any of these can become a cool new temporary tattoo!
    • Embroidery patterns are perfect models for your temporary tattoo. These designs are often simple, cute, and usually on the smaller side, which will transfer more easily to your body.
    • Try to avoid designs that are overly complex or detailed. Simple designs with bold lines generally translate well into tattoos. Designs with shading or intricate lines can be difficult to transfer. [1]
  2. 2 Determine the placement of your tattoo. If you are drawing the tattoo on yourself, make sure you choose a part of body you can easily reach. However, you could always ask an artistic friend to “ink” you, which will give you more flexibility when it comes to placement. You might want to avoid tattoos that require in you to be in weird or uncomfortable positions. If you start shaking while the ink is being applied, the design could be ruined!
    • Places on your body where clothing rubs can decrease the time your temporary tattoo lasts. The friction caused by your clothing rubbing against the tattoo will wear away the tattoo over time. Your forearm or calf are good options to consider for tattoo placement.
    • Keep in mind that skin that is constantly moving and stretching, and in some places your skin moves more than others, like on the back of the hand. This can cause your tattoo to fade or crack very quickly.

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  3. 3 Choose an eyeliner for inking. Liquid eyeliner will give you the boldest lines and will have the most realistic look. An eyeliner pencil can also work, especially for freehand drawn temporary tattoos, though these may appear more like a crayon drawn on your skin. You should consider using liquid liners with felt-tipped applicators for outlining, then you can use pencils for shading.
    • Waterproof eyeliner is probably the best option for your temporary tattoo. This kind of ink will last longer and is less prone to smudging if you sweat or it gets wet.
    • When using pencils, you can vary the pressure you use to create shading on your skin. After you apply your liquid liner outline, you can use these to give your temporary tattoo a unique character. [2] [3]
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  1. 1 Print or draw your design on a piece of paper. This will be the template for your tattoo. Make sure the image is clear so you can trace it easily. It should be the exact size you desire it to be on your skin. If the image you choose isn’t symmetrical, you’ll have to print or draw it mirrored so it transfers to your skin properly.
    • If you find drawing the mirror image of your design too difficult freehand, you can use a computer to reverse the image. Copy your tattoo design into an image editing program, like Adobe Photoshop or MS Paint, and flip it along its vertical axis.
    • If you are more artistically inclined, or have a friend willing to help you who is, you could also draw the outline of your tattoo directly on your skin in waterproof liquid eyeliner or with a eyeliner pencil with a fine point. If you plan on inking yourself in this way, once the outline is finished, you can move on to adding color or shading to your design. [4]
  2. 2 Trace the outline of your design. To ensure that your traced lines match up with your template, you might want to tape your template design to your tracing paper. This way if you are jostled or the paper sticks to your hand, the template and tracing paper will stay lined up. Wax paper or parchment paper work well as transfer paper. [5]
    • Make the outline of your image dark and thick. This will make it easier for you to follow the outline with your eyeliner, which you then transfer to your skin.
  3. 3 Cut your outline into a manageable piece of paper. It might be difficult to transfer your image if your sheet of wax/parchment paper is too large. Trim down your paper with a pair of scissors so that only the design and a small margin of wax/parchment paper around the outline remain.
    • At this point, you might want to check and see how your design will look on the part of your body part you plan to apply your tattoo. Drape your wax/parchment paper outline side down on that body part. You should be able to see through the paper to preview how it will look. [6]
  4. 4 Apply liquid eyeliner to the outline. You’ll have to do this quickly, as the eyeliner dries rapidly. Follow the marker outline of your design with a generous application of liquid eyeliner until you have completely traced it with liquid eye liner. [7]
    • An eyeliner pencil can also be used to transfer your outline to your skin. Be sure you apply a heavy layer of pencil liner when re-tracing your wax paper outline. The heavier your layer of pencil liner, the better the transfer will be.
  5. 5 Transfer the outline of your design to your skin. Lay the still wet liquid eyeliner (or heavily drawn pencil liner) on the part of your body you plan to tattoo. Press it into place on your skin, then take a washcloth or rag dampened with warm water and press it firmly to the back of your wax/parchment paper for at least 10 seconds.
    • When you peel the wax/parchment paper free, the outline of your design should be applied to your skin. Allow your skin to air dry. [8]
  6. 6 Darken your outline with black eyeliner. Waterproof liquid eyeliner is best for outlining. This will create a long lasting, realistic looking, smudge resistant design. Work with care, but don’t worry if you make a mistake. Any errors can be fixed.
    • If you don’t have liquid eyeliner, make sure your eyeliner pencil is very sharp so you can get clean, smudge-free lines.
    • If you want to draw thin or fine lines or details, a toothpick can work well as a fine-point applicator. Dip the end of a toothpick into your liquid liner and carefully use it to add details to your temporary tattoo.
    • If you make a mistake, dip a cotton swab in makeup remover. You’ll have to use an oil-based makeup remover for waterproof liners. Squeeze out excess liquid from the swab and then use it to wipe away any mistakes. Allow the area to dry again, then re-draw over the mistake if necessary. [9]
  7. 7 Add color or shading once the outline is dry. You can use colored eyeliner to add a pop of color to your tattoo or a blunt eyeliner pencil for shading. You can the shaded effect by blending it with a small, stiff makeup brush.
    • If you want an authentic looking solid black tattoo that lasts a long time and doesn’t smudge, use waterproof liquid liner to fill in your stencil. It will be very dark and striking.
    • If you want to add color, try a colored eyeliner or even eyeshadow. Anything with sparkles won’t look very natural, but it can glam-up your tattoo.
  8. 8 Dust the dried tattoo with translucent powder. This will set the ink on your skin and give it extra protection from smudging throughout the day. If you don’t have translucent makeup powder, you can use a talcum powder or baby powder. [10]
  9. 9 Defend your tattoo with an application of hairspray or liquid bandage. This will keep moisture from deteriorating your tattoo and further prevent any smudging that might occur. Aerosol sprays are the easiest to apply, but if you only have the liquid bandage that brushes on, you can use that as well. [11]
    • Your protective layer can sometimes leave your temporary tattoo looking shiny. If this is the case for you, return it to a more natural appearance by dusting the area with another layer of translucent makeup powder, talcum powder, or baby powder. [12]
    • Try to avoid exercising, swimming, or sweating too much. Your tattoo probably won’t last longer than a day, but avoiding these activities will keep it looking its best for as long as possible.
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  1. 1 Use makeup remover to remove the eyeliner from your skin. For some eyeliners, soap and water may wash off your design. Others will be more resistant, or leave behind faint traces. Waterproof eyeliner, especially, will likely need a special oil-based makeup remover to be removed cleanly. [13]
    • If you don’t have makeup remover, you can try using other common household products. Some effective options include olive oil, coconut oil, or petroleum jelly.
    • When wiping your temporary tattoo off, use paper towel, tissue, or a disposable cotton pad. Otherwise you might end up staining your towels or washcloths.
  2. 2 Rinse and hydrate the area after removal. There may be some makeup residue even after you apply your removing agent. If this does not wash away easily, you may need to apply more remover to your tattoo. After you rinse, apply some moisturizer to your skin. [14]
    • The ingredients used in makeup can be harsh on your skin, especially if left on your skin for long periods of time. Replenish your skin by using a moisturizer after rinsing.
  3. 3 Remove your tattoo before going to sleep. Leaving your makeup on overnight can cause irritation or damage to your skin. [15] Additionally, over the course of the night your temporary tattoo might rub off on and stain your sheets.
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Add New Question

  • Question How long does the temporary tattoo last? The amount of time your temporary tattoo lasts will depend on the kind of eyeliner you use, the part of the body you’ve applied it to, and environmental factors, like humidity, sweat, and friction. High quality eyeliners can last up to 24 hours in moisture rich environments. If kept dry and away from friction (like the rubbing of clothes), your tattoo could last several days.
  • Question What can be used than hairspray and liquid bandage? Lotion will help to preserve it longer.
  • Question Do I have to use the spray? The spray helps it stay and last longer without smearing, so it is a good idea to spray it.
  • Question Does the place where the tattoo is kept after removed get black? If you remove the tattoo properly, it shouldn’t. If it does, use and oil-based eye makeup remover.
  • Question Is there anyway to keep it overnight without damaging my skin? If you have sensitive skin, use a natural eyeliner instead of a chemical one. The tattoo should last a couple of days without your skin suffering. You can also get hairspray for sensitive skin (to hold the tattoo in place). Use a waterproof bandaid to protect the tattoo while showering.
  • Question Which eyeliner is best for a temporary tattoo? Any brand should work fine, but try to find a waterproof eyeliner.
  • Question Will other people notice it’s a fake tattoo? It depends on how well you make it and how closely people examine it. If someone calls you on it being fake, just say that you were thinking about getting one and wanted to see how it would look first.
  • Question Is there a baby powder substitute? You could try a translucent powder or a very fine powder like flour, but it has to be very thin and preferably white or translucent.
  • Question I did this with a pen in place of eyeliner. Would it wash off the same? Pen will probably be more difficult to scrub off, but should come off with soap and water.
  • Question Can I not use powder but use hairspray/waterproof band-aid instead? Or will that make it smudge? Marwa Shaban Ali Community Answer Yes, hairspray will work if you don’t have powder. And don’t forget to remove the tattoo before sleeping, if you forget then it can cause damage to your skin.

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How do I make homemade tattoo ink?

Can you stick and poke with food coloring?

Food Coloring. This is one of the rarely used stick and poke ink alternatives, but we had to include it since more and more people seem to be trying it out.

How long do stick and pokes last with pen ink?

How Long Do Stick and Poke Tattoos Last on Average? – Most stick and poke tattoos generally won’t last forever. On average, a stick and poke tattoo will last between five and ten years depending on where it is and how it’s been cared for. After this length of time, a stick and poke tattoo will generally look very washed out and faded.

  1. Hand and finger designs often fade within a few years since we wash these places regularly;
  2. Areas like the upper arms and chest will last longer if they’re not regularly exposed to sunlight;
  3. The experience of the artist is another determining factor;

With stick and poke tattoos, the artist must often repeat the lines several times for the ink to show through and stay put. Inexperienced artists may go too deep or not deep enough, causing the tattoo  to fade prematurely. Deciding whether or not to get a stick and poke tattoo isn’t easy. .

What can be used as tattoo ink?

Download Article Download Article There are several ways that you can make tattoo ink. Using wood ashes and white liquor to make an organic tattoo ink is a cheap but sterile option. You can also use dry ink pigment with medical grade liquids to make a tattoo ink that mimics what tattoo artists use in their shops. Safety is important when you’re mixing tattoo ink, so make sure you wear gloves and a mask over your mouth and nose.

  1. 1 Burn wood to create ashes. In order for wood ashes to work well as a tattoo ink, you need to completely burn the wood you’re using. The ashes should be totally black, with none of the wood’s natural color still visible. They should also be completely cooled when you use them. [1]
    • Different types of wood will give you a slightly different shades of color when the ashes are used as ink. Lighter woods will produce a grayer pigment; darker woods will produce a blacker pigment.
  2. 2 Grind the ashes. Once you’ve burned the wood of your choice to create ashes, you’ll need to grind the burned wood. You want the ash particles as fine as possible so that they make a smooth and easily usable ink. Advertisement
  3. 3 Choose a clear spirit. To create tattoo ink from wood ashes, you’ll need to mix the ashes with a liquid. Some people recommend that you use distilled water, but this still risks some bacteria getting under your skin as you press the needle in. Instead, use a clear spirit – like vodka or gin – as your liquid base. [2]
  4. 4 Mix them together. Mix your ashes and clear spirit together by blending them in a blender for 10 to 20 minutes. The consistency should be a slurry – a little thicker than water, but thinner than a paste – and should not have any chunks in it. [3]
    • It’s hard to recommend an exact proportion of ashes to liquid for this, since it will depend on how finely you grind up the ashes, the type of wood you use, and the desired pigmentation of your ink. It’s better to add liquid slowly – you can always add more, but you can’t take any out.
  5. 5 Track the ash and liquid amounts. If you’re creating a larger tattoo, make sure you track the ash and liquid amounts you’re using. You’ll likely have to mix up more than one batch of ink, and knowing the exact measurements keeps the pigment of the ink consistent. [4]
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  1. 1 Choose your pigment powder. Many tattoo supply companies have pigment powder available for purchase. You’ll need to decide which color or colors you want to use and purchase those colors.
    • It’s best to purchase pigment powder from a tattoo supply company since you can be sure it’s safe. You don’t want to accidentally use pigment ink used in car paint.
  2. 2 Mix witch hazel with propylene glycol and medical grade glycerin. When using pigment powder, you’ll need to add it to medical grade liquids. Mix together 2 pints (32 ounces) of witch hazel (which you can get from most holistic health stores or online), 2 ¼ teaspoons (0. 38 ounces) of medical grade glycerin and 2 ¼ teaspoons propylene glycol to form a liquid base.
  3. 3 Add the pigment powder. Once your liquid base is mixed, add your pigment powder. The amount of pigment powder you use will depend on how bright or subdued you want the color to be. Add the pigment powder slowly – again, you can always add more but you can’t take any out.
  4. 4 Mix in a blender. To mix your ink together, put it in a blender at low speed. If you find your ink is too thick, add a bit more liquid. If it’s too thin, add more pigment. Once your ink reaches your desired consistency, turn the speed up to medium and mix your ink for about an hour.
  5. 5 Store in a sterile container. Once your ink is finished, store it in a sterile, airtight container. You should place the container in a cool, dark place.
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  1. 1 Gather your supplies. To apply your homemade ink at home, you’ll need a few supplies: a few very fine sewing needles, a #2 pencil, a ballpoint pen, some sewing thread, matches, and alcohol swabs. You’ll also need your ink!
  2. 2 Wash your hands. Before you begin to give yourself a tattoo with your homemade ink, make sure you thoroughly wash your hands. This means washing your hands well, with soap, for at least two minutes.
    • For some extra cleansing, you can also wipe your hands with an alcohol wipe after you’ve washed them.
  3. 3 Make your needle. You’ll want to prepare your needle for applying your homemade ink by attaching it to a longer handle. This gives you more control over the movement of the needle and makes tattooing easier. Insert the eye end of your thin needle into the eraser of the #2 pencil.
    • You might want to wrap the thread with some tape to give it extra support and make sure it doesn’t move.
  4. 4 Heat your needle. Once you’ve got your needle put together, you’ll need to heat the tip up. Light a match and hold the needle over it for ten to fifteen seconds. Make sure you turn the needle so it heats evenly. Heating the tip of the needle kills any germs on the needle. This can prevent infection when the needle goes under your skin to apply the ink.
  5. 5 Draw your design. Use an alcohol swab to clean the area of your skin where you want to apply your tattoo. Then, using the ballpoint pen, draw on your design.
    • If you’ve never done your own tattoo before, you might want to start with a small design.
    • You should practice your design on paper before you draw on your skin.
  6. 6 Ink your needle. Once you’re satisfied with your design placement and style, it’s time to ink your needle. Simply dip your needle into your homemade ink. Gently tap the needle on the side of the jar or its lid to remove any excess ink. You don’t want the needle to be dripping with ink.
  7. 7 Apply the ink to your skin. Once you’ve got ink on your needle, poke the needle into your skin at any point in your design. To make sure the ink actually stays in your skin, you’ll need to poke through the first two layers of skin. Continue this process along the lines of your design.
    • Your skin may bleed occasionally when you poke the needle through. Some bleeding is normal, but if you notice a lot of blood, stop immediately.
    • You’ll need to reload your needle with ink occasionally. If you notice that the ink color is fading, reload the needle.
  8. 8 Take care of your tattoo. After you’ve finished your tattoo, you should wipe it down gently with water and mild soap and apply anti-bacterial ointment. If your tattoo is in a place that is likely to rub against your clothing, wrap it with clear plastic wrap. Once you unwrap it, clean it with soap and water, but don’t use a cloth. [5]
    • In the days after your tattoo is finished, you might notice your skin dries out quite a bit. This is normal. Just use a bit of fragrance-free moisturizer and rub it gently over your tattoo.
  9. 9 Touch up the design of your tattoo. Your skin will swell when you repeatedly poke it with a needle. Once you’ve finished your tattoo and your skin has had time to heal, you might notice that you’ve missed a few spots. Simply go back and repeat the tattooing process to touch up the areas that you missed.
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Add New Question

  • Question Will this ink be able to last up to a year? The maximum that this tattoo ink will probably last up to is maybe 8 months. But it all depends on how you make it, and how you use it, and where you put it. If you put it on your back, which will probably be covered up by your shirt, it will more likely last longer than if you have it all on your arm.
  • Question If I don’t have a blender, what do I do? This may make it a bit harder, but you can try to beat it with a spoon. It will take longer, and it may not make the ink mix last as long. Otherwise, it is okay to use a spoon!
  • Question Can I make tattoo ink from store-bought charcoal? Killian Campbell Community Answer You can, but it won’t last long. If you buy a good and more expensive brand with lots of phosphates, it will last longer than the cheaper brands.
  • Question Is it actually permanent or will it go away within a year? It’s actually semi-permanent and will fade away in a year, more or less. If you want it to last less time, you can try henna tattoos.

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  • In the days after your tattoo is complete, you might notice that scabs form, and that your tattoo might bleed a bit. This is normal. Don’t peel the scabs off – they’ll come off naturally in subsequent cleanings.
  • Your tattoo will remain swollen and sore for a few days. It might also feel warm to the touch. This is normal.

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  • Make sure you’re using ink pigment created specifically for tattoos. Some websites will sell ink pigment without noting that they’re actually for things like car paint. Buying your pigment from tattoo websites is the safest route.
  • If your tattoo stays red and swollen and sore more than 2 days or so, seek medical attention. You might be having an adverse reaction to the tattoo.
  • Use gloves and a mask when you’re mixing tattoo ink.

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What can I use for a stick and poke?

How do you get pen ink to stay on your skin?

You can flex your artistic muscle and give yourself a tattoo with some simple items stashed away in your house. No, not ink and a pin for an ill-advised stick-and-poke. More like toothpaste and a pen for a sick tat. That’s right, commitment haters: This artistic ink is only temporary.

This viral YouTube tutorial, which has more than 38 million views, demonstrates how to use a pen and toothpaste (plus a few extras) to make a DIY temporary tattoo. While the hack is basically made for a boring quarantine-night-in, the DIY temporary ink is also perfect for testing out new tattoo designs before you call up your choice parlor for the real deal.

Plus, the result is waterproof and all. As the video outlines, the first step is to prep the to-be-inked area by shaving it clean of hair. Then, apply a thick layer of toothpaste to the skin and rub it in. This minty step is said to remove excess oil from the skin and reportedly helps the longevity of your temporary ink.

The video recommends Colgate toothpaste, though it’s unclear if the particular brand has any effect on the final product. After wiping the excess toothpaste off, grab a marker-like pen and get to sketching your ink.

Once you are happy with the design, dust it with face powder or baby powder. This particular tutorial then goes over the design again in waterproof eyeliner for extra staying power, dusting it once more for good measure. To lock the resulting ink in even further, apply one super thin layer of Vaseline, which is known for repelling water.

After drying for 30 minutes, your tattoo is ready to be put through the wringer. That includes pools, showers, gym sessions, and whatever other trouble you could get into. Think temporary tattoos are only for little kids and Coachella baddies? Think again.

Watch the tat tutorial for yourself below: Katie Dupere is an editor and writer in New York City specializing in identity, internet culture, social good, lifestyle and beauty topics..