How To Cover Up A Tattoo For Work?

How To Cover Up A Tattoo For Work
How to Cover a Tattoo for Work

  1. Cover the fresh ink with loose clothing.
  2. Hide neck and upper back tattoos with long hair.
  3. Use scarves or shawls to cover neck and shoulder tats.
  4. Wear long socks or tights for ankle and leg tats.
  5. Use jewelry or accessories to hide small tattoos.
  6. Wrap the tattoo in gauze.

What can I use to cover my tattoo at work?

Can you temporarily cover up a tattoo?

Step 5: Apply Concealer – Choose a concealer that is closest to your skin tone and apply it with a beauty blender. You will likely have to mix a few colors together to get the right tone. Repeat this until your tattoo is completely covered and the area matches the surrounding skin.

What is the easiest way to cover a tattoo?

Do you have to cover up tattoos for work?

How To Cover Up A Tattoo For Work Credit: David Clifton While some tattoos are expressly designed and chosen to be proudly displayed for the world to ogle at all times, you might choose to have that body art gets kept concealed, either occasionally or consistently. The rationale for covering up could be a stringent office dress code or a particular professional function. Maybe it’s a tattoo that you got eons ago, loved for years, but are now a bit more ambivalent about revealing to strangers on the daily. Or, perhaps it’s an ink-averse relative (more on that in a moment).

Whatever the reasoning, good news: there’s extremely effective make-up options for achieving true full-coverage on the market these days. Another appealing route to covering up when you need or want to? Some equally successful styling hacks for concealing a design, no technical make-up application required, and probably involving some items you already have in your wardrobe.

Ahead, a beauty editor with personal insights on the ins and outs of covering up her multiple tattoos, make-up artist, and medical pro share savvy tricks. Whether you’d rather utilize an ultra-opaque concealer or a chic capelet to keep your body art under wraps when the situation or company you’re keeping merits doing so, one thing’s for sure: No one will be the wiser about your carefully concealed body art.

Can I put Saran Wrap on my tattoo for work?

According to tattooist Harv Angel, caring for a new tattoo begins before the needle touches skin. His first piece of advice to anyone looking to get their first tattoo or add some new ink to a collection: Do your research. “Make sure that you’re not getting tattoo in somebody’s carport or their kitchen or their spare bedroom.

Go to a licensed tattooer, somebody’s who certified, somebody who has a track record,” he explained. Angel has been on island since 1977 and a serious tattooist since 1982, he says. Low Tide Tattoo, which his business cards bill as “Guam’s Only Fully Certified Tattoo Shop,” opened in its Tumon location across from the Pacific Island Club in 2001.

The point of doing research before getting a new tattoo is to ensure that a tattooist is using clean, safe practices. “Make sure they’re using aseptic procedures,” Angel explained. “Make sure that they’re using disposable needles, disposable tubes. Make sure that they’re wearing gloves — and not just latex gloves, because some people are allergic to latex.

You wanna use Nitrile (gloves). ” PIKA:  Family gets matching tattoos to honor late father PIKA: Tips for those getting their first tattoos When your new tattoo is done, it will need to be wrapped up with a sterile bandage or absorbent covering.

“Never let a tattooer wrap your tattoo in Saran wrap,” Angel warned. “Saran wrap does not absorb the blood and other body fluids that come from a fresh tattoo. So you want, you want the tattoo wrapped in a sterile bandage, something that’s absorbent. Saran wrap is a no-no.

  • ” And the tattoo shouldn’t stay covered for too long;
  • “Tattoo care is gonna vary a little bit from shop to shop, y’know?” he advised;
  • “Generally, you leave the tattoo wrapped up for at least a couple of hours;

And after removing the sterile bandage, you wash the tattoo — soap and water. It doesn’t matter what kind of soap. ” When drying off a new tattoo, make sure to pat it dry. “You don’t wipe it dry,” Angel said. A tattooist may give some ointment for new tattoos, or you can buy A&D ointment, Neosporin or Bacitracin over the counter.

There are specialized tattoo-care products like the H2Ocean brand, but Angel doesn’t think it’s necessary to spend that kind of money. Angel said he’s even heard of people using Listerine or Preparation H, though he couldn’t say he would recommend those.

No matter what product is used, people with new tattoos should remember to keep their hands clean before touching the tattoo. Angel also advised against using too much ointment: “You wanna put (the ointment) on thin. You don’t glob it on real thick. ‘Cause if you put it on real thick, that keeps air from getting to the tattoo. “There’s probably going to be a little scabbing, similar to — I tell people, similar to like a peeling sunburn,” Angel said. “It’s not a thick scab, but there’s going to probably be a little bit of scabbing. That’s not something you want to pick or scratch at. ” The best advice is to use common sense and mostly leave the new tattoo alone. “Don’t turn it into some difficult science project,” Angel said.

And air’s a real important component to the healing process. ” Expect your tattoo to ooze some fluids, including blood and ink, and then to scab over. “It’s not like you’re healing up after open-heart surgery.

It is a wound — it’s a controlled wound, if you want to look at this way. ” For those particularly worried about infection, make sure to do research, but also relax. Angel has been in the business for over three decades and has never seen a tattoo go bad.

“In all the years I’ve been in tattoo shops and tattooing, I’ve never seen an infected tattoo,” he said. Aside from germs, there are other things new tattoos should be protected from. “Sun is the worst thing for your skin, it’s the worst thing for tattoos.

Look what the sun does to car paint. You should never sunburn yourself. Stay out of the sun. You want to show off your tattoo, but you don’t want to sunburn it,” Angel said. Angel said people with tattoos eventually find a routine that suits them. “After you get several tattoos, you find a routine that works well for you,” Angel said, “‘cause you’re going to hear different things from different tattooers.

Can I wrap my tattoo with paper towel?

Tattoo aftercare starts the moment you leave the tattoo shop. Once the tattoo is done, the artist will apply a thin layer of Grumpy Bosco’s E-Ointment (or A&D ointment) over the entire tattooed area. Your artist will then cover the area completely with plastic wrap or a bandage (paper towel is normal).

  • This covering protects the open skin from bacteria, sunlight, and from rubbing against clothing;
  • As tempting as it can be to remove the protective cover to look at the tattoo, the bandage or plastic wrap should stay on for at least an hour after the process;

The length of time will depend on the size and location of the tattoo. Plastic wrap must be removed within 2 hours. Bandage can stay longer but may be stuck to the tattooed area. DO NOT pull it off. Wet the backing of the bandage with warm water to remove easily.

After a thorough hand-washing with antibacterial soap (dish soap is fine), a person can gently wash the tattoo with antibacterial soap and warm water. The ointment on the skin will come off, and the tattoo may appear as if it is oozing ink or a thick, sticky substance.

This reaction is not cause for concern; it’s just the excess fluid and ink from the tattoo process. After washing, pat the skin with a clean paper towel and allow it to air-dry for up to an hour. When the area is completely dry, apply a very thin layer of Grumpy Bosco’s E-Ointment (or A&D ointment) to the tattoo, and leave it uncovered to allow the skin to breathe.

Repeat this process at least 3 times daily. We highly recommend Grumpy Bosco’s E-Ointment. If you can’t find it, use A&D Ointment. Products like Aquaphor, Lubriderm, Aveeno, Curel, Eucerin etc. are discouraged by this shop.

Use them at your own risk. Note:   Always wash first and keep your dirty fingers off of it (this accounts for of 98% of infections). ​ DO NOT apply ointment over an existing layer! WASH IT FIRST! No excessive alcohol use for 24 hours. No pool, No hot tub, No saltwater for at least 10 days.

Can you cover a black tattoo?

What to Do If You Want to Add Color Over Black Ink – This is where things get a bit more complicated. The brighter the colors the more of a challenge it can be. Navy blue is one thing, but hot pink? That’s a whole other story. That said, you’re not without recourse, you just need to approach the tattoo in a whole new way.

  1. For starters, you will need to fade the black tattoo to prepare for a cover-up;
  2. This can be effectively accomplished through laser tattoo fading (vs outright removal);
  3. In this case state-of-the-art laser technology will be employed to break apart the black ink particles to the point that they become noticeably lighter;
You might be interested:  How Often Should You Clean A New Tattoo?

The brighter the colors you want to add for your new tattoo the greater number of laser fading sessions will be required. Yes, this adds to the length of time (months in most cases) it will take before your skin will be prepared to receive the new and preferred tattoo, but it’s worth the investment.

How much does it cost to remove a tattoo?

Types of tattoo removal

Method Average cost Sessions
Surgical removal $200-$1,500, based on anecdotal reports 1, though larger tattoos may require more
Dermabrasion several hundred to thousands of dollars, according to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery 1

.

How long does tattoo concealer last?

Dermablend’s tattoo cover up makeup can last up to 16 hours when used with our the Loose Setting Powder.

What color concealer covers black tattoos?

For dark colored tattoos, you may consider using a color corrector such as Quick Fix™ Color-Correcting Powder Pigments on top of the tattoo before applying makeup. Use orange over areas of blue or faded tattoos and red for deep black ink. This will ensure the actual coverage is faster and more effective.

Is there a cream to remove tattoos?

What’s in a Tattoo Removal Cream?How To Cover Up A Tattoo For Work – There are a variety of tattoo removal creams on the market. The most trusted, popular products tend to include at least one of two important active ingredients: Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and hydroquinone. TCA removes the top layer of skin and penetrates some of the underlying layers to effectively remove most of that tattoo ink.

How can I make my tattoo fade faster?

Download Article Download Article While results can be mixed, there are a couple of ways to reduce the appearance of unwanted tattoos without resorting to surgery. Your best bet is to begin daily applications of a mild skin-lightening agent like hydrogen peroxide or lemon juice. If you’re looking for a faster, more direct approach, you could also try exfoliating the tattoo thoroughly 2-3 times a day with a homemade salt scrub or similar abrasive mixture.

  1. 1 Use common household items to lighten your tattooed skin naturally. Lemon and lime juice , glycolic acid, and hydrogen peroxide can all produce mild bleaching action when applied directly to the skin. Chances are, you have one or more of these items sitting around in your pantry or medicine cabinet right now. [1]
    • Some holistic skincare experts also swear by the skin-lightening properties of undiluted essential oils, such as lavender oil.
    • Avoid mixing multiple lightening agents. Not only will this not make them more effective, it could cause an unsafe chemical reaction.
    • The actual effectiveness of topical skin lightening solutions is up for debate. If you decide to experiment with any of these substances, you’ll be doing so at your own risk. There’s a chance that they may not work permanently, or that they could result in scarring or similar damage. [2]
  2. 2 Try a tattoo remover cream if you’d rather use a commercial product. There are a number of creams, lotions, and gels on the market that claim to be able to rapidly fade subdermal ink. If you’re not interested in DIY solutions, consider giving one of these products a shot. Keep in mind, however, that there’s no hard evidence that they make much of a difference. [3]
    • Ask your tattoo artist if they have any recommendations for tattoo remover products that do what they’re advertised to do.
    • Tattoo removers often contain harsh chemicals, and could lead to irritation or even permanent scarring if applied regularly or incorrectly. [4]

    Advertisement

  3. 3 Rub your skin lightener of choice onto the tattoo until it’s fully absorbed. Saturate a washcloth, clean sponge, or folded strip of gauze with the liquid, then apply it to directly to your skin. You can do this by either blotting the area or covering the entire tattoo with the cloth, sponge, or gauze, if it’s small enough. What’s important is that the liquid makes contact with every part of the ink. [5]
    • For best results, allow your skin lightener to sit on your skin for 5-10 minutes after applying it.
    • You may need a helping hand if you’re attempting to fade a tattoo on your back or another hard-to-reach spot.

    Tip: Test your lightening agent on a small, out-of-the-way patch of skin before applying it over a larger area to make sure you won’t react negatively to it. [6]

  4. 4 Continue treating your tattoo 3-5 times a day until you see results. Get in the habit of applying your lightening agent at least twice throughout the course of the day—once in the morning and once in the evening. You’ll need to be persistent with your chosen home remedy if it’s to have any effect.
    • Stop using a particular skin lightener if it begins to cause redness, irritation, blistering, or peeling. [7]
    • Even with continual applications, there’s a chance that your tattoo may not lose its vibrancy.
  5. Advertisement

  1. 1 Mix up a basic homemade salt scrub. Combine ½ a cup (100 g) of coarse sea salt with 1 ⁄ 4 – 1 ⁄ 3 cup (59–79 mL) of olive, coconut, or almond oil in a small lidded container. Keep the container with the rest of your hygiene products, on your bedside table, or somewhere else where you’ll see it and remember to use it every day. [8]
    • If you like, you can also add a few drops of fragrant essential oils and some dried botanical elements to your salt scrub. This won’t affect its abrasive properties, but it will make it smell more pleasant. [9]
    • Salt scrubs are natural, easy to make, and highly effective as far as exfoliants go.
  2. 2 Pick up a gentle, vitamin-infused body scrub if you have sensitive skin. If you don’t like the idea of grinding a scratchy salt paste onto your extremities, you also have the option of buying a gentle commercial exfoliant designed specifically to nourish and protect skin. Along with abrasive elements, these products boast vitamins, minerals, and other key nutrients as main ingredients. [10]
    • Look for scrubs containing Vitamin C, which is especially good for maintaining soft, clear, glowing skin. [11]
    • Alternatively, you could try making your own nourishing body scrub using things like white or brown sugar, Epsom salts, shea butter, honey, coffee grounds, and aloe vera gel.
  3. 3 Apply a small amount of exfoliant directly to the tattoo. Scoop up a quarter-sized glob of your scrub with two fingers to start with and rub it onto the entire area. Smooth on additional exfoliant as needed to ensure that each part of the tattoo is covered with a thin layer.
    • You may need to use quite a bit of scrub if the tattoo you’re trying to erase is particularly large.
  4. 4 Massage the scrub into the tattoo vigorously using a pumice stone. Rather than trying to work the exfoliant in with your fingers, grab a pumice stone and rub it over the tattoo using small, circular motions. Apply light, steady pressure, and be careful not to scrub too hard. Do this for 30-60 seconds. [12]
    • Before you begin scrubbing, soak your pumice stone in a bowl of warm water. This will help it slide across your skin and cut down on unnecessary resistance. [13]
    • The pumice stone will cover a larger area and provide additional scouring power.

    Tip: The idea is to take off the outermost layer of skin a little at a time. Minor discomfort is normal, but if it hurts, try using a softer touch.

  5. 5 Rinse the area thoroughly with lukewarm water. Hold the exfoliated tattoo under a gentle stream to wash away the accumulated scrub and dead skin. Your skin will likely feel a little raw, so avoid using water that’s too hot, along with soaps or cleansers that might irritate or dry it out even more. [14]
    • It may be easier to hop in the shower if you can’t easily rinse your tattoo under the sink, or if you’re trying to fade multiple pieces at once.
    • If you like, you can apply little moisturizer after exfoliating to soothe and protect your skin. [15]
  6. 6 Repeat your exfoliation routine 2-3 times a day for about a month. In all likelihood, you’ll start to see a noticeable difference after a few weeks. Assuming you don’t, your only remaining option will be to talk to a dermatologist or plastic surgeon about a formal tattoo removal procedure. [16]
    • Discontinue treatment immediately if you experience severe or prolonged skin irritation.
  7. Advertisement

  1. 1 Talk to your dermatologist about a laser removal procedure. Laser removal is the only method that has been clinically proven to reduce the appearance of tattoos. During the procedure, specially-trained technicians use concentrated streams of light to break up the ink sitting deep below the surface of the skin. [17]
    • If you want guaranteed, permanent results, it’s highly recommended that you save up your money for a course of laser treatment.
    • While tattoo laser removal is extremely effective, it’s not quick or cheap—a single session can cost as much as $500, and in many cases it can take 2-6 sessions before you start to see a significant difference. [18]
    • Make sure you go to a licensed, reputable laser technician to get a tattoo removed. [19]
  2. 2 Receive a series of chemical peels to erase the tattoo gradually. This type of treatment is sometimes referred to as “chemical resurfacing. ” The way it works is that highly acidic chemicals are applied directly to the top layer of skin, causing it to die. After it sloughs off, the area is given time to heal, eventually leaving behind smooth, clear skin. [20]
    • Chemical peels were the most popular tattoo removal method before the introduction of light-based procedures. Even so, reports vary as to how well they work.
    • These treatments are not without risk. Possible complications include severe chemical burns and permanent scarring. [21]
  3. 3 Undergo surgery to have the tattoo partially removed. With traditional surgery, plastic surgeons actually cut out the layers of skin sitting on top of the embedded ink. The tattoo will no longer be as visible once new skin has grown in its place. [22]
    • Surgery can successfully fade tattoos to some degree, but in many cases surgeons aren’t safely able to cut deep enough to extract the majority of the ink. [23]
    • Like chemical peels it’s possible for a surgical operation to leave scars, bumps, discoloration, and other imperfections.
  4. Advertisement

Add New Question

  • Question How can I make my tattoo fade faster? Grant Lubbock is a Tattoo Artist and Co-Owner of Red Baron Ink, a tattoo salon based in New York City. Grant has over 10 years of tattooing experience and he specializes in neo-traditional, black/grey, and color tattoos. Red Baron Ink’s main goal is for each tattoo coming out of their studio to be one of a kind custom pieces that will look good throughout a lifetime. Tattoo Artist Expert Answer Skip out on applying moisturizing lotions to your tattoo since they can actually prevent tattoos from fading.

Ask a Question 200 characters left Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Submit Advertisement

  • You’re more likely to see a difference in tattoos in high-friction areas, such as your hands, feet, thighs, or the insides of your upper arms. [24]
  • Don’t worry if your tattoo doesn’t disappear altogether—partially-faded tattoos are easier and less expensive to have removed than ones that are still bold.

Advertisement

  • There’s no guarantee that any of the methods described here will be successful. If you want to get rid of a tattoo for good, your best bet is to consult a qualified skin care professional.
  • Ultraviolet light has been shown to help fade tattoos over time. However, it’s not recommended that you spend more time in the sun or tanning bed, as excessive exposure is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer.

Advertisement.

Can you be denied a job because of tattoos?

​The job candidate sitting in front of you has tattoos covering most of her left arm. Fair or not, you may conclude that the markings paint her as a renegade and, possibly, even as irresponsible or unreliable. Yet a different manager sitting across from the very same woman might see her tattoos as a sign that she’s progressive, creative and able to relate to younger customers.

That is how differently today’s employers view body art when they consider how well-equipped candidates are for the jobs they’re trying to fill. In fact, the research findings on how tattoos affect a job candidate’s hiring prospects differ widely.

On the one hand, a study published in August by professors at the University of Miami and the University of Western Australia found that tattoos make no difference in terms of getting hired. “This doesn’t mean that there are no individual instances of discrimination against tattooed people, but it does mean that, on balance, tattoos are not a liability in the labor market,” said Andrew Timming, associate professor of human resource management at the University of Western Australia Business School and a co-author of the study. “Obviously, all tattoos are not created equal. The genre and quality of a tattoo, as well as its placement, can impact employer decision-making. But the results suggest that, in aggregate, there is no employment discrimination against employees and job applicants with various forms of tattoos.

  • ” Yet a study released in July by professors at Colorado State and California State universities found the opposite—that there are hiring and wage biases against people with almost any type of tattoo or body piercing;

“Traditionally, tattoos were associated with marginalized groups such as gang members, prisoners and bikers,” said Chris Henle, associate professor at Colorado State University’s College of Business and one of the study authors. “Although tattoos are more mainstream and acceptable today, there are still lingering stereotypes associated with them.

  1. For example, tattooed individuals may be assumed to be impulsive, rebellious, untrustworthy and unreliable;
  2. In a hiring situation, we often have limited information about job applicants, which may prompt us to rely on these stereotypes;

” [SHRM members-only toolkit:  Managing Employee Dress and Appearance ] Tattoos by the Numbers About 3 in 10 Americans (29 percent) have at least one tattoo, according to a 2016 Harris Poll of 2,225 U. adults. Among those with any tattoos, 7 in 10 (69 percent) have two or more.

  1. Tattoos are especially prevalent among younger Americans, with nearly half of Millennials (47 percent) and over a third of those belonging to Generation X (36 percent) saying they have at least one, compared to 13 percent of Baby Boomers;

Millennials and members of Generation X (37 percent and 24 percent, respectively) are also far more likely than their elders (6 percent of Baby Boomers) to have multiple tattoos. The survey also found that:

  • Rural (35 percent) and urban (33 percent) Americans are more likely to have a tattoo than suburbanites (25 percent).
  • Those with kids in the household are much more likely than those without to be sporting at least one tattoo (43 percent compared to 21 percent).
  • Political persuasion doesn’t seem to factor into the decision to get a tattoo. There was little difference in the percentages of people with tattoos who identified as Republicans, Democrats or Independents (27 percent, 29 percent and 28 percent, respectively).

Yet the same poll found that 23 percent of people in the U. with tattoos regretted them. The top regrets from respondents were that they:

  • Were too young when they got the tattoo.
  • Now have a different personality, and the body art doesn’t fit their current lifestyle.
  • Are no longer with the romantic partner whose name is inked on their body.
  • Think the tattoo was poorly done or doesn’t look professional.

For those who regret their tattoo, getting rid of it can be expensive: Removing a 3-inch-by-5-inch tattoo costs a minimum of $5,000 (if it takes only eight sessions of laser surgery), the Wall Street Journal reported, and as much as $36,000. Across Professions, Opinions Vary on Visible Tattoos Bans on—and bias against—body art depend in large part on the industry. In the U. , most people would be comfortable seeing a person with visible tattoos serve in roles across a range of industries and professions, the Harris Poll found. An employer can establish a dress code prohibiting visible tattoos if the company believes they aren’t consistent with the organization’s branding, image, values or mission, according to  guidance from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). Many companies, including Starbucks, have relaxed or eliminated policies regarding tattoos. Others, including the Walt Disney Co. , continue to make employees cover visible tattoos. There are no current laws that prohibit employers from discriminating against people with visible tattoos..

Can you refuse to employ someone with tattoos?

Discrimination against tattoos in the workplace – There are currently no employment laws about specifically tattoos in the workplace. So if an employer believes the candidate has inappropriate tattoos for the workplace, they can choose to reject that candidate for that reason.

It’s understandable. If an employee will have to interact with clients or customers and has offensive tattoos in the workplace, it could damage business sales and reputation. Not only does it stand up in recruitment, but also in dismissals.

If there is a blanket ban on tattoos in policy and the employer followed the proper process, it would be fair to dismiss an employee for getting a tattoo. Any legislation would link tattoos in the workplace law against discrimination in the 2010 Equality Act.

How do you address a workplace tattoo?

Are workplace tattoos acceptable? – Tattoos are generally accepted in the workplace as long as they’re not offensive, unprofessional or distracting. In fact, nearly 3 out of 4 employers say they don’t mind hiring tattooed workers. However, visible tattoos are not appropriate for every profession and may not match your company’s vision.

  1. Even if your company gives the green light on body art, you may find that customers or coworkers discriminate against tattooed employees;
  2. Workers may avoid body art even if it’s not banned because they fear harassment or feel like they won’t fit in at their job;

That may explain why less than 10% of government employees have tattoos or piercings despite ink-friendly leniency in workplace policies.

How can I hide my tattoos without makeup?

How can I hide a tattoo from my parents?

Download Article Download Article While tattoos are becoming more and more commonplace–an estimated 1 in 5 people have at least one tattoo–but that doesn’t mean your mom, dad, or great grandma Joanne are down with you getting inked. Read on for suggestions on how to successfully keep your tattoo a secret from your parents, and what to do if they find out.

  1. 1 Pick something small. Now is not the time for that full sleeve of a koi fish. A smaller tattoo will be much easier to hide, as it will take less effort to cover it. If your parents surprise you and your tiny tattoo is in full view, you can even slap your hand over it so they won’t see.
    • A small tattoo shouldn’t be extremely detailed, as the fine lines will spread over time and blur the design. A simple and bold design will age better.
    • Think shapes like hearts and stars, arrows, crosses, musical notes, flowers, anchors, or paw prints. Or if you have major hometown pride, ask for a very simple, single-line representation of the skyline of your city.
    • A small tattoo might be easier to accept if they find out or you eventually show them. It might be the “ice breaker” that makes it easier for you to proceed with larger pieces.
  2. 2 Get the tattoo somewhere hidden or easy to cover. There are plenty of spots on your body your parents rarely see, and these are great places to hide a tattoo. Keep the seasons in mind when you are thinking about a good spot–if you run around in a bathing suit all summer your back-of-the-shoulder tattoo will be in full-view. [1]
    • Conspicuous or easily hidden spots include the inside of your lower lip, behind your ear, your ribs, your ankle, your foot, the inside of your wrist, your back.
    • Areas like the inside of the lip and bottom of the foot, and hands will fade much faster than other areas of the body, because those areas are constantly shedding cells and regenerating skin.

    Advertisement

  3. 3 Try white ink. If you have pale, un-freckled skin, you may want to consider a white tattoo. Geometric patterns are especially striking in white, and white ink will be far less noticeable than other colors.
    • It is imperative you get the tattoo where it will see as little sunlight as possible–even with a powerful SPF the sun can cause the white ink to disappear, just leaving some raised bumps and the memories of your rad tattoo. [2]
  4. 4 Go to a reputable shop. You may be tempted to go the stick-and-poke route, especially if you are under 18, but rethink that notion. Even if you sterilize the needles, you risk a serious infection, from skin infections to hepatitis to HIV. Plus, they rarely turn out very well. [3]
    • Bond with your friend not by giving each other stick-and-poke tattoos (and potentially a staph infection), but by going to the shop together and supporting each other as you get tattooed.
    • Check out the shop online and choose an artist you want to work with, whose style fits with your concept.
    • Go into the shop to make an appointment and speak with the artist. The shop should be clean, and smell like soap and cleaning supplies. If not, go somewhere else.
    • For a small piece, you may be able to get tattooed as a walk-in, but the best tattoo artists are usually booked up well in advance.
  5. Advertisement

  1. 1 Follow the artist’s care instructions exactly. If you get an infection, you’re going to have to tell your parents, because you may need medical treatment. Tattoo aftercare includes not picking at or scratching your skin, which could make your parents suspicious, anyway.
    • Don’t try to hide your new tattoo by re-wrapping it. The tattoo artist will cover the piece immediately after tattooing and instruct you when to take it off. Do not wrap it again, with a bandage, cloth, or anything else.
    • Tattoos cannot be submerged in water for at least two weeks afterwards, so if you are on the swim team, wait until the off-season.
    • Tattoos can “weep” for a few days, so be aware some fluid (clear or the color of your tattoo) may soak through your clothes. You should try to wear something loose anyway, so the tattoo can get air and heal.
  2. 2 Cover the tattoo with makeup. Once your tattoo is fully healed, you can disguise it with makeup. There is high-quality makeup made for this specific purpose, and it actually works. Many are strong enough to stay on all day, won’t rub off, and may even be waterproof. [4]
    • In a pinch you can use white face paint to cover a tattoo. Paint two layers over your tattoo (allowing the paint to dry in between layers), then cover with liquid foundation the color of your skin. A spritz of hairspray can help keep it in place. [5]
    • If your tattoo is very dark or has bring colors, purchase a primer as well. This will neutralize the colors of the tattoo so it won’t show through your coverup. [6]
  3. 3 Hide it with clothes and accessories. If you strategically placed your tattoo, it should be easy to hide with long sleeves, a thick watch band or bracelet, a bandaid or a ring. Just wearing your hair down can cover a tattoo behind your ear or on the back of your neck.
  4. 4 Be non-committal if the subject of tattoos comes up. Try not to be adamantly anti-tattoo. Say something like, “Actually, I think they can be really beautiful if they’re done well. ” You could even hint that you would consider getting one someday. If you say there’s absolutely no way you would ever get one in a million years and then your parents see the one you’ve been hiding, you’re going to come off as a bigger liar.
  5. Advertisement

  1. 1 Expect to be punished. You got caught, prepare to deal with the consequences. Whining, screaming, and making a scene isn’t going to help you prove to your parents that you are more than an impulsive child.
  2. 2 Apologize for concealing the tattoo from them. Acknowledging that you were wrong to lie shows maturity, and they may eventually realize you are old enough and mature enough to make decisions about what you do with your own body. This is another good reason to avoid the stick-and-poke–it makes a better impression if you made smart, safe choices when you got your piece and they don’t have to worry about your health, too.
    • Bringing up that it’s your body and you can do what you want with it might not go well in the heat of the moment. It is a valid point, but probably one to be made once things have cooled down and you can talk rationally about your decision.
  3. 3 Make up a compelling reason why you got the tattoo. It’s sort of a dirty trick, but if you say your tiny heart tattoo is to remind you of your dearly departed grandpa, your parents might soften a little. Or if you got a crucifix, tell them it’s tied to your faith and to remind you to be a good Christian, or your shamrock tattoo is to keep you grounded in your Irish roots.
    • This works best with broad, symbolic tattoos that you can easily connect to something significant.
  4. Advertisement

Add New Question

  • Question Would it be easy to hide a tattoo on the side of my foot? It’s one of the easiest places to hide a tattoo. When going outside, wear sneakers. You can also try wearing socks or using make-up concealer when wearing sandals.
  • Question How do I hide a tattoo when I have to go to the doctor for checkups? Try heavy foundation or powder that matches your skin tone. Don’t use bandaids to cover up the tattoo, though, because the doctor will think it’s an abrasion and may want to take the bandaid off to check it out. You probably don’t need to worry unless your parents are present for the examination, though. A doctor isn’t likely to say, “Hey, did you know your daughter has a tattoo?”
  • Question Can a tattoo be erased? Otterbarrone Community Answer You can get it removed either with a laser, or with a special cream. The cream is quite expensive, but the laser hurts more than getting the actual tattoo done.
  • Question If I ever get a tattoo on my back, shoulder, or arm, could I still wear tank tops during the healing process? Yes, as long as it isn’t too tight fitting. Make sure it’s cotton so your tattoo can breathe.
  • Question How can I hide my back tattoo while wearing a swimsuit? Wear a swimsuit that covers more of your back, such as a one piece or tankini.
  • Question Can I get a tattoo on my private parts, such as my butt or breast? Yes, you can. These places might be a bit more painful.
  • Question Can I get a tattoo as a child? No. You cannot legally get a tattoo until you are at least 16 or 18, depending on where you live.
  • Question Can I get in the shower 2-3 weeks after getting my tattoo? You can shower the day you get a tattoo. However, you should avoid very hot water, long showers, and submerging your tattoo for at least a month. (Make sure to clean the tattoo to avoid infection though. )
  • Question What place will allow me to get a tattoo if I’m only 14? Many tattoo places will let you get a tattoo. However, you will need a parent or guardian’s signature.
  • Question Would I be able to get someone to pretend to be my parents so that I’ll have permission? Eliza Weinberger Community Answer You could, but if they find out, there could, in theory, be impersonation or fraud charges. Do so at your own risk.

See more answers Ask a Question 200 characters left Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Submit Advertisement Thanks for submitting a tip for review!

  • Legally, you must be 18 to get a tattoo without your parent’s permission. (In most states)

Advertisement.

Can still see old tattoo under cover-up?

Covering old tattoos must account for each of these natural skin processes. – The new tattoo must not go too deep, or it will cause blowout. The new ink will undergo the same fading and microscopic migration as the old ink. What results is that most cover-ups look great on day one, but over time, the ink settles in such a way that the old tattoo will show through.

Traditional cover-ups must also take into account that whichever ink is darker will be the one that is visible. Much like coloring on paper with crayons, you can’t cover black or purple with white or yellow.

Both pigments will coexist in the same layer of skin, and the darker one will overpower the lighter one. Some artists attempt to overpower the old ink with multiple layers packed with light ink, but even this technique will usually fade over time and allow the old art to be visible.

How long do you need to cover-up tattoo?

You’ll need to keep your tattoo wrapped in cling film from one to three days. Depending on the size of your artwork this may be longer and your artist will let you know but a general rule of thumb is: Small line-work pieces – keep the cling film on for one to two days.