Why Does Your Blood Sugar Drop When Getting A Tattoo?

Why Does Your Blood Sugar Drop When Getting A Tattoo

How do nanotechnology tattoos work? – The ink is injected below the skin and is designed to fluoresce when it encounters glucose. A wristwatch-like device worn over the nano-tattoo would be used to detect and measure the amount of fluorescence, and thus monitor glucose concentrations in the blood.

Why do you need sugar when getting a tattoo?

Food and Activities You Should Avoid Before Getting a Tattoo – Unhealthy meals, such as those with a high fat and sugar content, should be avoided before, during, and after getting a tattoo since they can cause skin irritation, bleeding, and lots of scarring.

  • Caffeine, Energy Drinks, and Alcohol

Alcohol, coffee, and energy drinks can thin your blood. We recommend you skip the morning coffee or energy drinks on the day of your tattoo session or avoid drinking alcohol the night before your appointment. These drinks act as a stimulant that can make you nervous and uncomfortable. They can also raise your heart rate, increasing your blood flow and making the bleeding worse.

Also, there are lots of activities that may also slow down the healing process. To avoid the hassle, refer to this list of food and activities you should avoid when getting a tattoo. They might leave you feeling agitated and shaky because of the rapid surges and crashes of adrenaline.

Also, coming to your appointment under the influence of alcohol is unethical, and you should avoid drinking any alcoholic drinks at least a day or two before the tattoo session.

  • Ready-To-Drink Juices, Soda, and Processed Foods

Ready-made fruit juices and soda have extremely high sugar content. Processed foods, such as canned goods, instant noodles, smoked sausage, and fried meat, have lots of fats and salt content. Sugar, salt, and oil are proven to cause skin inflammations, prolonging the skin’s healing process.

  • Dairy Foods

Dairy products are proven to cause bloating, and they can make the appearance of your skin plumper. However, if the bloating has gone away, the outcome of your tattoo may be distorted and may not look the same way as it did while the skin was still plump.

  • Partying The Day Before The Appointment

We all know that most parties happen late at night and involve lots of alcoholic drinks – which are both big thumbs down when getting a tattoo. Instead, get a lot of quality sleep and drink lots of water before getting inked.

  • Getting Too Much Sun Exposure

Sun exposure can damage the skin, and high ultraviolet rays can cause extreme sensitivity and inflammation on the skin. If these occur, it may be difficult for the tattoo artist to pierce the needle on your skin. Also, your skin is no longer in its best condition to get inked. To avoid extreme damage from sun exposure, wear sunscreen and look for shade when staying outdoors for too long.

  • Wearing Tight Clothing

This isn’t food-related – but the client’s skin-tight clothes are the tattoo artists’ number one enemy. Not only does it cause hassle to remove the clothes, but the friction can also damage the outcome of the ink. You should wear loose clothes on the day of your appointment until the day that your tattoo finally heals. Why Does Your Blood Sugar Drop When Getting A Tattoo If you follow these tips before, during, and after getting a tattoo, your tattoo has the best chance of recovering faster! Also, we suggest getting your tattoo aftercare products right away to help you with your tattoo journey – from getting inked until the day that your skin finally recovers..

Why can’t a diabetic get a tattoo?

If you are living with diabetes and considering a tattoo, you must be certain that your blood sugars are in good control before getting inked. Chronically elevated blood sugars can increase the risk of a skin infection. This is especially true in type 1 diabetes.

Is sugar good after a tattoo?

So, Which Foods Should I Avoid After Getting a Tattoo? – Here are the foods you should completely avoid during the tattoo healing process. That is generally a period of 2 weeks to a month, sometimes even longer if your particular tattoo is naturally taking longer to heal.

  • Red and Processed Meat ( bacon, ham, pepperoni, sausage, salami, deli meats, meat jerkies, hot dogs, etc. ) – red and processed meat are known to promote inflammation. That is because both are high in saturated fat, which goes hand-in-hand with other health problems, like cancer or heart disease.
  • Sugary Foods and Drinks (cakes, milk chocolate, stuffed biscuits, candies, cereal bars, ice cream, sweetened coffee, drinks like Coca Cola and Pepsi, salad dressings, energy drinks, etc. ) – sugary foods and drinks are probably the worst enemies for the health of the body. Added sugar causes inflammation , promotes fat storage, and prevents the body from healing properly. That is something you should consume while you’re dealing with a healing tattoo, or consume at all.
  • Trans -Fat Foods (frozen pizza, baked goods, fried foods, including french fries, doughnuts, fried chicken, margarine, non-dairy coffee creamer, hamburgers, fried noodles, etc. ) – trans-fat foods are foods high in hydrogen and fat, which are added to improve texture, shelf life, and taste. Uch foods cause inflammation in the body and can lead to increased bad cholesterol levels.
  • Oil and Oil-Based Products (sunflower oil, peanut oil, canola oil, mayonnaise, etc. ) – oil and oil-based products contain omega-6 fatty acids, which are sometimes important for the body but can cause consistent inflammation and make the body have a pro-inflammatory response upon consumption. Instead of omega-6s, one should consume omega-3s (found in salmon, walnuts, and flaxseed).
  • Refined Carbs (bread, sugary cereals, pasta, white rice, french fries, crackers, and cookies, etc. ) – refined carbs don’t contribute to nutrition and generally contain added sugars. They promote inflammatory reactions in the body and prolong the healing process of any kind.
  • Alcoholic Beverages – alcohol should be avoided before and after getting a tattoo. It can dilute the blood and promote excessive bleeding during and after the tattooing process. Because of the excess blood, the tattoo will have a hard time drying and sealing, which can cause an inflammatory reaction and infection.

What is the best thing to eat before a tattoo?

Embrace the protein – If you’re wondering what to eat before you visit the tattoo studio, cook a meal that’s protein-rich with plenty of eggs, fish or red meat. Protein helps with recovery, so it’s a great way to prepare for the procedure ahead. If you want to snack during the tattooing process, consider packing some healthy foods such as nuts or fruit to fight any hunger pangs you might get while sitting in the chair. Why Does Your Blood Sugar Drop When Getting A Tattoo.

Should I eat carbs before tattoo?

tattoo advice tips for diabetic clients

Carbs are good, but not too many – Don’t overload on sugar before getting your tattoo, as it may make you more jittery than that second cup of coffee. But, Whitney Marie Donohue , artist at Rise Again Tattoo in Billings, MT, suggests “bringing little candies to keep your blood sugar up” during the session so that you don’t feel faint from the sight of needles, blood, or you know, from not eating at all.

Can I get tattooed if I’m diabetic?

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you may have a significantly increased risk of developing an infection, too. Tattooing is under strict hygiene rules from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because of this risk of infection.

Who should not get a tattoo?

Eczema – There are different types and degrees of eczema. Those that seldom have or have small flares are better candidates to be tattooed. While those with frequent, large and severe eczema should speak with their doctor before speaking to a tattoo a shop.

  1. People with eczema can have more sensitive skin, which could lead to allergic reactions to the pigments in tattoo ink;
  2. The process of getting a tattoo itself has the chance to cause skin irritations or flare ups – as the skin is punctured thousands of times and foreign particles (ink) is deposited below the skin to create a design;

If your new tattoo triggers a flare up, it runs the risks of not healing well and lengthy healing time – which also makes it more vulnerable to infection.

Can I have tattoo while diabetic?

Avoid certain parts of the body – If you have diabetes, you’re best to avoid getting tattoos and piercings on certain areas on your body where there’s a risk of poor circulation. Tattoos and piercings in these places usually take longer to heal, which can cause infections.

  • These include your bum, shins, ankles and feet;
  • You should also avoid areas where you usually inject insulin , like your arms, stomach and thighs, so you can clearly see if any infections are developing on these sites;
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If you use, or are considering using  flash glucose monitoring , these should not be worn over areas with tattoos, as this could impact your results. Use a licensed tattooist or piercer. Tattoo and piercing studios in the UK all need a licence from their local authority.

  1. This means that they’re trained and follow correct, safe and hygienic procedures;
  2. Make sure the studio you choose has this licence;
  3. You could also ask around for recommendations of a good studio to use or look at online reviews;

Picking a safe and hygienic studio is really important. Unclean equipment can also cause infections and other illnesses.

What shouldn’t you eat after getting a tattoo?

Pork and processed meats such as fresh and smoked sausage, ham, bacon, mortadella and salami; Sweets, stuffed biscuits, cakes, ready-made cakes, chocolates, cereal bars; Instant noodles, stock cubes, ready to eat frozen meals, ice cream; Alcoholic beverages.

Why do people pass out during tattoos?

If you have no underlying health conditions, fainting during a piercing or tattoo is usually caused by something called Vasovagal or ‘reflex’ Syncope. This is a reflex reaction to trauma, pain, or any other distress, and is responsible for over 50% of fainting episodes!.

How do you prevent fainting when getting a tattoo?

My “virgin husband” finally determined he was ready to venture out and get his first tattoo. Having no time in our normal lives we decided the best time to get one would be on the last day of our Hawaii vacation on the big island of Hawaii. We chose Rockwood’s Big Island Tattoo.

Rockwood, who has been tattooing for 40 years, designed a gecko tribal armband for my husband and added some green pigment to the traditional tribal black. It’s fabulous. While my husband was getting his tattoo, I talked to Rockwood about the insurance issues we have had with fainting.

He advised situations where there could be problems: *People who drink alcohol in any amount prior to getting tattooed are at a higher risk of passing out. *People who have not eaten within a few hours of being tattooed are also at a higher risk. *Anyone overly excited about getting a tattoo is a higher risk.

  • Rockwood says he would do the following: *Keep the temperature of the shop low;
  • Tattooing will naturally increase the client’s body heat, so after a few minutes the shop will seem plenty warm;
  • Thus he likes to keep the temperature under 70 degrees to limit the possibility of a client fainting;

*If you think someone is heading in the direction of fainting (or they tell you they feel funny) get a wet paper towel to put on the back of the neck and SMALL amounts of water if they want any. If they get clammy and sweaty during the tattoo, there is an increased risk they could faint.

*If a client does pass out during the procedure the best thing to do is stop tattooing, hold onto the client as to not let them fall to the floor and talk to then constantly during their time out. Reassure them they are OK, as people tend to go to strange places in the mind.

Tell them where they are and remind them they are getting tattooed. This way they are less likely to wake up swinging, as they can be confused as to what is happening to them when they wake up. If there is an obvious physical issue as above or if the tattoo work goes over 1-2 hours, tell the client they must stay for 15 minutes after the tattoo to get their body processes back to where they normally are.

Tell them they are required to stay this amount of time in these instances. If for some reason they don’t, the shop has gone on record with promoting this requirement. If there is a friend or significant other with the newly tattooed person, it might be a good idea to tell them to be on the alert for the next few hours for light headedness especially if the tattoo took quite a bit of time or covered a lot of the body.

I know this for a fact. My brave husband patiently handled the 2 hour tattoo, without even a flinch and drove one hour back to our hotel. Three hours later he was in the bathroom combing his hair when I happened to walk and suggested we replace his bandage.

He turned the wrong way and started to faint. I reached out my arm to cushion his fall on the marble sink, luckily for him. People getting their first tattoo are often excited and stimulated by the experience and have an out-of-the-ordinary adrenaline rush.

By being aware of this, all parties can help the newly tattooed person avoid any possible injury. According to Rockwood, “Alan’s passing out afterwards is generally associated with the brain realizing the torture is over and basically shutting down to reboot, as it were.

How Much Should U tip a tattoo artist?

How Much to Tip Tattoo Artists – Unfortunately, there’s no hard and fast rule governing how much to tip tattoo artists. As with tipping waitstaff, 20-25% percent is a good standard. An easy way to include tipping in your budget is to add it in when getting the estimated costs for having your work done.

So, if your tattoo is expected to cost $200, with a 20-percent tip, that’s $240. That said, you can tip more or less, depending on several factors. For one thing, your willingness to tip will depend on how pleased you are with their work.

If you don’t like the work, it makes sense that you would want to tip less. That’s up to you. But keep in mind that a tattoo is a piece of art you wear on your body for personal expression. The tattoo artist makes your vision a reality on your skin. Choosing the right tattoo artist is as important as choosing the right tattoo.

Do your research, first. Don’t be afraid to ask people with great ink where they got it done. Chances are they’d love to tell you about their tattoo artist and the experiences they had with them. Another reason you might tip less or choose not to tip at all is because of a bad experience.

But, like any service-based industry, it’s not just the artist’s attitude that’s a big deal. You want to be treated with dignity and respect, but so does your tattoo artist. Tipping is a part of that, but so is showing up on time and being ready for your appointment.

In most instances, tipping is appropriate and encouraged. While you can tip less than 15%, try to avoid it. Good work should be recognized, and being broke is no excuse not to tip. If you don’t have the money to tip your artist, rethink getting tattooed until you can.

Or, ask your artist if they’d be interested in being tipped in goods or services if you run your own business and can float a sweet freebie their way in lieu of cash. Tipping in cash is fine. That way your tattoo artist gets the entirety of the tip and avoids any service fees or taxes.

  • If adding your tip to a credit or debit transaction, add a bit more to cover those fees;
  • The best time to tip is after your appointment when you’re paying for your services;
  • If your tattoo artist isn’t the person checking you out, just hit them up afterward with a thank you and, “This is for you;

” They’ll appreciate it. Remember, you’re tipping them based on their professionalism and the quality of their work, so there’s nothing wrong with waiting to make sure you’re pleased with the experience before you tip. You also don’t need to let your tattooer know you’re tipping, but it’s not a bad idea.

That way they know you didn’t accidentally overpay them or think they owe you change. In some rare instances, a tattooer might not accept tips if they’re the owner of the shop, but that’s very unlikely to be the case.

There’s no reason to ask your artist about tipping if you plan on tipping them with cash. And, most credit card interfaces offer prompts for adding tips as part of the check-out process, making it even easier. Gratuities are part of the tattoo experience so don’t feel awkward or uncomfortable about them. Why Does Your Blood Sugar Drop When Getting A Tattoo.

What are the most painful areas to get a tattoo?

Where is the least painful place to get a tattoo?

Least painful to tattoo – The least painful places to get a tattoo are areas of your body with fewer nerve endings. Think outer shoulder, calf, buttocks, and outer arm. While people generally focus on the location on the body, Stanley Kovak , a cosmetic physician, theorizes that pain is more about size.

Is it OK to get a tattoo on an empty stomach?

Make sure to eat something a few hours before you come in. Getting tattooed on an empty stomach may cause you to feel faint, nauseated, or dizzy. Allow plenty of time for your visit. Your tattoo session will be most enjoyable if you have time to appreciate it.

Can you get a tattoo with low blood sugar?

Blue circle diabetes tattoo – If you found this guide to diabetes and tattoos useful , please sign up for our newsletter (and get a sign-up bonus) in the form below. We send out a weekly newsletter with the latest posts and recipes from Diabetes Strong. –>.

How long does tattoo flu last?

Although it can sometimes take around 8 weeks for the wound to fully heal, these symptoms should not last more than 2 weeks. Infection may be present if a person experiences: swelling that does not go down after 48 hours.

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Can your body go into shock from a tattoo?

Tattoo Frequently Asked Questions Does It Hurt? This is number one in our Frequently Asked Questions simply because it is surprisingly just that. The simple answer is, yes it does. However, not as much as some people might like you to believe, as after a short period of time your body’s natural pain-killers (endorphins), kick in and make things much more manageable.

How long these endorphins last usually defines your natural ‘limit’ as to how long a tattoo session you can handle (usually between 2-3 hours), after this time you will tend to become very uncomfortable.

The pain of a tattoo is often likened to a mild burning sensation or a cat scratch. However, the real factor as to how much a tattoo hurts is really down to where you intend to get it. Any area directly over bone will be particularly sensitive; this includes ribs, feet, hands, head, and pelvis to name a few.

Add to this the number of nerve endings in an area and this defines the most painful places. If you are looking for a less painful spot, then you should consider a less sensitive area protected by a large muscle; such as the fore-arm, upper-arm, shoulder, calf and thigh.

That being said, everyone’s pain threshold varies, so there are no hard and fast answers to this question. How long does a tattoo take? Tattooing is not a quick process, nor should it be rushed as you will be living with the results permanently. An averagely complex piece of work about the size of the back of your hand, usually takes about two hours to complete.

  1. Larger or more complex pieces can take tens of hours, and will require several sittings to complete;
  2. Usually appointments are made in multiples of hours, but some smaller pieces may only require a thirty minute appointment;

A full sleeve (done by any decent artist), could take anything from ten to fifty hours work to complete depending on complexity. How much does it cost? When it comes to tattooing, you get what you pay for. Do not expect a good artist to come cheap, and if that’s the way you go, you could end up spending a great deal more further down the line, when you have to pay for a large cover-up or laser tattoo removal.

  1. Save your money until you can afford what you really want! Don’t settle, just because you are impatient to get some ink, this decision will be with you for a long time;
  2. Most of the laser removal we do here at SECRET INK, is for just that reason, impulse tattoos! At SECRET INK we are happy to do a payment plan with you where you can pay for the tattoo you really want gradually;

Can I use numbing cream or pain killers? This is a less frequently asked question than you might expect. You can use numbing cream, but very few tattoo studios will recommend it for several reasons. Firstly, it needs to be applied several hours before you sit for your tattoo and can only last for around thirty to forty-five minutes.

Tattooing being an art-form and therefore not an exact science, means that sometimes there could be a period of waiting past your appointment time, while the tattooist finishes off a piece of work that took longer than expected.

This makes it very difficult to time the application of the cream. Secondly, even if you manage to time its application correctly, the potential short working period of the cream makes it a very limiting to anything but the simplest and smallest of tattoos.

  • Lastly, if your tattoo is not finished before the cream wears off, then the pain will come back with a vengeance! Your body has been fooled and will not be producing those handy pain-killing endorphins, so will be hit with the force of the returning pain with no protection;

From the tattooist’s perspective, the creams can cause the skin to become a little puffy in some customers. This means that the tattooist needs to work harder to get the ink into the skin, which can cause additional trauma. This will obviously have some repercussions during the healing process and can create an undesirable amount of scabbing during that time.

  1. Some tablet pain killers can also cause a problem;
  2. Aspirin is the biggest problem as it thins the blood and reduces clotting, this will cause excessive bleeding during your tattoo, which will affect the quality of the finished tattoo;

Aspirin will also extend the healing time that your tattoo needs so it is best avoided. Paracetamol will have little effect (positive or negative), other than a placebo. Ibuprofen based painkillers can give minor pain relief during the process, by reducing localised swelling, and will not hinder the tattoo in any way.

Can tattoo’s be removed? They can, completely and without scaring. There are several options available to you if you have ink that you want rid of. The first, and by far most common way is the cover-up. This involves working with your tattoo artist to come up with a design that will go over and ‘cover-up’ the old one.

There are a few misconceptions regarding cover-ups, it is not as easy as just doing another tattoo over the top. The new tattoo will sit in the same layer of skin (the dermis), as the old one, so the cover-up needs to be darker than the existing tattoo in order to over-power it.

  1. This makes very old or faded tattoos easier to cover up than new bright ones;
  2. The black panther was a big cover-up favourite with the ‘Old School’ tattooists, for obvious reasons;
  3. This also means that the new tattoo generally has to be a great deal bigger than the one to be covered up, so that the old design can be lost in the new one;

Obviously this very much depends on the tattoo to be covered and the skill of your artist. The second option available to you is laser removal. This can be very effective, again depending on age and colour of the tattoo, but can also be very time consuming.

Have a look at the Laser Removal Frequently Asked Questions ( Laser FAQs ), on our website if you are interested in more information on removal. The third option available is a combination of both of the above.

The laser removal can be used to reduce the density of the offending tattoo, so that a much more desirable (and often smaller), tattoo can be used to cover up the old design. This takes much less laser treatment than removal, and gives much better cover-up results on the new tattoo.

How do I decide on a design? Traditionally, you would have chosen your tattoo design from the designs on the wall of your tattoo studio, or from their stock books of pre-drawn designs. These designs are referred to as ‘Flash Art’.

This work was rarely designed by the tattooist, but instead bought in from ‘Flash Art’ suppliers. Thankfully today things are different. While there are still tattooists who rely heavily on Flash (often because they have limited artistic ability of their own), there is an increasing number of tattooists who will design custom work to your specifications.

  1. This obviously requires a higher degree of artistic skill, so you should expect to pay slightly more for bespoke work than for Flash, but you will be guaranteed an original piece… not the same tattoo that five other people are walking round town with! In addition to this, your artist will be able to work with you to generate a tattoo that is personal, has more meaning and is less likely to go out of favour with you in a few years;

This all adds up to better value in the long run. At Secret ink Tattoo, we don’t carry ‘Flash’ art. All our tattoos are generated bespoke for the customer to ensure you only get the best in custom designs, unique to you. Because of this, we suggest that you begin with an initial free consultation with your artist to discuss your design.

If you can bring your tattoo artist any reference material that you think is relevant, it will help both of you understand each other much easier. You don’t have to have exact images, even if your examples simply have the same ‘feel’ as what you are trying to convey it will help your tattoo artist understand your needs.

Your tattoo artist should also give you lots of good advice regarding the limitations of the art (don’t forget, we are talking needles, ink and skin here, not pen and paper). They should advise you as to placement, and how the tattoo is likely to be viewed, for example; a small piece that would work well on the wrist, might not work as well placed on the thigh.

  1. They should also discuss how well your tattoo will stand the test of time;
  2. You can generate some amazingly complex and delicate tattoos, but tattoo ink spreads and thins under the skin over time, so your dainty tattoo might look great on the day, but may look fuzzy and unrecognisable after just a couple of years;

A slightly bolder design could look great for ten years or more. The choice is always the customer’s, but it should always be an informed choice. Once you have had the initial conversation with your tattoo artist, you will usually then want to book in for some time at the studio.

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Your tattoo artist will usually have a good idea at this point as to how long your tattoo is going to take, and will be able to advise you on cost. Booking your appointment usually requires a deposit (£50 unless your tattoo comes in under that price), which is to discourage time wasters and to offset against the artwork the tattoo artist will produce for you, should you not turn up.

When you do turn up however, your design work will be free and your deposit will be then offset against the price of your tattoo. A few days before your appointment, we will usually email your design to you (unless other arrangements have been made), so that you can approve the design or make any changes that need to be made to the design.

We are not precious over designs, we understand that it is your tattoo, so don’t worry about offending our artists if you don’t like your design, it will be redrawn as many times as needed to make sure it is perfect for you.

How do I decide on a studio? Visit studios, talk to the tattoo artist, get a general feel for them. Getting a tattoo is a very personal experience, you should have a rapport with your tattooist, and feel comfortable in their studio. How is their customer service? Many tattooists will treat customers with contempt, as if it’s a burden to them to work with you, especially if it is your first tattoo… just walk away, there are plenty of tattooists who will treat you with respect.

If you get an unhelpful response, or are told to ‘pick something from the Flash’, when you ask for help, again maybe the best course of action is to find another studio. Is the studio clean and well presented? If a tattoo artist can’t keep their house in order, what other corners might they be cutting? You could potentially be putting your own health and wellbeing at risk.

Ask yourself; if this was a dental surgery and not a tattoo studio, would I let them touch my teeth? Potentially there are a great deal of similarities between the two regarding the possibility of cross contamination of instruments and equipment, and the transmitting of blood-borne pathogens.

  1. The regulations in the tattooing industry are minimal at best, so it is very much up to the individual studio to police themselves past the very basic health and safety requirements;
  2. Because of this the cleanliness of the studio, will very much reflect their attitude towards their customer and their customer’s wellbeing;

Should I have a drink before my tattoo to steady my nerves? No. This is not advisable for several very real reasons, other than the obvious difficulties of tattooing a drunk person, and the fact that any good tattooist will refuse to tattoo you if you have.

  1. The main reason is that alcohol thins your blood considerably;
  2. In turn this causes excessive bleeding while you are having the tattoo, which not only makes it difficult for the tattoo artist, but will have the effect of ‘washing out’ ink as it is being put in;

This makes the process much longer, and can produce poor results. Alcohol can have an effect for several days, so it is also not a good idea to have a tattoo after a night drinking, even if you have not consumed anything on the day. What should I do on the day of my tattoo? There are several things you can do to make your experience easier and more enjoyable.

  1. Firstly, try and make sure you have had something to eat and drink about an hour before your tattoo;
  2. During the tattoo, your body behaves in a way very similar to going into shock, as it generates endorphins to deal with the attack on the skin;

This can cause a drop in blood sugar, resulting in light-headedness, and sometimes nausea or fainting. Having a meal and consuming natural sugars, such as orange juice can help to prevent this. If you feel faint during your tattoo, let your artist know immediately, and they will help you through it.

  • Don’t be ashamed of telling them, if you have chosen your studio wisely, they will be totally sympathetic to your needs and help you through the experience with dignity;
  • Often a tattoo studio will offer you hard boiled sweets or a lolly to help keep your sugar up during the tattoo;

Secondly, think about what you are going to wear. You know where you are likely to get your tattoo, so make sure you dress so that you can expose this general area while at the same time maintaining your dignity. Usually the studio area can be covered (door closed or a screen put in place), if you are feeling particularly vulnerable.

  1. Have these conversations with your studio and they should be able to tell you what they can put in place to make you feel comfortable;
  2. Don’t wear your Sunday best;
  3. While tattoo ink will generally not stain clothes, and your artist will do everything they can to keep your clothing clean, there is always the possibility of getting ink on your clothes so dark clothing is favourable;

Tattoo ink is very concentrated, and will go a very long way, so it’s always best to bear this in mind when choosing the day’s wardrobe. If you do need to remove tattoo ink from your clothing, you will need to do so on a very hot wash. Thirdly, shave the area if possible.

If you know where you are having your tattoo, shave the area (and surrounding area), the morning prior to getting inked. Even if you don’t think it needs doing, shave it anyway, as even the smallest, downiest hairs can have a detrimental effect on the tattoo process, but don’t worry, your tattoo artist will still shave you if you haven’t.

This will save time applying the stencil and mean that more of the time you are paying for is going towards your tattoo rather than preparing the area. It is a small thing, but your tattoo artist will really appreciate that you have taken the time to consider this.

However at SECRET INK this is not a huge concern as we do not feel there should be any financial pressure on the customer during preparation, so will only charge for the time you are actually being tattooed.

Other things you may want to consider bringing might include an MP3 player, or other distraction like a book or smart phone etc. Some people like to chat to the tattooist, others like stony silence, others prefer a distraction like the things mentioned above.

Can I catch anything from getting a tattoo? Yes you can, but it is very unlikely. If you have followed the advice above and chosen your tattoo studio wisely, then the chances of catching anything are similar to a visit to the dentist.

Everything will be either sterilised to medical standards or be disposable single use. Again, a reputable tattooist will be certified in infection control and have no issues discussing their procedures with you. If they do, don’t think twice, just walk away.

  1. If correct infection control procedures are not followed, there is the potential of transmitting blood-borne pathogens from one customer to the next, or from the tattooist to the customer;
  2. This could potentially include HIV or Hepatitis;

However, before you become unduly worried, the vast majority of tattooists work safely, and the chances of you contracting anything like this from having your tattoo are extremely slight. Again, if you choose your studio wisely, this won’t even be a consideration.

  • The other thing you might hear people say is; “I got my tattoo/piercing form Joe Blogs Tattoo, and it got infected, I must have got the infection from there!” This is absolute rubbish! Apart from blood-borne infection (viral), as mentioned above, you won’t catch an infection like they are discussing from a studio, as what they are talking about is an infection caused by bacteria;

You don’t catch bacteria, it builds up over time. That only means one thing, poor aftercare. That applies for tattooing, piercing and laser removal, the only way bacteria will infect you is if you’re not keeping the wound (yes it is a wound), clean. For further information on how to look after your new tattoo, piercing or laser treatment , check out the relevant sections on our website.

  1. How safe is Tattoo Ink? It depends where it comes from;
  2. There are many inks on the market today that are readily available;
  3. High quality tattoo ink, Ink has been tried and tested over generations without ill effects;

Nowadays, the manufacture of inks is regulated to meet certain health and safety standards, but only in some countries (EU and USA). sale of tattoo inks on eBay, has unfortunately opened the market up to cheap Chinese inks, and counterfeit copies of well known and respected brands.

These Chinese inks can be dangerous. A report was recently released in which some of these inks had been analysed and shown to contain both banned and toxic substances. With this in mind, it is no longer good enough that your tattoo artist uses trusted brands, they must also source their inks directly from the manufacturer, or manufacturer’s approved outlet, to ensure the integrity of their product.

If you have any other questions that we haven’t answered here, please feel free to contact us..