Where To Get My First Tattoo?

Where To Get My First Tattoo
Places to Avoid for Your First Tattoo – Generally speaking, the biggest concern for someone getting their first tattoo is the level of pain they expect. Obviously, getting a tattoo isn’t like a unicorn licking rainbows on your skin, the process can be painful and lengthy, depending on the location and the length of time that you sit in the chair. Here are some of the areas that you should avoid if you’re worried about pain:

  • The rib cage is extremely sensitive
  • Fingers have little cushioning between the skin and the bone, so are quite painful during the tattoo process
  • Elbows also lack enough ‘meat’ to create a cushion, so you’ll feel the tattoo needles right down to the bone
  • The ankle is not an ideal place for your first tattoo, with the skin sitting so close to the bone, as well as all the weird ways you have to keep bending your foot in order to get the perfect tattoo

Choosing an area for your first tattoo though, shouldn’t be made on the level of pain that you wish to avoid, but rather, on the perfect placement for the design you’ve chosen. You’ll really want to chat to your tattoo artist about the designs that you have in mind, and where he thinks the tattoo will be showcased best.

Where is the least painful place to get your first tattoo?

Outer shoulders The outer part of your shoulders has thick skin with few nerve endings, making it one of the least painful places to get tattooed.

How much should I spend on my first tattoo?

Table of Contents –

  1. Average Tattoo Cost
  2. Tattoo Prices
    • By Size
    • Per Hour
    • Per Letter
  3. Tattoo Cost Calculator
    • Cost Estimator
    • Half & Full Sleeve
    • Eyebrow & Eyeliner
    • Wrist & Ankle
    • Lip / Inner Lip
    • Forearm & Tricep
    • Finger & Ring
    • Full Back
    • Chest, Sternum, & Side
    • Hip & Leg
    • More.
  4. Tattoo Cost Factors
  5. Tattoo Cost Examples
    • Pricing Guide
    • Word or Name
    • Portrait
    • Tribal
    • 3D
    • More.
  6. Tattoo Designs By Famous Artists
  7. Frequently Asked Questions
  8. Tips Before Hiring A Tattoo Artist
  9. Tattoo Shops Near Me
You might be interested:  33 Pretty Cherry Blossom Tattoos and Designs

Should you get a small tattoo first?

A few more tips for choosing the right tattoo design – So, you thought choosing a tattoo design was simple? Well, think again, although choosing a tattoo design isn’t rocket science. But there’s more to it than one would think, especially if you’re new to tattoos. Here are some other things to consider when picking the right design for you:

  • Small, highly-detailed tattoos generally don’t age well. Your tattoos naturally fade as your body ages. Fine lines become thicker. Darker colors fade into less dominant colors. Crisp edges grow softer. Those changes look even more drastic on smaller tattoos that have a lot of detail, as well as on tattoos that are photorealistic.
  • During the design-choosing process imagine your tattoo being extra large. Take a smaller element of a larger design and make that your tattoo.
  • The simpler your tattoo design – especially your first design – the better. That’s especially true for smaller tattoos, but it’s a good rule for tattoos of any size. Don’t add too many things to the design, but keep it to one main subject, one secondary subject, and one background element.
  • Choose a design that includes your favorite colors, favorite images, and a style that you like.
  • Think it through and then think it through some more. Give yourself a few months to think about your tattoo design. If you still haven’t soured on the idea, then there’s no reason you shouldn’t get it.
  • On the other hand, spontaneity is sometimes a good thing (especially if you’re in a rational frame of mind) when deciding suddenly to get a tattoo.

You should never make a rash decision about something that’s as permanent as a tattoo, even if it’s a decision you make spontaneously. But many people who made a spur-of-the-moment decision to get a tattoo end up having regrets about it. Choose a design that you won’t outgrow, such as political statements or pop culture references that will seem incredibly dated a few years from now. In today’s fast-moving world with its rapidly-changing tastes, some things seem outdated in even in a year.

Who should not get a tattoo?

Eczema – There are different types and degrees of eczema. Those that seldom have or have small flares are better candidates to be tattooed. While those with frequent, large and severe eczema should speak with their doctor before speaking to a tattoo a shop.

People with eczema can have more sensitive skin, which could lead to allergic reactions to the pigments in tattoo ink. The process of getting a tattoo itself has the chance to cause skin irritations or flare ups – as the skin is punctured thousands of times and foreign particles (ink) is deposited below the skin to create a design.

If your new tattoo triggers a flare up, it runs the risks of not healing well and lengthy healing time – which also makes it more vulnerable to infection.

You might be interested:  29 Magnificent Koi Sleeve Tattoos Designs

How do I prepare for tattoo pain?

How do you prepare for a tattoo?

Do you tip a tattoo artist?

How Much to Tip – If you decide to tip, the next step is to calculate exactly how much to add to the final tattoo price. The general consensus in the tattoo community is that 20 percent is the typical amount to tip — just like at a restaurant or a hair salon.

  1. However, consider this number a baseline, as some tattoos require more or less work than others;
  2. Just like there is no one tattoo experience or price, there’s no one-size-fits-all tipping option;
  3. “The more you spend on the tattoo, the more you should tip, as they are putting more work into the piece,” says Fiore;

Weed, however, notes that there is one thing that every tattoo experience needs to have to warrant a tip: It needs to be great. Your artist is putting time into the behind-the-scenes of your tattoo, but it’s also their responsibility to ensure you’re comfortable and having a good time while it’s happening.

What does getting a tattoo feel like?

– It’s no surprise that getting a tattoo often hurts. Getting one involves receiving many microwounds over a concentrated area of your body. But there are different sensations of pain. Just think of the difference in sensation between a bruise and a cut. Tattoo pain will usually be most severe during the first few minutes, after which your body should begin to adjust.

If your tattoo is particularly large or detailed, the pain can become intense again toward the end, when pain- and stress-dulling hormones called endorphins may begin to fade. Some people describe the pain as a pricking sensation.

Others say it feels like bee stings or being scratched. A thin needle is piercing your skin, so you can expect at least a little pricking sensation. As the needle moves closer to the bone, it may feel like a painful vibration.

Can you shower after a tattoo?

The bottom line. Showering with a new tattoo isn’t only fine; it’s necessary for the sake of good hygiene. As long as you follow the aftercare instructions your tattoo artist gives you, and you’re careful not to rub or soak your tattoo, showering shouldn’t interfere with the healing process of your new ink.

What should I bring to a tattoo appointment?

What should you not do after a tattoo?

Everything You Need to Know Before Your First Tattoo | Dos and Don’ts

When’s the best time to get a tattoo?

Why Fall is the Ideal Time of the Year to Get a Tattoo – There are many reasons why the fall and winter months make for the best tattoo season. First, both you and the artist are likely to be more comfortable during these seasons. Studios will be more temperate and both of you will sweat less.

  1. During the winter, you will sweat less and your skin will be less exposed to the elements;
  2. This will make it possible for the tattoo to heal more quickly, reduce chances of infection and ensure the entire healing process is seamless;
You might be interested:  How Often Should You Apply Aquaphor To A New Tattoo?

If you get tattooed in the winter, the artwork will be completely healed by the time summer sets in. This will be the best time to show of the piece of art. Compared to the hotter summer months, winter will generally be a slow season for most people. Since fewer people will not get tattoos during this season, the studios will not be as busy. Where To Get My First Tattoo.

What should I eat before a tattoo?

Embrace the protein – If you’re wondering what to eat before you visit the tattoo studio, cook a meal that’s protein-rich with plenty of eggs, fish or red meat. Protein helps with recovery, so it’s a great way to prepare for the procedure ahead. If you want to snack during the tattooing process, consider packing some healthy foods such as nuts or fruit to fight any hunger pangs you might get while sitting in the chair. Where To Get My First Tattoo.

Does tattoo ink go into blood?

Research Continues into the Safety of Tattoos  – As far as tattoo ink getting into your veins goes, the answer is that, yes, it happens. The process involves ink being injected into your dermis, which happens to contain many blood vessels. A skilled tattoo artist can keep the amount of ink getting into your veins to a minimum by injecting the ink at the correct depth.

Where is the most painless place to get a tattoo?

What is the least painful place for a woman to get a tattoo?

Areas such as the stomach, outer shoulders, outer bicep, and outer thighs cause the least pain. For women, your back also feels the least painful.

What is a good first tattoo?

While upper arms, forearms, thighs, and calves are all great locations, Brodsky says elbow and knee tattooing can be ‘kind of spicy, but it’s still doable. ‘ Tattoos on the torso hurt worse, she explains, because the skin is softer and lighter.

Where do tattoos hurt most?

  • Tattoo pain will vary depending on your age, sex, and pain threshold.
  • The most painful spots to get a tattoo are your ribs, spine, fingers, and shins.
  • The least painful spots to get a tattoo are your forearms, stomach, and outer thighs.

Getting a tattoo involves an ink-filled needle repeatedly puncturing your skin. Consequently, it’s not unusual to wonder how much pain you should expect when considering a tattoo. As it turns out, pain is a highly subjective experience , and how much discomfort you feel while getting tattoed can depend on a couple of factors including your biological sex, pain tolerance, and most importantly – the area of your body getting tattooed.