What To Expect When Getting A Tattoo?

What To Expect When Getting A Tattoo
– If you’ve made it this far into our guide, it’s safe to say that you have all your bases covered. To wrap things up, here’s how your interaction with your artist and getting your tattoo done will likely unfold:

  1. Reach out to the artist or shop to talk about rates and set up a consultation.
  2. Meet the artist to talk about your design and expectations.
  3. Agree upon the final design with the artist and confirm the rate. If revisions are needed, this may involve setting up a follow-up appointment to look over the final design before locking in your tattoo date.
  4. Aspirin (Bayer) and ibuprofen (Advil) are off limits in the 24 hours leading up to your appointment, as they can thin your blood. This applies to the consumption of alcohol as well. You may be able to take acetaminophen (Tylenol), but confirm this with your artist beforehand.
  5. Plan to wear something that will keep the area to be tattooed exposed. If you can’t do this, wear something you can easily slip in and out of.
  6. Show up to your appointment 10 minutes early. Don’t forget to bring cash for tips!
  7. Fill out any paperwork and, if needed, finalize any details of your design.
  8. Your artist will take you to their station. You may need to roll up or remove any clothing that may be in the way of your tattoo placement.
  9. Your artist will disinfect the area and use a disposable razor to remove any hair.
  10. Then your artist will place the tattoo stencil onto your skin. Move this around as much as you like until you’re happy with the placement!
  11. Once the placement is perfect, your artist will tattoo the outline of your design before filling in any colors or gradients.
  12. After your artist is finished, they’ll clean the tattooed area, wrap it up, and tell you how to take care of it.
  13. Don’t forget to leave a tip for your artist when you pay! It’s standard to tip at least 20 percent, but if you had an awesome experience and are able to tip more, go ahead.

If you have any lingering questions, ask before you leave the shop. One of the best times to get them answered is when your artist is wrapping your skin. Since you’re here, screenshot or print out this handy list of questions for your consultation before you commit to an artist.

How do you prepare for a tattoo?

What should I know before getting a tattoo?

What does getting tattooed feel like?

– It’s no surprise that getting a tattoo often hurts. Getting one involves receiving many microwounds over a concentrated area of your body. But there are different sensations of pain. Just think of the difference in sensation between a bruise and a cut. Tattoo pain will usually be most severe during the first few minutes, after which your body should begin to adjust.

  1. If your tattoo is particularly large or detailed, the pain can become intense again toward the end, when pain- and stress-dulling hormones called endorphins may begin to fade;
  2. Some people describe the pain as a pricking sensation;

Others say it feels like bee stings or being scratched. A thin needle is piercing your skin, so you can expect at least a little pricking sensation. As the needle moves closer to the bone, it may feel like a painful vibration.

What can you not do when you first get a tattoo?

If your artist used plastic wrap to protect your tattoo, you can remove it after a couple of hours. For those with a clear bandage, like Saniderm, follow your artist’s guidelines as many have different suggestions. Wei, for example, says you can leave it on for three to five days, while Fergus usually recommends taking it off after 24 to 48 hours.

  1. During this time, excess blood, ink, and plasma may pool up underneath the film — it’s totally normal, Ariel W;
  2. says;
  3. Be sure to peel it off slowly with clean hands;
  4. After taking off both bandages, aftercare is about the same;

Wash off the tattoo with mild, antibacterial soap, like Dr. Bronner’s Baby Unscented Pure Castile Soap , and lukewarm water. Let it air dry if you can, or pat it dry with a clean paper towel, Wei says. From there, Fergus recommends not moisturizing it for a day, but other artists, like Kang, may tell you to smooth on a thin layer of a healing ointment, like Aquaphor , two to three times a day for three days.

After that, you can swap it out for an unscented, dye-free, lightweight body lotion, such as the Aveeno Daily Moisturizing Lotion or Lubriderm Daily Moisture Lotion , and apply it just as often for two weeks.

Garner also is a fan of unscented shea butter. ( Allure editors swear by Eu’Genia’s. ) “I just feel like it’s been working better for me for healing,” she says. “Because the shea butter is kind of oily, the tattoo still looks moisturized even when it’s peeling.

  1. ” While it’s healing, don’t pick, scratch, or itch your tattoo — even if it’s flaking, Wei says;
  2. Also, avoid submerging your tattoo, so stay out of pools, hot tubs, and any bodies of water for two weeks;

Don’t expose your tattoo to the sun either. “Once it is completely healed, please use sunscreen to protect the tattoo and reduce the effects of the sun ,” she adds. As for washing your tattoo after that first time, Abad recommends only doing so when you shower.

What hurts more linework or shading?

Tattoo Shading – Unlike outlining, shading isn’t necessary for every tattoo. Color and shading simply provide more dimension than line work. Contrary to what you might expect, many people report that the shading hurts significantly less than the outlining of the tattoo.

If you’ve already made it through your line work, pat yourself on the back. You’ve likely conquered the most painful part already. You can do this! That said, you should understand what is happening during the shading process.

It’s not the simple, single pass of an outline. Rather, your artist will be packing ink into your skin repeatedly, often for hours at a time, over the same area—which is why some people mistakenly expect it to be more uncomfortable than outlining. But remember: Outlining is very detailed, and your tattoo artist uses needles of a different size for the process.

Should I take painkillers before a tattoo?

– To reduce tattoo pain, follow these tips before and during your appointment:

  • Choose a licensed tattoo artist. Experienced artists usually take less time to finish tattoos. Before your appointment, meet the artist to get a feel for their personality and the shop’s hygiene.
  • Pick a less sensitive body part. Talk to your artist about placement. (See the table above. )
  • Get enough sleep. Your body can handle pain better after a good night’s rest.
  • Avoid pain relievers. Don’t take aspirin or ibuprofen for 24 hours before your session. These medications can thin your blood, which may prolong the tattooing process.
  • Don’t get a tattoo when you’re sick. Sickness heightens your sensitivity to pain. If your immune system is struggling, your tattoo will take longer to heal.
  • Stay hydrated. Getting tattooed on dry skin hurts. Before your session, keep your skin hydrated by drinking enough water.
  • Eat a meal. Low blood sugar increases pain sensitivity. Eat beforehand to prevent dizziness from nerves or hunger.
  • Avoid alcohol. Don’t drink alcohol for at least 24 hours before your appointment. Alcohol heightens pain sensitivity, dehydrates your body, and thins your blood.
  • Wear loose clothing. Dress in comfortable clothes, especially over the area you’re getting tattooed.
  • Breathe deeply. Stay relaxed by practicing steady breathing.
  • Distract yourself. Bring your headphones and listen to music. If your artist is open to conversation, or if you’re allowed to bring a friend, talk to them to distract yourself.
  • Ask about skin-numbing cream. Your artist can recommend a numbing cream for getting tattooed.
  • Communicate with your artist. If the pain is too much, let your artist know. A good artist will let you take breaks.
You might be interested:  How Long Does A Thigh Tattoo Take To Heal?

After your session, follow your artist’s aftercare instructions. Good tattoo aftercare will promote proper healing and reduce the risk of infection.

Can you shower after a tattoo?

The bottom line. Showering with a new tattoo isn’t only fine; it’s necessary for the sake of good hygiene. As long as you follow the aftercare instructions your tattoo artist gives you, and you’re careful not to rub or soak your tattoo, showering shouldn’t interfere with the healing process of your new ink.

Do I need to shave before a tattoo?

For those with tattoos, some prefer to have a hairfree appearance to give better visibility to their body artwork. That doesn’t necessarily mean shaving and removing hair all over to see the tattoos, but choosing the areas of their body where they wish to have better clarity of the line work and shading of their ink. What To Expect When Getting A Tattoo Always shave after a tattoo is fully healed Always ensure your tattoo is 100% healed before shaving the area. Shaving when the tattoo is still going through its healing process could lead to infection, scabbing and loss of ink. Tattoos go through several stages of healing (even the smallest ones). Once the scabs have shed and the new layer of skin has formed over the tattoo, then it’s usually safe to shave, however, always check its sensitivity in case the skin is still irritated.

  • Running your fingertips over the tattoo to make sure it’s flat and no bumps remain will also help determine if it’s ready for shaving;
  • Healing usually takes anywhere from 5 days – 2 weeks but there are always exceptions where they take longer to heal;

Allow your skin to heal for as long as you can after it looks and feels healed. Shaving won’t affect tattoos as long as they’re healed and you take care of the skin when you do begin shaving it, keeping it exfoliated (to prevent ingrown hairs) and hydrated.

Tattoo’d skin is exactly the same as regular skin once it’s healed so the same care applies. Step One – Pre Shave Preparation Taking a shower before shaving your body anywhere will always help to soften hair.

We’d recommend a light exfoliation once a week to keep dead skin from the surface and to promote hair growth (so you don’t end up with ingrown hairs beneath the tattoo). Choose a good pre-shave product to protect the skin before putting a blade against it.

There are plenty of gels and foams on the market and it can largely depend on skin type, as well as the size of the area you’re looking to shave. King of Shaves Sensitive Advanced Pre Shave Oil ensures maximum glide for a blade to effortlessly move with the contours of the skin.

Gilette’s Fusion5 Ultra Sensitive Men’s Shaving Foam is a cheaper alternative for larger areas. Its foam formula is suitable for sensitive skin containing Aloe Vera for a soothing shave. If you’re only using a cartridge razor to shave over your tattoos, both products work great with electric shavers with wet shaving options too for clean shaves.

Step Two – Shaving If you’re opting for a cartridge or traditional razor, always ensure you have a new, fresh blade for shaving. Blades quickly dull, rust and contain bacteria, so a new blade is a must when shaving over your tattoos.

Gillette razors are great choice where blades can be changed weekly and offer many kits with multiple blades to keep you stocked up for months. Take a look at the Gillette Fusion Proglide Flexball Pack but if you’re looking for a shaver with more longevity and multiple options, the Philips Series 5000 Showerproof Body Groomer is great for all over body shaving, including the chest, back and groin area.

Shave in the direction of the grain and only go over the same patches of skin where necessary to catch any stray hairs. Once shaved, rinse the skin off with cold water to close the hair follicles and apply a moistoriser such as Bluebeards Revenge Cooling Moisturiser to keep skin hydrated and soothed.

Hair doesn’t grow back thicker either but you will have to consider the upkeep of regularly shaving the area of your tattoos when the hair starts to grow back. However, you will find that tattoos look less cloudy and more defined. Getting a tattoo and wondering if you should shave for a tattoo? Although you can shave before your tattoo, it’s not necessary.

Whats the most painful place to get a tattoo?

What can I take before a tattoo to ease the pain?

Avaliani recommends taking three or four Ibuprofen tablets an hour before your appointment so that your pain tolerance is higher by the time you feel the needle (which, by the way, looks more like the tip of a pen than a needle, in case that word scares you like it scared me).

Do tattoos hurt for the first time?

For those worried about pain, Lavriv says tattoo newbies should start small. ‘I always recommend getting a smaller piece — under an hour — as a first tattoo,’ she says. ‘Tattoo pain is a very subjective thing and while it can feel like not a big deal to some people, it can be excruciating for others.

Where is the least painful spot for a tattoo?

Least painful to tattoo – The least painful places to get a tattoo are areas of your body with fewer nerve endings. Think outer shoulder, calf, buttocks, and outer arm. While people generally focus on the location on the body, Stanley Kovak , a cosmetic physician, theorizes that pain is more about size.

What do you do first 24 hours after a tattoo?

Aftercare for Your Tattoo – So, how can you make sure that new tattoo is something you don’t end up regretting? Follow these steps while your new tattoo heals.

  1. Be sure your artist covers your new tattoo in a thin layer of petroleum jelly and a bandage.
  2. Remove the bandage after 24 hours. Gently wash the tattoo with antimicrobial soap and water  and be sure to pat dry.
  3. Apply a layer of antibacterial/Vaseline ointment twice a day, but don’t put on another bandage.
  4. Gently wash your tattoo area twice a day with soap and water and gently pat dry before reapplying the antibacterial/Vaseline ointment.
  5. Keep applying a moisturizer or ointment after you clean it to keep it moist.

You should repeat this process for 2 to 4 weeks. Also try not to wear clothes that will stick to your tattoo, and avoid swimming and the sun for about 2 weeks. And take cool showers. Scalding hot water will not only hurt, but it can also fade the ink. Wear a physical blocker sunscreen  with at least 7% zinc oxide sunscreen during the daylight hours and/or cover it up (with clothing, a bandage).

How do you sleep with a new tattoo?

Can you sleep on a new tattoo? – In an ideal world, you would be able to sleep and not have to worry about the tattoo. Actually, tattoos are effectively open wounds. This means that you need to take some precautions. Going days without sleep isn’t an option.

People have different techniques. If you can, you should try to avoid sleeping directly on the tattoo. For instance, if you have a tattoo on your back, try to sleep on your front and let the tattoo breathe.

A lot of tattoo artists recommend sleeping with the wrap that was put on. Others recommend re-wrapping, or just applying healing ointment and keeping the tattoo clean. The important thing is avoiding infection.

What is tattoo etiquette?

Let the artist take lead on the design Most tattoo artists are in fact artists. They want to tattoo you with their own art. This isn’t just a creative preference. Tattooers generally have perfected a certain style (or styles). Their best designs and their best execution will be in this style(s). They want to be confident and and proud of your tattoo.

  • Don’t send them a picture of another artist’s work and say “I want this tattoo”.
  • Don’t be surprised if the artist does not want to tattoo in a style that is not their own.
  • Do share reference images for the subject matter you like.
  • Do share reference images from the artist’s own portfolio and say “I like the style you used here. “

Be as specific as you need to be. Not more or less. Artists love it when you give them creative freedom but don’t do it unless you really do want them to make all creative decisions. If you have something specific in mind, tell them.

  • Don’t tell the artist “you have complete freedom” and then come to the shop and make a lot of corrections.
  • Do tell the artist any specifics you have in mind before they work on the design!
You might be interested:  Beautiful Tramp Stamp Tattoos That Stand The Test Of Time

New tattoos are always a better option than “adding on” to, or modifying an existing tattoos. Most artists would rather not work with another artist’s tattoo. It adds constraints to their design potential and it forces them to either: (a) Vandalize an existing, nice tattoo or (b) Have their work seen alongside an existing ugly tattoo. Either way, this won’t be a portfolio piece and won’t get the best work from the artist.

  1. That’s not possible if you give excessive direction or if you force the artist outside of their core styles;
  2. Also, remember that good artists won’t copy another artist’s design so don’t ask;
  3. Consider: do you really need your existing tattoo to keep growing and becoming more and more of a Frankenstein’s Monster? Or can you offer new real estate to each artist? Cover-ups are a different story;

If you need a cover-up, you need a coverup. Not all artists are technically capable of good cover-ups and not all artists like to do them because of the additional constraint but it’s always worth asking.

  • Don’t think of your tattoo as a house you are continually remodelling.
  • Do think of tattoos more like paintings you are commissioning. Give the artist a clean canvas.
  • Do consider going back to the same artist for modifying or touching up an existing tattoo.

Don’t design by committee There’s nothing worse than customers who bring an opinionated friend or loved one to “help” them with design decisions. You hired the artist to help you with design. Adding a third party can complicate the already-delicate balance of artist/client in the design process. The more opinions you solicit, the harder and more confusing the process will be. Only you know what you want and the artist can help you.

  • Don’t bring a friend or spouse to speak for you.
  • Don’t text photos of the design to friends asking for their opinion.
  • Do tell your opinionated friends to quiet down if they become too involved in your tattoo design process.

Limit your party to yourself + 1 max Speaking of bringing others with you… consider visiting the shop alone for your appointment. Most shops are limited in their space and cannot accommodate your friends. Not only that, your friends might think it sounds fun to be at the shop while you get tattooed, but it’s not. Your friends will be bored.

  • Don’t bring extra people with you to be tattooed without asking the shop first. Most shops don’t want your friends sleeping in the waiting area while you get tattooed.
  • Do limit your party to just you or one other if you must and encourage your friends to go do something while you get tattooed so they don’t sleep in the waiting area.

Let the artist concentrate while you get tattooed Even the most experienced artists need to limit stressors during their tattooing. Tattooing requires intense concentration. Some artists love to gab while tattooing but others prefer to be quiet. Let the artist take the lead or ask them what they prefer.

  • Do bring a book to read or movie to watch provided you can do it without moving.
  • Do let your artist take the lead on whether or not to talk.
  • Don’t stare at the tattoo while your artist is working. This is stressful.
  • Don’t talk too much unless your artit is the chatty one.

Sit still! For obvious reasons, you never want to move while there is a tattoo needle inking your skin. If you might have trouble with pain, consider a numbing cream in advance of getting tattooed (ask your artist first). If you’re jumpy, you’re wasting tattooing time and risking mistakes. Generally though, you’re stressing out the artist which can mean not getting their best work.

  • Don’t move unexpectedly.
  • Don’t talk if you’re getting your ribs tattooed.
  • Do let the artist know if you need to move or stretch.
  • Do let the artist know If you think the furniture can be adjusted to be more comfortable.
  • Do consider topical numbing cream in advance of your tattoo if you’re worried about tolerating the pain (ask the artist first though)

Tipping It is customary to tip tattoo artists just like (in the US) it is customary to tip restaurant wait staff. Because it’s customary, not tipping is seen as a sign of being dissatisfied with your tattoo.

  • Do expect to tip when budgeting for your tattoo.
  • Do tip the artist directly and in cash.
  • Do tip big (e. 20%+) if you love your tattoo.
  • Do talk to your artist whenever you feel something isn’t being handled well (consultation, design, etc). A small tip (or no tip) shouldn’t be the only sign that you are dissatisfied.

Aftercare There are many different aftercare procedures out there. Always follow the artist’s own aftercare instructions because you and the artist are both responsible for the quality of your tattoo.

  • Do make sure to get precise instructions for aftercare from your artist.
  • Do feel OK to ask questions during the healing process if something seems wrong.
  • Do a little research about healing tattoos to know what’s normal. Scabbing is normal. Ink on the bandage is normal. Looking faded in the first couple of weeks is normal.

Touch-ups Most tattoos will not need touching up — at least for many years. However, sometimes ink does fall out or fade. This can happen for many reasons. The artist’s tattoo technique matters but it’s just half the story. Healing/fading is also affected by aftercare, your biology, the placement on the body (bendy parts like wrists, elbows, fingers, etc will fade more and faster).

  • Do wait 30 days before even considering a touch-up. Tattoos can look less-than-perfect while healing and need 30 days to be completely healed.
  • Do take good care of your tattoo following artist instructions and avoiding any strong sun exposure, rubbing, or soaking of the tattoo area while it’s healing.
  • Don’t expect the tattoo ink to look as vibrant as it did the day of your tattoo. Tattoo ink sits under the top layer of skin so, once healed, you’ll be looking at the ink through the top layer of skin.
  • Don’t be confrontational with the artist about your touch-up. Your artist cares as much as you do about the tattoo looking great so there’s no reason to take an aggressive posture if you have concerns about your tattoo.

What can I take before a tattoo to ease the pain?

Avaliani recommends taking three or four Ibuprofen tablets an hour before your appointment so that your pain tolerance is higher by the time you feel the needle (which, by the way, looks more like the tip of a pen than a needle, in case that word scares you like it scared me).

What helps with tattoo pain?

– Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen, may help ease the pain following a tattooing procedure. However, it is unclear if acetaminophen can effectively prevent pain from tattooing procedures. Instead, some tattoo artists recommend topical skin-numbing products.

These products may contain 5% lidocaine. That said, there is a possibility of experiencing a contact allergy from products such as these. A person should have their tattoo artist apply the product to a small area of skin 24 hours before the procedure, to see whether or not it causes a reaction.

It is also important to follow manufacturer directions for the maximum dose limits, especially when applying topical products to large areas of the skin. Once the procedure is complete, the tattoo artist should provide self-care steps and explain how to deal with any pain after the procedure.

How painful is getting a tattoo?

How bad do tattoos hurt? – There’s no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to how much pain you’ll feel when getting tattooed. But if you’re wondering what type of pain to expect, Caranfa says the experience is comparable to the feeling of a cat scratch or a sunburn.

“Long periods of irritation and tenderness are what make you feel any discomfort,” Caranfa says. “The sensation of a tattoo needle is very dull compared to a syringe [and needle], it isn’t the needle that causes discomfort as much as it is prolonged tenderness of being tattooed.

” Importantly, different people will report varying experiences of pain based on their individual nervous systems and pain thresholds , says Channelle Charest , a California-based tattoo artist and Co-founder of tattoo scheduling platform Tatstat. Other factors that could affect pain during tattooing include:

  • Age: Studies suggest aging decreases your pain sensitivity , meaning elderly people might experience less pain when getting tattooed. Researchers have yet to determine why this happens but note that the size of parts of the brain that process pain decreases with age.
  • Sex: People who are biologically female are more likely to experience greater pain intensity, a lower pain threshold, and a lower tolerance for induced pain compared to people who are biologically male. However, research is still emerging.
  • Psychological expectations : If you go into a tattoo expecting it to be an excruciating experience, this might affect how much pain you actually feel. Studies suggest that people who feel anxious about and “catastrophize” pain before a procedure often experience higher levels of pain intensity and distress than people with “neutral” pain expectations.
You might be interested:  How Much To Tip On Tattoo?

Fortunately, most of the discomfort you feel while getting tattooed will end when your tattoo artist puts down the tattoo gun. “The sensation is only when the needle is in you,” Caranfa says, adding that while it’s typical to experience some soreness, swelling, and itchiness in the days after getting tattooed, it’s “not debilitating.

Should you shower before a tattoo?

So you’re considering your first tattoo. That’s cool—but don’t rush it. You need time to think about what you want needled into your skin, how badly you want it, and how to get it done safely (namely, by someone who knows what they’re doing). Since there are so many things to consider before you get a tattoo, we presented a few common ink-quiries to Tiffany Tattooz, owner and tattoo artist of Ink Gallery Tattoo Shop in Woodland Park, NJ, and mainstay of Black Ink Crew on VH1.

  • If you’re in the market for your first ink, read through her starter’s guide;
  • It’ll inform every decision you make about the emblem you’ll soon wear for (hopefully) the rest of your days;
  • What are the least (and most) painful body parts to tattoo? Everyone has a different type of pain tolerance when it comes to tattoos, but most seem to experience the least amount of pain in the arm and thigh areas;

These areas of the body have more fat tissue and less nerve density, which in turn causes less discomfort. The most painful will have to be the ribs, feet, and middle chest. There is less fat, the skin is very thin, and the bone is closer to the surface of the skin, allowing one to feel the sensitivity of the needle more.

What actually happens to the skin while receiving a tattoo? Basically, ink is being deposited and penetrated into the dermis layer of the skin. The pigments are too big to be fought off by our white blood cells, so they just pretty much stay in the dermis layer of our skin forever.

How should someone prepare for a tattoo? It’s recommended that you wash the area of the skin or take a shower before coming in to get the tattoo, especially if you work with paint, construction materials, garbage, or sewage. Although it’s my job as an artist to make sure the area is cleaned, cleaning up beforehand does help reduce the risk of other unclean body parts contaminating the clean area.

On site, I always make sure to first clean the area being tattooed. I’ll then shave the customer’s skin and then spray it with alcohol to make sure the skin is fully sterile. How long do tattoos take to heal? Tattoos need about two weeks to heal, on average, although sometimes it can take more time, depending on the client’s skin and how long it took to complete the tattoo.

I tell my clients to keep the bandage on for 8-12 hours, because it allows plasma—our body’s natural way of healing itself—to regenerate skin tissue, thus allowing a quicker healing process and preventing scabbing. Once the wrap is taken off, I tell clients to use a fragrance-free antibacterial soap to wash the tattoo.

They should use lukewarm water—never hot water. However, after completely washing the tattoo, they have to pour cold water on the skin to close up the pores. How should someone care for their tattoo immediately after inking? Wash the tattoo twice a day for the first three or four days, since tattoos are pretty much an open wound at this point.

After washing the tattoo, pat it dry with a paper towel. (Don’t use a cloth towel, because cloth towels hold bacteria. ) Wait 15 minutes and then apply a light coat of moisturizing ointment with clean hands. Apply the ointment twice a day (morning and night) for two days.

  • Less is better: Using too much ointment will cause problems with healing and fade the tattoo, since thick ointment can clog the pores;
  • After the second day, switch to a fragrance-free lotion and apply 3-5 times a day depending on the consistency, for up to two weeks;

Do not pick or scratch your tattoo during the healing process. Hands should always be cleaned when applying any ointment or lotion on skin. You will have to avoid being in the sun or pool for two weeks, and, most important, in order for the tattoo to stay vibrant for many years, you should always use sun block when outside.

  • How often do people typically need to get their tattoos touched up? It really all comes down to how they take care of their tattoos and if there were any scabs that have formed;
  • If there were any issues during the healing process, then you will be able to tell within two weeks whether or not a tattoo needs to be touched up;

If there are no issues, then I would say a tattoo can hold up well for 10 years before seeing that it needs to be brand new again. As you get older, so does your ink. If one is always in the sun it will dull out the ink in your tattoo way sooner than someone who is never in the sun.

What’s your advice to someone who isn’t sure if they should get a tattoo? Don’t do it until you wake up one day and say, “I’m ready and I know what I want. ” I never recommend someone to get a tattoo if they’re unsure of their ideas or whether or not tattoos are for them.

It’s a permanent procedure—so you want to make sure that you’re confident having something etched on you for the rest your life. If you finally find yourself ready to get tattooed, then the next big step is to find an artist who “specializes” in the “style” you want.

Review their portfolio to see if you like his or her work, and then you can set an appointment. How do you know if your tattoo artist is legit? You can tell by their recognition, their portfolio, how long their wait is, and their prices.

How do prices vary for tattoos? Some artists charge hourly, or some charge by the piece. For larger tattoos, however, some will charge by the day (half-day sessions might be $400-600, or full-day sessions around $1,000 or more). 10. Is it easy to remove a tattoo? Painful? Laser tattoo removal is a painful process and requires many sessions. How has tattoo technology progressed in recent years?

  • Ink: There are now quality ink brands that last longer on the skin throughout the years. Some black inks are so dark, I can’t even use them for shading in a realistic tattoo—I can only use them for solid black work like tribal tattoos.
  • Machinery: New tattoo machines called “rotaries” make no sound while tattooing and feel lightweight on the wrist and hand, which decreases the chances of tendinitis and carpal tunnel for the artist. It almost feels like you’re tattooing with a pencil.
  • Cost: I now even have a “wireless power supply” to run my tattoo machine—it actually keeps track of how long I’ve spent with the client, and how long I’ve been actually “tattooing” them. This never existed nine years ago. The power supply even shows me how much my clients should pay based off the time I spent on them.
  • Needles: Previous needles required different machines to use. Now, there are needle cartridges that you can attach and detach so it can all be done from one machine.
  • Resources: Even social media, YouTube, and online podcasts have made it much easier to learn and grow as an artist quickly. The resources are enormous.

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!.