What Is A Good First Tattoo?

What Is A Good First Tattoo
While upper arms, forearms, thighs, and calves are all great locations, Brodsky says elbow and knee tattooing can be ‘kind of spicy, but it’s still doable. ‘ Tattoos on the torso hurt worse, she explains, because the skin is softer and lighter.

What would be the best first tattoo?

Where should my first tattoo be?

Now I am going to preface this with something that you probably don’t want to hear. All tattoos hurt, no matter what. A tattoo by definition is pain; it is a magical combination of blood, needles, and ink that are all used to create beautiful works of art. The pain is just part of the price you pay to have such a unique and gorgeous addition to your body.

Yet not all tattoos are created equal and some areas on the body are better suited for inking than others. For a tattoo virgin, you want to ease into the world of tattooing with an area of the body that is less sensitive to needles on the skin.

When I hear that someone got their first tattoo on their ribs or feet, I automatically cringe. Despite the fact that these areas are some of the most popular places for a first tattoo (you can thank tumblr and Pintrest for that), they are also some of the most painful places to get a tattoo.

The ribs, hands, feet, knees, and elbows are considered to be some of the most painful places on the body to be tattooed because they are extremely boney and don’t offer much cushion for the impact of a tattoo needle.

By contrast, areas that are more “meaty” tend to be less painful and are recommended for people who have never gotten a tattoo before. One exception is the underside of the upper arm—while it’s certainly not boney a ton of nerves run down there so it can also be excruciating.

Every tattoo is going to feel painful for a rookie but hopefully this list will help to guide you if you’re nervous about the pain. Note: the pain rating scale is relative and everyone’s body takes pain differently.

You may find that a tattoo on your thigh hurts way more than one of the same size on your ribs. In the end, after the artist puts down their machine and wipes down your tattoo, the pain of being tattooed is essentially over with. After your tattoo heals you’ll probably forget how painful your tattoo was in the moment and will be itching to get your next piece. Wrist What Is A Good First Tattoo Compared to many other parts of the body, the wrist is not a bad spot for a first tattoo. The skin is thinner on the wrist which makes it hurt a little bit more than some places, but because the wrist is smaller it will be a relatively quick process. It tends to hurt more the closer you get to your hand, so if you are still nervous try asking your artist if your design can be moved up slightly. Thigh What Is A Good First Tattoo This is without a doubt one of the easiest places to get a tattoo. Maybe I am a bit biased because it was my first tattoo, but getting a thigh piece is really no big deal. A thigh tattoo is also a great place to get a tattoo because the positioning allows you to lie down comfortably and because it’s not on your torso, you can use your breathing to help deal with the pain. Pain Rating: 3 out of 10 Shoulder What Is A Good First Tattoo The shoulder isn’t too bad for a first tattoo. While it is technically on your shoulder blade, the muscle provides a bit of cushioning for the needles. The shoulder is ideal for a first tattoo because it allows for someone to get a large scale tattoo without committing to having visible tattoos. Unless you’re wearing a tank top, a shirt with an open back, or are shirtless, you will most likely be able to easily hide this tattoo from view. Forearm What Is A Good First Tattoo This area was a breeze to have tattooed. The forearm is a soft and fleshy area that takes well to the stress of a tattoo. This area is also great for a first time tattoo because it doesn’t swell up too much and it is easy to avoid sleeping on at night. Pain Rating: 3 out of 10. Calves What Is A Good First Tattoo This muscular area of the body is superb for taking the impact of a tattoo machine and you’ll be happy that you got your first tattoo on your calves. The calves offer a great canvas for a first time tattoo because they essentially offer the same dimensions as an arm piece but give you more opportunity to be subtle with your body modifications because it’s easily coverable. The calves allow you to lie on your stomach during a tattoo and one might even find themselves drifting off during the process. Bicep What Is A Good First Tattoo The bicep is a great place for a first tattoo, especially if you want to cover a lot of ground in one sitting. The bicep, like the thigh, is fairly muscular which means that a tattoo machine won’t be running against your bones. The bicep is also an excellent place for a first tattoo because it allows you to get comfortable in a chair and to easily talk with your artist to pass the time.

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What age is good for a first tattoo?

You have to be 18 to get one. – Yep, like voting and scary movies, you’ve gotta be 18 to get inked. Some states will allow you to get a tattoo earlier with a parent’s permission while you’re still underaged, though.

What’s the least painful spot to get a tattoo?

Least painful to tattoo – The least painful places to get a tattoo are areas of your body with fewer nerve endings. Think outer shoulder, calf, buttocks, and outer arm. While people generally focus on the location on the body, Stanley Kovak , a cosmetic physician, theorizes that pain is more about size.

How long does a small tattoo take?

Expect about half an hour to an hour for a simple, small tattoo. Keep in mind, however, a small tattoo with lots of color, line work, details, or a tricky placement could take several hours. Small tattoos are great for people who don’t want to go through a lengthy tattoo process, but still want some cool ink.

Should I get a small tattoo first?

A few more tips for choosing the right tattoo design – So, you thought choosing a tattoo design was simple? Well, think again, although choosing a tattoo design isn’t rocket science. But there’s more to it than one would think, especially if you’re new to tattoos. Here are some other things to consider when picking the right design for you:

  • Small, highly-detailed tattoos generally don’t age well. Your tattoos naturally fade as your body ages. Fine lines become thicker. Darker colors fade into less dominant colors. Crisp edges grow softer. Those changes look even more drastic on smaller tattoos that have a lot of detail, as well as on tattoos that are photorealistic.
  • During the design-choosing process imagine your tattoo being extra large. Take a smaller element of a larger design and make that your tattoo.
  • The simpler your tattoo design – especially your first design – the better. That’s especially true for smaller tattoos, but it’s a good rule for tattoos of any size. Don’t add too many things to the design, but keep it to one main subject, one secondary subject, and one background element.
  • Choose a design that includes your favorite colors, favorite images, and a style that you like.
  • Think it through and then think it through some more. Give yourself a few months to think about your tattoo design. If you still haven’t soured on the idea, then there’s no reason you shouldn’t get it.
  • On the other hand, spontaneity is sometimes a good thing (especially if you’re in a rational frame of mind) when deciding suddenly to get a tattoo.
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You should never make a rash decision about something that’s as permanent as a tattoo, even if it’s a decision you make spontaneously. But many people who made a spur-of-the-moment decision to get a tattoo end up having regrets about it. Choose a design that you won’t outgrow, such as political statements or pop culture references that will seem incredibly dated a few years from now. In today’s fast-moving world with its rapidly-changing tastes, some things seem outdated in even in a year.

How do you prepare for a tattoo?

Who should not get a tattoo?

Eczema – There are different types and degrees of eczema. Those that seldom have or have small flares are better candidates to be tattooed. While those with frequent, large and severe eczema should speak with their doctor before speaking to a tattoo a shop.

People with eczema can have more sensitive skin, which could lead to allergic reactions to the pigments in tattoo ink. The process of getting a tattoo itself has the chance to cause skin irritations or flare ups – as the skin is punctured thousands of times and foreign particles (ink) is deposited below the skin to create a design.

If your new tattoo triggers a flare up, it runs the risks of not healing well and lengthy healing time – which also makes it more vulnerable to infection.

What should you not do before getting a tattoo?

What does getting a tattoo feel like?

– It’s no surprise that getting a tattoo often hurts. Getting one involves receiving many microwounds over a concentrated area of your body. But there are different sensations of pain. Just think of the difference in sensation between a bruise and a cut. Tattoo pain will usually be most severe during the first few minutes, after which your body should begin to adjust.

  • If your tattoo is particularly large or detailed, the pain can become intense again toward the end, when pain- and stress-dulling hormones called endorphins may begin to fade;
  • Some people describe the pain as a pricking sensation;

Others say it feels like bee stings or being scratched. A thin needle is piercing your skin, so you can expect at least a little pricking sensation. As the needle moves closer to the bone, it may feel like a painful vibration.

How painful is a tattoo?

How bad do tattoos hurt? – There’s no one-size-fits-all answer when it comes to how much pain you’ll feel when getting tattooed. But if you’re wondering what type of pain to expect, Caranfa says the experience is comparable to the feeling of a cat scratch or a sunburn.

“Long periods of irritation and tenderness are what make you feel any discomfort,” Caranfa says. “The sensation of a tattoo needle is very dull compared to a syringe [and needle], it isn’t the needle that causes discomfort as much as it is prolonged tenderness of being tattooed.

” Importantly, different people will report varying experiences of pain based on their individual nervous systems and pain thresholds , says Channelle Charest , a California-based tattoo artist and Co-founder of tattoo scheduling platform Tatstat. Other factors that could affect pain during tattooing include:

  • Age: Studies suggest aging decreases your pain sensitivity , meaning elderly people might experience less pain when getting tattooed. Researchers have yet to determine why this happens but note that the size of parts of the brain that process pain decreases with age.
  • Sex: People who are biologically female are more likely to experience greater pain intensity, a lower pain threshold, and a lower tolerance for induced pain compared to people who are biologically male. However, research is still emerging.
  • Psychological expectations : If you go into a tattoo expecting it to be an excruciating experience, this might affect how much pain you actually feel. Studies suggest that people who feel anxious about and “catastrophize” pain before a procedure often experience higher levels of pain intensity and distress than people with “neutral” pain expectations.

Fortunately, most of the discomfort you feel while getting tattooed will end when your tattoo artist puts down the tattoo gun. “The sensation is only when the needle is in you,” Caranfa says, adding that while it’s typical to experience some soreness, swelling, and itchiness in the days after getting tattooed, it’s “not debilitating.

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How much do tattoos cost?

Factors of Average Tattoo Prices – There is a lot that goes into figuring out the cost of your new tattoo. It isn’t a straight forward answer. Things like materials, size, location, and type of tattoo affect the price. On average you can expect to charge $50-100 for a small tattoo, up to $200 for a medium tattoo and over $250 for a large tattoo.

How do I prepare for tattoo pain?

Do tattoos stop hair from growing?

Tattoo Technique and Your Skin – Our skin is complicated, and creating a permanent tattoo requires a proper procedure — a needle pierces through the skin, and pigment is inserted into the dermal layer. Now, you may be thinking, well, isn’t that the same place in which the hair follicle is located? Let us explain. What Is A Good First Tattoo Tattoo artists should shave the area in which they’re about to tattoo so they can work more precisely and see more clearly.

Will hair grow over tattoos?

The Hair Growing – Now, depending on the area on the body, the hair will either grow or it won’t grow. If the area didn’t have any hair before the tattoo, it won’t have hair after the tattoo, as one would assume. Some people think that tattoo healing promotes hair growth, but that is not true in cases where there hasn’t been any hair in the first place.

But, what about the areas where there was hair, and you had to shave it? Well, a simple answer is; yes, the hair will grow back, regardless of the tattoo! The hair may not grow as fast as it would usually do after a razor shave.

The skin is damaged after the tattooing process, so the focus of the body is on wound healing first. Therefore, the hair growth cycle may be delayed for a few days in certain body areas. What we mean by this is the following; If the tattooed area is extra hairy, the hair may take some time to get back to the hairiness and hair thickness it used to have.

Should you get a big tattoo for your first?

Some lettering may need to be enlarged so they can be legible over time. And if you’re hoping for it to be on the smaller side because you think it’ll be easy to start with, ‘that’s totally fine, but the tattoo is not going to hurt any less,’ Garner says.

Will my first tattoo hurt?

For those worried about pain, Lavriv says tattoo newbies should start small. ‘I always recommend getting a smaller piece — under an hour — as a first tattoo,’ she says. ‘ Tattoo pain is a very subjective thing and while it can feel like not a big deal to some people, it can be excruciating for others.

Is having a tattoo a sin?

Sunni Islam [ edit ] – The majority of Sunni Muslims believe tattooing is a sin, because it involves changing the natural creation of God, inflicting unnecessary pain in the process. Tattoos are classified as dirty things, which is prohibited in Islam.

They believe that a dirty body will directly lead to a dirty mind and will destroy their wudhu, ritual ablution. [24] Some Shafi’i scholars such as Amjad Rasheed argue that tattooing causes impurity and that tattoos were prohibited by the Prophet Muhammad.

They also claim that those who are decorated with tattoos are contaminated with najas , [25] due to potential mixture of blood and coloured pigment that remains upon the surface of the skin. [26] Blood is viewed as an impure substance, so a person with a tattoo cannot engage in several religious practices.

[27] However, in the present day, it is possible to get a tattoo without mixing dye with blood after it exits onto the outer surface of the body, leaving a possibility for a Muslim to wear a tattoo and perform a valid prayer.

Scholar Yusuf al-Qaradawi states that tattoos are sinful because they are an expression of vanity and they alter the physical creation of God. [28] According to the online South African Deobandi fatwa service called Ask-the-Imam , Muslims should remove any tattoos they have if possible or cover them in some way.

What are some good tattoo ideas?