How To Take Care Of Colored Tattoo?

How To Take Care Of Colored Tattoo

Aftercare for Your Tattoo – So, how can you make sure that new tattoo is something you don’t end up regretting? Follow these steps while your new tattoo heals.

  1. Be sure your artist covers your new tattoo in a thin layer of petroleum jelly and a bandage.
  2. Remove the bandage after 24 hours. Gently wash the tattoo with antimicrobial soap and water  and be sure to pat dry.
  3. Apply a layer of antibacterial/Vaseline ointment twice a day, but don’t put on another bandage.
  4. Gently wash your tattoo area twice a day with soap and water and gently pat dry before reapplying the antibacterial/Vaseline ointment.
  5. Keep applying a moisturizer or ointment after you clean it to keep it moist.

You should repeat this process for 2 to 4 weeks. Also try not to wear clothes that will stick to your tattoo, and avoid swimming and the sun for about 2 weeks. And take cool showers. Scalding hot water will not only hurt, but it can also fade the ink. Wear a physical blocker sunscreen  with at least 7% zinc oxide sunscreen during the daylight hours and/or cover it up (with clothing, a bandage).

How long does it take for a colored tattoo to heal?

Tattoo Healing Duration – The tattoo healing stages and duration may differ from one tattoo to the other. The healing duration depends on several factors, like;

  • The style of the tattoo
  • Whether it is grey or colored
  • The size of the tattoo
  • The location or body placement
  • The execution of the tattoo artist
  • The time the tattoo was wrapped and protected

So, taking into consideration the factors, we can determine an estimated healing duration for different tattoos;

  • Colored tattoos – the colored tattoos take the longest to heal. The reason for this lies in the very tattooing execution when coloring the tattoo. The needle has to go over every inch of the tattoo to fill it in with color, without any breaks. The increased work irritates the skin more, leading to skin trauma, and later, longer periods of scabbing and overall healing.
  • Black & grey tattoos – these tattoos heal much faster than the colored ones. The reason for this lies in the less intense approach to the skin. These tattoos often have some blank space or some light shading, which doesn’t irritate or damage the skin as much as the coloring does. Such a tattoo may take up to 3 weeks to have the surface skin healed if taken care of properly.
  • Tattoos with sensitive body placement – if a tattoo is placed in an area that has very thin skin and a lot of nerve endings, the damage to the skin might be greater. That is why any type of tattoo done in a sensitive area takes much longer to heal than expected. You may experience longer periods of redness and irritation, and the skin may even be itchier during the healing process. The overall healing duration for a sensitive tattoo may be up to 6 weeks, but there were cases where the healing lasted for several months (just the surface skin layer).

Image Source: Saved Tattoo.

Are colored tattoos hard to maintain?

It is not an easy decision determining whether you are going to go for color or black and gray tattoos. If you are thinking about getting a tattoo and have not put some serious thought into which style you are going for, you should sit down and think for a bit.

It is essential to understand here that as much as tattoos are a form of self-expression and artistic statement, they are also permanent. So, you should settle this debate of color vs. black and gray before you go see your tattoo artist.

BEST TATTOO AFTERCARE | STEP BY STEP GUIDE (By Tattoo Artist!)

Any future work that you get done on your tattoo will depend heavily on which style you go for. In this article, we will help you make up your mind by giving you a run-down of the advantages and disadvantages of color tattoos and black and gray tattoos.

  • This style of tattooing has been in existence since the very beginning of the art of tattooing;
  • It is the O;
  • G style if you will;
  • The simple reason for this is that the natural ingredients available at the time used to make tattoo ink produced mainly black and gray color;

The beauty of black and gray tattoo depends on the density and spacing used to create alluring depth and layers in the design. Let’s take a look at the pros that you can get with black and gray tattoos: 1- They Take Less Time. Since there is less ink required to create a black and gray tattoo, it is a little bit faster than colored tattoos.

Some people even say that getting black and gray tattoos is less painful as well, but that is a subjective factor and varies from person to person. 2- They are rich in Contrast. Black and gray tattoos are known for their rich contrast, and because of this trait, they are more visible on darker skin tones compared to colored tattoos.

3- They are Neutral. Another significant benefit of getting a black and gray tattoo is that it is neutral. This is a very big advantage since your black and gray tattoo will almost never create a clash with your outfit. If you are someone who loves fashion and is always changing styles, then going for a black and gray tattoo is a wise choice.

  1. Colored tattoos can make wearing specific colors difficult;
  2. On the other hand, black and gray tattoos complement whatever color you decide to wear;
  3. 4- They Last longer;
  4. This is another major factor where black and gray tattoos shine;

They last significantly longer than colored tattoos. Colored tattoos can fade over time and might need regular touch-ups to remain sharp. Black and gray tattoos are low maintenance in this regard as they don’t fade easily and do not require you to get periodic touch-ups.

A good estimate for a professionally done black and gray tattoo is 15 years without any signs of fading. That is a long, long time before you will need to go to a tattoo artist to get a touch-up. 5 – Their Versatility.

Black and gray tattoos are more versatile than colored ones as they work well with almost any design. There are certain limitations to what you can do with colored tattoos, whereas with black and gray tattoos, you can get practically any design that your heart desires.

  • 6- They are Classy & Classic;
  • There is history and class attached to black and gray tattoos;
  • They always stay in the trend and are great to look at;
  • You do not run the risk of getting something that you will regret in a few years because of the over the top color choices;

They also age well. Since then, there is no color to fade; they stand the test of time pretty well. Overall, black and gray tattoos are faster, cheaper, and classier than colored tattoos. They last much longer without any significant fading than colored tattoos.

  • However, it is crucial to go to the right tattoo artist because there is a certain level of mastery and experience involved when it comes to getting an intricate design in black and gray;
  • The most significant risk of getting a black and gray tattoo is that you end up with the wrong tattoo artist who cannot provide you with the realism that your tattoo is going to need to come to life;

Other than that, you are always safe, getting a black and gray tattoo. It is a simpler and easier tattoo that will age well and stand the test of time. The only thing to keep in mind is making sure that you absolutely love the design you want to go for and are 100% sure about it.

  • Black ink is one of the hardest to remove, so don’t get a tattoo that you would want to get rid of;
  • Color tattoos are vibrant, bright, and bold;
  • There are several advantages to getting a colored tattoo as well;

It all depends on the design that you want and what is the purpose of the tattoo. If you want your tattoo to make a statement and make you stand out, then going for colored tattoos is the better option. With colored tattoos, you can be more creative and really embody the reality of some images.

As we have mentioned earlier, it is harder to bring this realism aspect with black and gray tattoos. It can be done, but it is much more challenging as compared to colored tattoos. There is also an added benefit to getting colored tattoos.

They are easier to remove or cover-up. You can even use color tattoos to modify or cover your existing black and gray tattoos. But the point that we are trying to make here is that colored tattoos are better if you want a statement piece and want your tattoo to stand out.

Let’s take a look at some of the advantages that you get with going for a colored tattoo: 1- They are better suited for light skin tones that allows you to naturally show contrast well and to keep colors unaltered over time.

2- They give you more room for expression and allow you to get creative with your designs. It is easier to see and mood of the tattoo with color as compared to black and gray. That being said, you should really think hard and judge all aspects before you decide which style of tattoo you are going to get as there are some severe downsides to colored tattoos as well: 3- They fade.

  • Colored tattoos, when repeatedly exposed to sunlight, tend to fade easily;
  • This means that they will not age well and will need regular touch-ups to keep them looking sharp and fresh;
  • 4- They usually take more time;
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Colored tattoos take more time to complete since there is more work involved as compared to black and gray tattoos. Unless we are talking about a highly detailed black and grey realistic piece, that, compared to a colorful piece, would take approximately the same amount of time.

  • Sometimes more;
  • 5- Coloured tattoos are costly;
  • There is more work involved in getting a colored tattoo, which means that it is going to cost you more than a black and gray tattoo;
  • If you are looking to get a cover-up tattoo, then colored tattoos are the best solution for that;

If you want a statement piece that you want people to notice and see, then colored tattoos can do an excellent job at that as well. Overall, black and gray tattoos are faster than colored tattoos. Both styles have a time and a place. It all depends on what you want your tattoo to look like and what you want it to tell the world.

  1. If you want a simple tattoo that lasts and stand the test of time with grace, then black and gray is the perfect choice for you;
  2. On the other hand, if you want a tattoo that shows the world your creativity and makes a strong statement, you are better off going for a colored tattoo;

Please make sure you spend enough time thinking about which style resonates with you. It is going to define what your tattoo design ends up looking and feeling like. If you want to see more amazing designs, feel free to check our tattoos here! Written and Curated by Aureo Roma..

What can I put on my tattoo to keep color?

Tattoo Aftercare – Tattoo aftercare is one the most effective ways for you to keep your tattoo looking it’s best. This is critical to ensuring your tattoo remains healthy and does not fade. A good tattoo artist always provides tattoo aftercare recommendations specific to you. But there are general basics to follow:

  • It is important to keep your new tattoo clean and moisturized.
  • After removing the bandage covering a fresh tattoo, the area should be gently washed with lukewarm water and a mild antimicrobial soap. Splash water on the tattoo instead of running it directly under the water. Be gentle so as not to risk scratching or scabbing. Pat dry the area with a light towel, don’t rub it dry.
  • Use an antibacterial ointment recommended by your artist, such as Tattoo Goo, for the first few days following your tattoo.
  • There will be some scabbing, don’t worry, it’s part of the healing process. After the first few days continue using a mild moisturizing lotion until the scab is gone and the tattoo fully heals.

Proper tattoo aftercare includes both what to do, and what to avoid. Here are a few things to avoid during tattoo aftercare:

  • Keep the tattoo out of direct sunlight. UV rays are harmful on a fresh tattoo.
  • Avoid soaking the tattoo until is fully healed.
  • Do not scratch the tattoo. Yes, it’s tempting to pick away at the scab, but it prevents proper healing. Other than applying ointment, it’s best to avoid touching your tattoo altogether during the aftercare period.
  • Avoid drugs and alcohol soon before and after a new tattoo. It is best to avoid them the day of and an artist will turn you away if you are clearly inebriated. Until the tattoo heals they increase the odds of infection.
  • Avoid situations that wear on your new tattoo while healing. For example, wearing tight clothes or going to crowded clubs and concerts.

How long should I keep my colored tattoo wrapped?

You’ll need to keep your tattoo wrapped in cling film from one to three days. Depending on the size of your artwork this may be longer and your artist will let you know but a general rule of thumb is: Small line-work pieces – keep the cling film on for one to two days.

Why do color tattoos hurt more?

So, Do Color Tattoos Hurt More? – Generally speaking, ink color doesn’t determine the amount of pain you’ll feel. The color simply doesn’t have to do anything with the pain of the tattoo. As we mentioned, tattoo placement, your pain tolerance, and your tattooist’s technique are the main factors determining how painful the process will be.

Sure, there was a time when colored ink used to have a thicker consistency than black ink. This was an issue since it took the tattooist longer to pack the colored ink, which in itself hurts. The longer you’re getting tattooed, the higher the skin damage and the more painful the process becomes.

Nowadays, all inks are of similar consistency, so there isn’t an issue there. Now, if your tattoo artist takes a long time to complete the tattoo, you’ll experience more pain as the process goes on. Also, if the tattoo artist uses a dull needle, chances are the process will hurt more.

Sharp, new needles tend to hurt less. Now, as the needle gets worn out, it remains sharp, but it dulls out a little bit. This small difference in needle sharpness can promote faster skin damage and of course, cause more pain.

If your tattooist uses white ink highlight , you can expect more pain. This is again not because of the needle or the ink color, but rather the pain is caused by the repetition of needle penetration in one place. In order for the white ink to fully show and become saturated, the tattooist needs to go over the same area several times.

  • That is what causes skin damage and pain;
  • Now, after all of the information, we do have to point out that there are people who swear that the coloring/shading of the tattoo hurts more than the linework or tattoo outline;

Pain is a subjective thing, so it can be hard to be exact with the answer to whether color tattoos hurt more than regular ones.

What should you not do after a tattoo?

How do you keep color tattoos from fading?

Why is my tattoo fading after 3 days?

How To Take Care Of Colored Tattoo This is a bit of a trick question. The reason being, is that a tattoo “fades” to the naked eye within days of application. This occurs because as the skin heals, the top layer dies and new skin forms to take its place. During this period the epidermis typically has a faded appearance. However, this is a natural part of the tattoo healing process and as the peeling subsides and the dead skin falls away the design will once again look crisp and fresh.

  • Still, it won’t have that same deep dark tone as it did when your tattooist put his/her gun away;
  • Anyone who has received a tattoo already knows this;
  • But what you want to know now, is when can you expect a tattoo to fade in the longer term;

Let’s have a look.

Do color tattoos itch more?

[Editor’s Note]: This discussion is not in reference to the inevitable itchiness of fresh and healing tattoos. Itching is a natural part of a tattoo’s healing process, and often occurs within one to two weeks of getting tattooed. Once a tattoo is fully healed, it likely should not become itchy again.

I started getting inked the day I turned eighteen, and have acquired pieces from at least a dozen artists over the years. Throughout my tattoo journey, I’ve made sure to only go to artists who use high quality, organic ink.

But despite my focus on doing something innately unnatural with as natural of ingredients as possible, I’ve had as many issues with the red ink in two of my colorful tattoos as many other tattooed people experience. Meaning I’ve encountered bumps, rashes, slow healing speed, and general itchiness in the red—and only in the red—parts of my body art.

As a person who luckily has no allergies to anything else in the world, this has always surprised me. Red dye is notorious for causing problems, whether injected into our skin or eaten in our food. Red food dye can be entirely lab created, which is usually the format of artificial food color Red Dye #40, or less artificially made from the cochineal bug and called carmine.

Both are highly allergenic, with carmine being so particularly problematic for some people that it must be labeled as such, and not just as red dye, on packaging. In this vein, the allergenic potential for red ink in tattoos is also considered more severe than for other tattoo ink colors (though any color of tattoo ink may possibly cause allergic reaction, just like any food dye can).

Because red pigment has great staying power (think of how red hair dye is harder to fully remove than other colors), it tends to be used heavily in tattoo work. Not only are tattoos with red ink more likely to be itchy long term, allergies to red ink are typically more severe than allergies to other colors.

A 2018 study notes that “allergic contact dermatitis is the most common hypersensitivity reaction to tattoo ink, with red pigments representing the most common cause of tattoo-related allergic contact dermatitis. ” Heavy metals in red ink are often believed to be the reason it’s so difficult on our bodies.

A mercury-based metal called cinnabar used to be common in red ink, but that is no longer commonly used. According to the same 2018 study, “more recently, mercury-free organic pigments (eg, azo dyes) have been used in polychromatic tattoos due to their ability to retain color over long periods of time,” which makes it seem like metals should no longer be an issue.

They go on to state, however, that ” the composition of these new organic red tattoo pigments varies, but chemical analysis has revealed a mixture of aromatic azo compounds (eg, quinacridone), heavy metals (eg, aluminum, lead, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, iron, titanium), and intermediate reactive compounds (eg, naphthalene, 2-naphthol, chlorobenzene, benzene).

  1. ” Red tattoo ink is troublesome enough science has studied the dermatological problems from red ink and their potential medical intervention solutions;
  2. The problems go beyond just skin reactions, though, with actual cancer entering this cautionary tale;

Doctors have seen patients exhibit skin cancer tumors (aka carcinoma) in only the red parts of their tattoos, which may be made worse by ultraviolet light. Reactions to red tattoo ink aren’t necessarily immediate, but rather, can occur at any time. The American Academy of Dermatology, in addition to its mention that red ink is the most likely color to be allergenic, states allergic reactions can occur “immediately, weeks or years later” or even “decades afterward.

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” There are even internet tales of red ink reactions that occurred over a decade after a person got a tattoo. It isn’t an issue of ink quality to blame. In the referenced carcinoma patient above, organic, vegan, cruelty-free Eternal Ink had been used for the patient’s tattoo.

That’s the brand artists I go to use, and it’s considered a gold standard for quality in the tattoo artist world. Eternal Ink even goes above and beyond any laws around sterility, and has their tattoo inks certified sterile , according to the brand. Not a fan of body art? You still may have cause for concern: red pigment in permanent makeup is also more likely to be a problem than other permanent makeup tattoo ink colors.

How do you keep color tattoos vibrant?

Does lotion keep tattoos from fading?

Download Article Download Article Tattoos are a cool form of artistic expression, a fashion statement, and a unique image you get to wear on your skin all the time. You may wonder how you can keep your tattoos looking vibrant and beautiful for years to come, especially in the summer months when you can show them off in all their glory. To stop your tattoos from fading, you should apply moisturizer and sunscreen as well as clean and maintain them properly.

  1. 1 Use a dye- and fragrance-free moisturizer. Fragrances may make moisturizers smell good, but they will can cause skin irritation and slow down healing. Check that the moisturizer has no chemicals or preservatives, as these can break down the color in your tattoos. Keeping your tattoos moist can prevent them from fading.
    • Look for a dye-free, fragrance-free moisturizer at your local drugstore or online.
  2. 2 Get a cream sunscreen that is SPF 15 or higher. The sun is one of the biggest causes of fading for tattoos. Protect your tattoos from the sun by using a cream-based sunscreen rather than a spray, powder, or oil, as they may not spread properly on your skin.
    • Make sure it has broad spectrum protection against UV/UVA and UVB rays. It should also contain zinc or titanium dioxide for maximum protection against the sun.
    • If you are fair-skinned, use a higher SPF, such as SPF 30 or 60, on your tattoos.
    • Use a waterproof sunscreen if you plan to go swimming.

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  3. 3 Apply a thin layer of moisturizer and sunscreen once a day. Do not glob on a thick layer of lotion or sunscreen on your tattoos, as this can drain out the color. Instead, apply a thin layer of moisturizer, followed by a thin layer of sunscreen. Do this once a day, or multiple times a day if you plan to be in the sun for a prolonged period of time. [1]
    • Get into the habit of moisturizing your tattoos in the morning or evening so they stay fresh and bright.
    • Do not go into the sun without first applying sunscreen to your tattoos, especially if they are new.

    EXPERT TIP Burak Moreno is a Professional Tattoo Artist with over 10 years of experience. Burak is based in New York City and is a tattoo artist for Fleur Noire Tattoo Parlour in Brooklyn. Born and raised in Istanbul, Turkey, he has worked as a tattoo artist throughout Europe. He works on many different styles but mostly does bold lines and strong color. Burak Moreno Tattoo Artist The color and placement of your tattoo might affect how quickly it fades. White and yellow tattoos tend to fade the fastest, but it also depends on where the tattoo is. If the tattoo is on your hand or finger, for instance, it might fade as fast as 6 weeks.

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  1. 1 Wash your tattoos with antibacterial soap once daily. Use soap that does not contain any harsh chemicals, dyes, or fragrances.
    • If your tattoo is new and still healing, make sure you wash it well twice a day with the soap for the first few weeks.
  2. 2 Use a tattoo brightening cream once a day. Look for a brightening cream that contains natural products like vitamin E, lavender oil, and other essential oils. Make sure the cream does not contain bleach or any other harsh chemicals that can damage your skin and your tattoo.
    • Some tattoo brightening creams will take time to work effectively, usually a few weeks to one month. If you do not see results after one month, you may want to try a different brand.
  3. 3 Keep makeup, oil, and chemicals away from your tattoos. Avoid applying these products directly on your tattoos, as they can irritate your skin and fade the coloring of your art. Make sure you wash your tattoos if they appear oily or have come in contact with makeup or chemicals so they stay clean and fresh. [2]
    • If you do end up applying makeup to your tattoos to cover them up temporarily, use antibacterial soap to remove the makeup and moisturize your tattoos with lotion right away.
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  1. 1 Stay out of direct sun as much as possible. Exposing your tattoos to direct sunlight can drain out the color and fade them. Try to spend the least amount of time possible in direct sunlight, especially if your tattoo is new and still healing.
    • Wear long sleeves or pants if you go outside in the sunlight to keep your tattoos covered.
    • Always put sunscreen on your tattoos to protect them if you go outdoors in the sunlight.
  2. 2 Avoid pools, hot tubs, and long baths. Pools and hot tubs contain chemicals that can fade your tattoos. Soaking in a bath can also cause your tattoos to fade over time. Take light showers and do not scrub hard at your tattoos, as this can potentially damage them.
    • Avoiding pools, hot tubs, and long baths is especially important when you first get your tattoo, as they can impede skin healing.
  3. 3 Maintain a stable weight to prevent stretching or fading. If you have tattoos on your stomach, arms, legs, or chest, they may stretch or fade if you gain or lose significant weight in these areas. Stay fit and at the same weight by working out regularly and eating healthy so your tattoos are not at risk of becoming warped. [3]
    • If you have tattoos on your hands, wrists, feet, ankles, and the back of your neck, they may not be affected by weight gain or weight loss.
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What lotion is best for tattoos?

Should I cover my tattoo when I sleep?

This info should guide you through the care of healing your tattoo, but if you have any other questions while it is healing, do not hesitate to contact your artist directly or call the shop for immediate reply. There are no stupid questions about healing.

  1. – After your tattoo is completed, your artist will bandage your tattoo for your trip home;
  2. Leave the bandage on for one to three hours;
  3. When you take the bandage off, wash it with very warm water (as hot as is comfortable) and mild liquid hand soap (like Dr;

Bronner’s, Dial or Softsoap, just no perfumed or exfoliating body washes). Pat it dry gently with a paper towel, and let it air dry the rest of the way (never scrub the tattoo with a towel or sponge). Then you will apply a very small amount of Aquaphor Ointment or plain, unscented skin lotion (we recommend Aveeno, Lubriderm, Curel, or any of their generics) to the tattoo, just enough to lightly moisturize.

  • Your first night sleeping, your artist might recommend you re-wrap the tattoo with plastic wrap (like Saran Wrap) to sleep without the tattoo sticking to your sheets. This is generally for larger or solid-color tattoos. If your artist did not recommend re-wrapping, just let the tattoo stay exposed to air overnight.
  • Every day from then on, you will wash the tattoo in the morning and at night, and apply lotion 3 times a day or so, or whenever the tattoo feels dry or tight.
  • Always wash your hands before touching the tattoo.
  • DO NOT apply Vaseline, Neosporin, Bacitracin or any other medicated or perfumed product to your tattoo.
  • After a few days, the tattoo will form a thin scab over it, and in about a week the scab will begin to flake off in the shower. DO NOT pick or scratch at the scab, just keep it clean and moist and the scabs will all fall off by themselves in about two weeks. Picking any of the scabs off will cause faded color and damage to the skin.

During healing do NOT:

  • Wrap the tattoo after the first night (wearing breathable clothes over it is fine as long as they are not causing friction. (Keeping tattoos wrapped in plastic or bandages will stop air from getting to the tattoo, slow healing, and make gross stuff grow in there. )
  • Submerge the tattoo in water. This means baths, pools and oceans. Regular showering is fine.
  • Expose it to strong sunlight (Like outdoor activities or beach days. Walking to your car is fine)
  • Shave over the tattoo (ouch!)

When all the scabs fall off and the skin feels smooth again to the touch, it is all healed and you can shave over it again, and swim and everything else. Sometimes after the scab falls off there is a secondary shiny, raised or waxy coat over the tattoo. This is just another healing layer of skin. Continue to moisturize it and it will smooth out by itself over time. If you have any questions about your tattoo while its healing you are always welcome to come by the shop and have us check it out, or email the artist who did the tattoo with “AFTERCARE” in the subject line for an immediate response.

  • Do not slather a big, thick coat of product over it; just enough for it to stay moist and flexible;
  • If you are using Aquaphor, you can switch to a plain lotion after the first few days;
  • Lotion is generally fine for everyone, your artist will recommend if you would benefit from ointment;

If something doesn’t look perfect After your tattoo is finished healing, we’ll do our best to make it right. Sometimes with excessive scabbing, or other unpredictable reactions during healing, your skin can reject some ink, leaving a “light spot” that is closer to your skin color in the tattoo (or a line might get thinner or lighter in one spot).

  1. This is common as its unlikely your body will accept every spot of pigment uniformly, so just contact your artist via email after your tattoo is finished healing with a photo to see if a small touch up is in order;

Unless you were negligent during the care of your tattoo, touch-ups are very minor and quick, and guaranteed by our artists if you contact them about it within 3 months of getting the tattoo. Because older tattoos that have settled in fully and aged require more work to make uniform, we suggest coming in as soon as possible when it’s healed, as touch ups are performed for a fee at the artist’s discretion after 3 months.

How do I take care of my tattoo the first week?

Aftercare for Your Tattoo – So, how can you make sure that new tattoo is something you don’t end up regretting? Follow these steps while your new tattoo heals.

  1. Be sure your artist covers your new tattoo in a thin layer of petroleum jelly and a bandage.
  2. Remove the bandage after 24 hours. Gently wash the tattoo with antimicrobial soap and water  and be sure to pat dry.
  3. Apply a layer of antibacterial/Vaseline ointment twice a day, but don’t put on another bandage.
  4. Gently wash your tattoo area twice a day with soap and water and gently pat dry before reapplying the antibacterial/Vaseline ointment.
  5. Keep applying a moisturizer or ointment after you clean it to keep it moist.

You should repeat this process for 2 to 4 weeks. Also try not to wear clothes that will stick to your tattoo, and avoid swimming and the sun for about 2 weeks. And take cool showers. Scalding hot water will not only hurt, but it can also fade the ink. Wear a physical blocker sunscreen  with at least 7% zinc oxide sunscreen during the daylight hours and/or cover it up (with clothing, a bandage).

Can I drink 2 days after getting a tattoo?

Drinking before or after – That drink beforehand is not smart. Bruno Vincent/Getty Images If you’re thinking about downing some liquid courage before taking the plunge, think again. Drinking before and after getting a tattoo is a no-no. Alcohol thins your blood, which means excess bleeding. When you bleed more than normal, it can cause visibility issues for the artist, potentially compromising the quality of the design.

Excess bleeding can also thin the ink. Of course, there’s also the fact that alcohol impairs judgment, and you don’t want to make permanent decisions while impaired. And it’s not cute if you have to stop and puke in the middle of a four-hour tattoo session.

Furthermore, drinking after the fact can compromise the healing of the tattoo because of its effects on your blood, so take it easy for a bit.

Do color tattoos heal differently than black?

Colored tattoos are a little more labor-intensive with their aftercare. While caring for a healing tattoo is handled the same way, colored tattoos heal a little differently than black and grey tattoos.

How do you tell when a tattoo is fully healed?

You will know that your tattoo is completely healed when there are no scabs, the texture of your skin where the tattoo was placed is the same as a similar surface of skin, and the colors on your tattoo are no longer faded.

How should a tattoo feel after 2 days?

Traditional Tattoo Healing Method – Directly Following Your Tattoo Appointment The tattoo healing process starts as soon as you walk out of the tattoo studio. Your tattoo artist should cover your tattoo with some type of wrap (cling wrap, medical pads, etc.

  • ) to protect it on your way home;
  • “This usually stays on for approximately 2 hours,” says Caldwell;
  • “It will trap any of the blood and plasma (clear fluid) that leaks out immediately after being tattooed;

This bandage also protects your new tattoo from the outside elements and keeps the blood from clotting to form a scab. ” How To Take Care Of Colored Tattoo Your tattoo artist will cover your tattoo with a temporary bandage or plastic wrap. After removing the covering placed on your tattoo by your artist, you should carefully wash the tattoo with warm, soapy water using an unscented, antibacterial soap. Do not use any type of washcloth or loofah—simply clean it with your hands to remove any plasma and ink from your skin.

“You want to make sure you always pat dry with clean paper towels and then apply a thin layer of ointment,” says Caldwell. Try to wear loose-fitting clothing to bed, since your tattoo will likely continue to leak overnight.

Days 1-3: Oozing and Sore During the first few days, your tattoo is still an open wound and will be sore, painful, and warm to the touch. The skin around your tattoo might also appear slightly red and swollen. During the first days of tattoo healing your tattoo will continue to release plasma, blood, and ink—this is completely normal.

Plasma, which is a clear liquid, makes up the largest part of your blood ( 55 percent ) and it’s release is part of your skin’s natural healing process. It’s important to keep your tattoo as clean as possible during this time.

Follow the same cleaning instructions (wash with soapy water, pat dry, apply a thin layer of ointment) as the night before. “Wash your new tattoo at least two times a day—when you wake up and before bed,” says Caldwell. If the tattoo is really leaky, you can add one more wash to the rotation to remove excess goop. How To Take Care Of Colored Tattoo Wash your new tattoo carefully in the shower using fragrance-free soap. Apply a thin layer of moisturizer or aftercare ointment after your tattoo is fully dry to help minimize scabbing. “The moisturizer/ointment is crucial to keeping your tattoo from forming a scab,” says Caldwell. “The softening of the skin prevents this. ” Follow your artist’s aftercare instructions carefully.

  • All tattoo artists recommend different aftercare products and have their own tattoo healing methods;
  • Trust and listen to your artist;
  • Days 3-7: Dry, Tight, and Starting to Flake After the third or fourth day following your tattoo appointment, your tattoo will begin to dry out;

It may feel tight. Swelling should start to subside, though your skin might still feel warm and uncomfortable. By the end of the first week, you will likely see your tattoo flaking. This is also a normal part of the tattoo healing process. How To Take Care Of Colored Tattoo What tattoo flaking looks like. “Flaking is simply your body shedding its outermost layer of skin,” says Erin Belley , an artist who works at the Parkdale location of Boss Tattoos Collective in Calgary, Alberta. “But this time, the skin had been damaged and filled with ink, so it comes off in larger flakes and full of color.

” If you see your tattoo flaking, don’t be alarmed. This is not a sign that ink is being removed from the skin. Just make sure you let your tattoo flake naturally. “As long as you’re not picking at it, scrubbing it, or peeling the flaky skin off, you should be fine,” adds Caldwell.

Days 7-14: More Flaking, Scabbing, and Itching During the second week of tattoo healing, your tattoo will continue to flake, and you may start to see scabs forming over some areas of the tattoo. While trying to prevent scabbing is recommended, tattoo scabbing is not uncommon.

“I would consider scabbing normal, but not ideal in tattoo healing,” says Belley. “Scabbing is what happens when the plasma is not efficiently cleaned off of the tattoo after your body is finished producing it (usually between 24-48 hours) and it evaporates and dries.

” Caldwell explains that scabbing may also happen if you apply too much moisturizer or ointment to your tattoo or if a particular part your skin was overworked during your session. Do not pick at the scabs on your tattoo. Continue to wash and lightly moisturize your tattoo as instructed by your artist.

During this time, you may also experience the dreaded tattoo itch. Some may experience a mild itch, while others will experience an intense itch. Your skin will be dry and flakey as it heals, so some level of itchiness is to be expected.

Some clients may also have a slight allergic reaction to some inks, which may cause an itchy feeling. Although it may take every ounce of willpower, do not scratch your new tattoo. Not only could this affect how it looks, but you can also cause infection or irritation.

Eventually, the itch should subside. Days 15-30: Slightly Dry and Dull Most tattoos will finish flaking and essentially be healed around the 2-week mark. But it still may take a couple of weeks for your tattoo to fully settle in.

During this time, your tattoo may look a little dull or faded. This is normal and once the tattoo is fully healed and settled in, its brightness will return. You may also feel slightly raised portions of your tattoo during this stage, but this should eventually disappear.

How do you tell if a tattoo is healing properly?

– It’s important to know the signs that your tattoo isn’t healing properly or has become infected. Symptoms of improper healing include:

  • Fever or chills. A fever may indicate that your tattoo has become infected, and you should see a doctor right away.
  • Prolonged redness. All tattoos will be somewhat red for a few days after the procedure, but if the redness doesn’t subside , it’s a sign that your tattoo isn’t healing well.
  • Oozing fluid. If fluid or pus is still coming out from your tattoo after 2 or 3 days, it may be infected. See a doctor.
  • Swollen, puffy skin. It’s normal for the tattoo to be raised for a few days, but the surrounding skin shouldn’t be puffy. This may indicate that you’re allergic to the ink.
  • Severe itching or hives. Itchy tattoos can also be a sign that your body is allergic to the ink. The allergic reaction to a tattoo can happen right after, or as much as several years after getting the tattoo.
  • Scarring. Your tattoo will scab over because it’s a wound, but a properly healed tattoo shouldn’t scar. Signs of scarring include raised, puffy skin, redness that doesn’t fade, distorted colors within the tattoo, or pitted skin.