How To Deal With Tattoo Regret?

How To Deal With Tattoo Regret

Tattoo Cover Ups – Covering a tattoo with another is a difficult process. Depending on the design of your current tattoo and the design that you’d like to replace it with, a cover up may provide the results you’re looking for. But that isn’t always the case.

Covering up dark inks and fresh tattoos can be difficult, which is why laser tattoo removal is always recommended before a cover up. A few treatments will lighten the ink enough to make a cover up easier and help your new ink look fresh.

If you choose to undergo laser tattoo removal, head to Body Details True Laser Hair and Tattoo Removal, the only company that offers a free lifetime guarantee. We offer tattoo removal in Miami and several other South Florida cities with convenient night and weekend hours, so be sure to schedule a free consultation by calling 866-708-8645 or visiting one of our skin laser centers near you ..

Is it normal to feel regret after getting a tattoo?

It’s not unusual for a person to change their mind after getting a tattoo. In fact, one survey says 75 percent of their 600 respondents admitted to regretting at least one of their tattoos. But the good news is there are things you can do before and after getting a tattoo to lower your chances of regret.

How long does it take to regret a tattoo?

You Got It on a Whim – It’s no surprise that, the longer you’ve been considering a tattoo, the less likely you are to bemoan it after the fact. Nearly 30 percent of regretted tattoos are spur-of-the-moment decisions. The longer a man waits—a few days at least, but ideally a few years—the less likely he is to regret his choice.

What do I do if I don’t like my new tattoo?

Perhaps you spent days thinking about your dream body ink and thought you had a definite idea of exactly where you wanted your new tattoo to be on your body. Or maybe, you just felt like trying something new on a whim. Either way, if you’re no longer in love with a tattoo, then you’re not entirely out of luck.

Can tattoos cause depression?

A new study has discovered that people with tattoos were more likely to be diagnosed with mental health issues and to report sleep problems. Researchers also found that people who had tattoos were more likely to be smokers, to have spent time in jail, and to have a higher number of sex partners in the past year.

However, the survey-based study also found that having tattoos was not significantly related to overall health status. The survey was conducted in July 2016 and resulted in a sample of 2,008 adults living in the United States, according to researchers.

“Previous research has established an association between having a tattoo and engaging in risky behaviors,” said lead author Dr. Karoline Mortensen, a professor at the University of Miami. “In an era of increasing popularity of tattoos, even among women and working professionals, we find these relationships persist, but are not associated with lower health status.

  • ” The study was published in the International Journal of Dermatology;
  • Source: Wiley Photo: In a survey-based study published in the International Journal of Dermatology, having tattoos was not significantly related to overall health status, but individuals with tattoos were more likely to be diagnosed with a mental health issue and to report sleep problems;

Credit: International Journal of Dermatology ..

When can I stop worrying about my tattoo?

– A tattoo will usually take 2–4 weeks to heal. During this time, it is important people closely follow aftercare guidance to ensure their tattoo heals and to avoid complications. If the tattoo develops an infection or excessive inflammation, it can slow the healing process.

What is the most regretted tattoo?

If you’re planning to get a tattoo, sleep on it. And not just for a night—at least a few months. That’s what we found when we surveyed 600 people with tattoo regret. The big takeaway: 3 out of 4 people who suffer from “tattoo regret” didn’t plan for the tattoo beyond a few weeks. – How To Deal With Tattoo Regret Still itching to get inked? Keep in mind: Of the people we talked to (the majority being teenagers to twentysomethings), a whopping 78 percent regret at least one of their tattoos. And 19 percent of participants with two tattoos regret both. Planning ahead is the best way you can make sure you don’t suffer from tattoo regret. In fact, 1 in 4 people who made a spontaneous decision to get a tattoo, regretted it within a few days. That said, there was still a small fraction of people (5 percent) who spent years thinking about getting a tattoo and regretted it within days.

Yikes! Read on. If you still decide that getting a tattoo is right for you, remember: location, location, location. Participants told us they regret getting tattoos on these spots: upper back, upper arms, hips, face and butt.

Size matters. Apparently, the smaller your tattoo, the more likely you are to regret it. We found that 63 percent of people with a tattoo smaller than the palm of their hand regret it. However, only 2 percent of people with full-sleeves or longer, regret their tattoo.

Perhaps that’s because people with full-sleeves or longer spent more time thinking about it. Plus, it’s easier, and faster, to get a star on your shoulder, than it is to go full-on Travis Barker. Some symbols cause more regret than others.

You might want to think twice before you go for something tribal, a heart or roses. People were less likely to regret inking the moon, Celtic symbols or Roman numerals, but these were still in the top twenty of most regrettable tattoo content. Your emotional state before getting the tattoo could also affect your regret level.

  1. Here are the most common reasons why people regret their tattoos: impulsive decision (35 percent), significant meaning (29 percent), or the idea that it would make them look cool (18 percent);
  2. The more thoughtful and careful you are about your tattoo, the less likely you are to regret it;

And if you do, you can always get it removed !.

Which celebrities regret their tattoos?

Are tattoos becoming less popular?

How To Deal With Tattoo Regret Tattoos are expensive pieces of permanent art for the body that require a lot of time and resources to be done properly by experienced professionals who have taken extensive training. Therefore, a lot of thought should go into the idea of getting a tattoo since the only way to get rid of them is with very painful laser treatment or to cover them up with yet another tattoo. Tattoos are not going out of style. As stigma wanes and quality standards improve, tattoos are steadily gaining popularity and social acceptance.

How do you cope with a tattoo you don’t like?

  • Tattoos are a super popular art form and they’re known for being permanent but if you’re not satisfied with your ink you have a few options.
  • Touch-ups, cover-up designs, and laser removal are some possible ways to deal with a tattoo you no longer want.
  • However, every tattoo must be approached on a case-by-case basis. Some tattoos can be removed completely but others, especially those with vibrant colors, are not as easy to get rid of.
  • By working with removal specialists and professional tattoo artists, it’s possible to get rid of ink you don’t like or turn it into a design you love.
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more stories.

Loading Something is loading. Many people treasure their tattoos and wear them with pride — but not every person has a wonderful experience with ink. Fortunately, whether you’re unhappy with the quality of your ink or it symbolizes something you’d rather forget, your tattoo doesn’t necessarily have to be on your body forever.

To learn more, INSIDER spoke with professional tattoo artist Baris Yesilbas of Fleur Noire Tattoo Parlour and Dr. Will Kirby, board-certified dermatologist and chief medical officer for aesthetic-dermatology group LaserAway.

Here’s what you should know about dealing with a tattoo you don’t like.

Do tattoos affect relationships?

The study, which was conducted by researchers at Jagiellonian University Medical College in Poland, tested the effect of tattoos on 2,580 people’s (okay, mostly women’s) perceptions of men. Because getting inked   is painful and — back in the day — was dangerous enough to be a medical risk for infection, the researchers speculated that men with tattoos were historically perceived as healthier and stronger, and thus would be more attractive to women.

In their study, the researchers hoped to determine the way that tattoos are linked to perceptions of attractiveness, masculinity, dominance, and aggression — in addition to how good of a partner and father each man might be.

To study these effects, male models posed with or without a tattoo, then participants in the study (both men and women) were asked to rate the men on different qualities. The results confirmed the hypothesis in part: Women said that they saw guys with tattoos as healthier, but the tats surprisingly had no influence on ratings of attractiveness. Overall, men with tattoos were also perceived as more dominant, aggressive, and masculine by both men and women (since all subjects were heterosexual, this could imply that men think women prefer tattooed men over non-tattooed men). While some women find these attributes desirable, the study showed a disconnect between perceived health and the way that women view potential parenting partners with tattoos.

  1. In general, men with the tattoos were seen as being less likely to be a good partner and parent;
  2. Harsh;
  3. Guys with tattoos are definitely still crush-worthy… but female participants basically said men without ink have more long-term relationship potential;

One non-scientific note when thinking about the connection between these qualities and the bearer of the ink is what type of tattoo someone has. On one hand, barbed wire might have a certain connotation, whereas a tattoo concerning a special place or person might have the opposite effect.

  1. Or just go ahead and have some casual fun with your crush, who has some majorly hot ink;
  2. Either way, your tats (and who you date) is your choice — so ink away! How do you feel about your S;
  3. ‘s tattoos? Let us know @BritandCo ! ( Photos via Getty ) Gabrielle Gresge Gabrielle Gresge is a Chicago native and journalism student at the University of Missouri;
You might be interested:  How Much Does A Portrait Tattoo Cost?

While not chasing deadlines, she enjoys giving campus tours, exploring her new home, and missing her old one. She loves to write about these experiences in her own handwriting at gabriellegresge. wordpress. com..

Can a new tattoo be removed easily?

The short answer is yes – a fresh tattoo can be removed. Our experts recommend waiting until your tattoo has completely healed which can take around six to eight weeks after having the tattoo before you start your removal sessions.

Are people with tattoos less healthy?

– However, the tattoo’s spike in popularity has diminished some of the negative assumptions. As the authors of the report in Pediatrics continue, “the scientific link between tattooing and risk behaviors is less consistent today. ” Earlier research in Germany connected wearing tattoos with mental health issues.

Other studies have linked them to increased sexual activity, among other things. Evidence, though, is contradictory and researchers often find it difficult to interpret. A new study, published in the International Journal of Dermatology, takes a fresh look.

As “getting inked” becomes more commonplace and attitudes toward tattoos shift, the authors wanted to draw an updated picture of today’s tattooed population. Specifically, they focused on health-related outcomes and risky behaviors. To investigate, they used data from a survey that researchers conducted in July 2016.

  • In total, there were 2,008 participants, all of whom were living in the United States;
  • The survey included questions about medical diagnoses, perceived health — both physical and mental — drug use, sexual activity, and sleep quality;

The survey also noted how many tattoos each participant had, how visible they were, and whether some people might consider them offensive. In their analysis, the scientists also controlled for a range of demographic characteristics, such as race, education level, and marital status.

Why are tattoos so addictive?

– Your body releases a hormone called adrenaline when under stress. The pain you feel from the tattoo needle can produce this stress response, triggering a sudden burst of energy often referred to as an adrenaline rush. This might cause you to:

  • have an increased heart rate
  • feel less pain
  • have jitters or a restless feeling
  • feel as if your senses are heightened
  • feel stronger

Some people enjoy this feeling so much that they seek it out. You can experience an adrenaline rush from the process of getting your first tattoo , so adrenaline may be one of the reasons people go back for more tattoos. Some adrenaline-seeking behaviors might resemble compulsive or risk-taking behaviors often associated with drug addiction.

  1. You may have even heard someone call themself an ” adrenaline junkie;
  2. ” But there’s no scientific evidence supporting the existence of adrenaline addiction, and the “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders” doesn’t list it as a diagnosable condition;

Part of the reason you want another tattoo could be that you enjoy the rush you feel when going under the needle, so you may want to take some extra time to make sure you really want that ink. If getting another tattoo doesn’t cause you distress or put anyone else at risk, go for it.

What does having tattoos say about a person?

Author:  Sophia Carter – Institution:  Whitworth University ABSTRACT Research supports personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals. However, few studies have investigated whether any of these differences are associated with positive indicators for tattooed individuals.

In this study, personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals in three of the Big Five personality areas considered critical to successful employees in the workforce were examined.

Previous research has established that higher levels of conscientiousness and extraversion coupled with lower levels of neuroticism are indicators of high-quality employees. The present study attempts to augment this line of research by adding the dimension of tattoos; investigating whether individuals with tattoos report more positive personality indicators in these dimensions than individuals without tattoos.

Thus it was hypothesized that tattooed individuals would report higher levels of conscientiousness and extraversion and lower levels of neuroticism than non-tattooed individuals. For this purpose,  N  = 521 individuals completed an online survey, which included the 44-Question Big Five Inventory.

An independent sample t -test revealed a statistically significant difference between tattooed ( M  = 3. 41,  SD  = 0. 77) and non-tattooed ( M  = 3. 21,  SD  = 0. 83) groups in the Big Five personality area of extraversion,  t  (521) = 0. 39,  p  =. 004,  d  = 0.

25. There were no other statistically significant differences. These findings indicate that tattooed individuals may be better employees than previously believed, as the extraversion component of the Big Five Inventory, has been found to be a critical indicator of successful job performance.

INTRODUCTION Tattoos have increased in popularity over the last two decades; almost one in five people across all age groups had a tattoo as of 2012, and one in ten people have two or more tattoos (Swami et al. , 2012). Nearly 40% of young adults (18-25) have at least one tattoo, whereas only 15-16% of members of this age group in 1990 were tattooed (Swami et al.

, 2012). Despite the increase in tattoos within younger generations, tattooed individuals face discrimination, negative stigma, and lower levels of employment than their non-tattooed counterparts (Horne, Knox, Zusman, & Zusman, 2007).

Very little research has examined whether individuals with tattoos score differently than non-tattooed individuals on scales measuring personality traits perceived as positive. This study seeks to address this gap by identifying personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals and the potential implications of those differences for employment.

Historically, the traits associated with tattooed individuals have depended significantly on the culture and circumstances of those individuals. Captain Cook explored Polynesia in 1769 and observed the social and spiritual significance of tattoos in Polynesian culture.

The location of a tattoo on an individual’s body and the specific tattoo design displayed social, hierarchal, and genealogical information about the owner of the tattoo, as well as signaling particular aspects of his or her character (Parry, 1933). Tattooing was considered a sacred ceremony, and most tattoos were thought to fetch spiritual power, protection, and strength.

Almost every Polynesian individual had tattoos, and many of Captain Cook’s men left their voyage with a permanent memento of their expedition, which was considered a great honor (Parry, 1933). Similarly, Native Americans report a long and extensive history of traditional tattoos.

Depending on the tribe, tattoos could signal hierarchy or a specific role within the tribe, mark a warrior’s prowess in battle, or be considered marks of beauty (Littell, 2003). Since then, through the shift towards Western culture and through changing definitions of art, tattoos have become more associated with criminals and the sexually promiscuous (Wohlrab, Fink, & Kappeler, 2005).

  • Recent studies have shown there are still many stereotypes attached to individuals with tattoos: academic struggle, broken homes, traumatic childhoods, rarely or never attending church, poor decision-making skills, and susceptibility to peer pressure (Roberts & Ryan, 2002);

However, these stereotypes may not accurately represent the current tattoo climate. Forty percent of 26 to 40-year-olds now have a tattoo, closely followed by 36% of 18 to 25-year-olds (Swami et al. , 2012). The rising popularity of tattoos among young to middle aged individuals suggests that tattoos may hold different significance sociologically, biologically, and socially than they have throughout the previous century (Wohlrab et al.

, 2005). Research is mixed on whether the negative stereotypes associated with tattoos are accurate. A study completed in 2007 in Germany evaluating tattooed and non-tattooed individuals using a Big Five Personality Inventory found that tattooed individuals scored higher on the subscale of extraversion, and lower on the subscale of neuroticism (Wohlrab, 2007).

More recently, a 2012 study of 540 individuals from Austria and Germany examined Big Five personality traits in participants, as well as a need for uniqueness, sensation seeking, self-esteem, religious and spiritual belief, and demographic variables. The researchers in this study concluded that not only do those with tattoos have higher levels of need for uniqueness, sensation seeking, and thrill and adventure seeking, but they have lower levels of self-esteem, attend religious services less, and are generally much less educated than individuals who did not have tattoos (Swami et al.

  1. , 2012);
  2. For decades, businesses have attempted to identify personality traits that predict a successful employee;
  3. When United States federal law banned the use of polygraphs for employee selection in 1988, hirers began using personality surveys as the primary method for making hiring decisions (Stabile, 2013);

Job interviewers now ask questions designed to reveal components of an individual’s personality in order to evaluate where that individual would best fit within the company structure, how committed to the job the individual would be, and their likelihood of advancing through the company ranks (Wohlrab, 2007).

However, studies as late as 2010 have shown that despite this shift to personality-based hiring, companies still discard potential employees on the basis of their tattoos (Burgess, & Clark 2010). Researchers have also attempted to determine personality traits capable of predicting successful employees.

A 2014 ten-year longitudinal study of over 8,000 individuals working within multiple big business companies revealed that there is a significant statistical difference between the managerial and working classes in three Big Five personality dimensions: neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness (Palaiou & Furnham, 2014).

Conscientiousness was shown to be the best predictor of overall successful job performance and individuals who scored higher in this dimension tended to be more achievement oriented (Li, Barrick, Zimmerman, & Chiabaru, 2014).

Neuroticism successfully predicted poor work performance; the lower the levels of neuroticism, the higher the level of performance from the employee (Barrick, Mount, & Judge, 2001). Finally, higher levels of extraversion were linked to higher levels of task performance and proactivity (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

This study attempts to augment the area of research pertaining to tattooed individuals’ personality traits by investigating whether tattooed individuals differ significantly when compared to their non-tattooed peers in areas related to successful employee traits.

It was hypothesized that tattooed individuals would score higher in conscientiousness and extraversion and lower in neuroticism as measured by the Big Five Inventory. MATERIALS AND METHODS Participants Participants were recruited through a campus-wide e-mail at Whitworth University, Facebook psychology groups, and global online psychology research forums.

Participation was entirely voluntary, and participants could complete the study on their own time at their own pace. 521 individuals completed the survey, 411 females and 110 males, aged from 18 to 62 years old.

You might be interested:  What Does An Eagle Tattoo Symbolize?

Materials Participants completed an online version of the 44-Question Big Five Inventory (John, Donahue, & Kentle, 1991) followed by basic demographic questions addressing age, sex, education level, and university affiliation of the participant. Participants were also asked if they had any tattoos.

  1. Participants with tattoos were asked to indicate the size and location of those tattoos;
  2. The survey measured the Big Five areas of personality: openness to experience, neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, and agreeableness;

For example, questions measuring conscientiousness asked the participant to rate statements such as: “I am someone who does a thorough job” or “I am a reliable worker” on a five-point Likert scale. Items measuring neuroticism stated, “I am someone who remains calm in tense situations” and “I am someone who is emotionally stable, not easily upset”.

Finally, items related to extraversion included statements such as “I am someone who is talkative” and “I am someone who is full of energy” (John et al. , 1991). Participants were asked to rate their agreement with a series of such statements on a five-point Likert on a scale of one (“strongly disagreeing”) to five (“strongly agreeing”).

The Big Five Inventory has scored between 0. 73 – 0. 82 on Cronbach’s alpha test over the course of its development, giving it a high degree of internal consistency and thus, reliability (Schmitt et al. , 2007). The survey contained nine questions regarding conscientiousness, eight questions regarding neuroticism, and eight questions regarding extraversion.

  1. The three personality subscales of conscientiousness, extraversion, and neuroticism were scored using a formula that calculated a numerical value for each personality dimension by adding each individual’s selected scores on the Likert scale, which were then averaged between all participants for an overall mean;

RESULTS A total of N  =521 individuals completed the survey. Of that 521, 411 were female and 110 were male. Participant age varied from 18 to 68 years old. Participants were current students or alumni from 54 universities of various sizes in both rural and urban locations throughout the United States.

Two hundred sixty-six (51%) identified themselves as having no tattoos and two hundred fifty-five (49%) identified themselves as having tattoos. A two-tailed independent sample t -test revealed no statistically significant difference in levels of conscientiousness between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals ( p  =.

30; Figure 1). Like conscientiousness, a two-tailed independent sample t-test revealed no statistically significance difference on the neuroticism personality scale between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals ( p  =. 53; Figure 1). Results revealed a statistically significant result regarding extraversion.

A two-tailed independent sample t-test revealed a statistically significance difference between tattooed individuals ( M  = 3. 41,  SD  = 0. 77) and non-tattooed individuals ( M  = 3. 21,  SD  = 0. 83,  p  =.

004; Figure 1). DISCUSSION The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there were positive traits associated with individuals who have tattoos. It was proposed that tattooed individuals would score higher on the conscientiousness and extraversion domains and lower on the neuroticism domain as measured by the Big Five Inventory than their non-tattooed peers.

Tattooed individuals scored significantly higher in extraversion than their non-tattooed peers, but there were no significant differences in conscientiousness or neuroticism between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals.

Though tattooed individuals did not differ significantly in two of the three areas tested in this study, the significant difference in extraversion suggests that those individuals with one or more tattoos may display higher levels of task performance and proactivity in the business world (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

A growing body of literature suggests tattooed individuals display different personality traits than their non-tattooed counterparts, and this study lends further support to this hypothesis. Specifically, the present study supports the findings from several other studies that tattooed individuals consistently score higher in extraversion than their non-tattooed peers (e.

, Stirn, Hinz, & Brahler, 2006; Swami, 2012; Swami et al. , 2012 Wohlrab, Stahl, Rammsayer, & Kappeler, 2007). This study may be limited by the high proportion of female participants ( n  = 411) compared to and male participants n  = 110). A study in which males and females are equally represented could be better extrapolated to the general public.

However, a similar study, performed in 2012 with 45. 6% male participants found very similar results to the present study; tattooed individuals scored significantly higher than non-tattooed individuals in extraversion, but did not score differently in any of the other Big Five personality dimensions (Swami et al.

, 2012). Future research should be conducted with a more age-diverse sample, as the present study had a mean age of 24. 47 years old. Though this study lends itself well to explaining the personality attributes of the younger generation, it does not shed any light onto the baby boomer generation, who are currently the individuals holding CEO, managerial, and most importantly, hiring positions over the younger population (Odgers Berndtson, 2012).

Over the next decade, a mass exodus of baby boomers is expected to occur, leaving open positions for the younger generation (Odgers Berndtson, 2012). However, if baby boomers are still utilizing stigmatized hiring criteria regarding tattoos, they are excluding a class of individuals who are more proactive and task performance oriented than their age-matched peers (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006).

Gathering more research regarding generational differences in personality attributes and attitudes towards tattoos may have the potential to change current hiring criteria. Additionally, examining the final two personality domains (agreeableness and openness to experience) in the Big Five Inventory may lead to further information regarding the relationship between tattoos and personality, which could divulge more information regarding desirable characteristics in employees.

  • Agreeableness has been correlated with success in several specific job fields, such as those that require considerable interpersonal interaction;
  • Similarly, the openness to experience dimension has predicted success in fields where teamwork and training performance are important (Barrick et al;

, 2001). Finally, associations between tattoos and personality could be further explored by examining whether the effect is binary (tattoo vs. non-tattoo) or a gradient (influenced by the quantity of tattoos). Tattooing has rapidly become a prevalent phenomenon in western culture.

It may therefore be time to reexamine the stigma attached to hiring tattooed individuals. Extraversion, which indicates higher levels of task performance and proactivity in a job setting (Pearsall & Ellis, 2006), is starting, through recent research, to become associated with tattooed individuals.

The business industry stands to gain quality employees who may be well suited to long-term success and significant contributions to the company if hiring criteria regarding tattoos were to be reassessed (Sackett, Burris, & Ryan, 1989). REFERENCES

  1. Barrick, M. , Mount, M. , & Judge, T. (2001). Personality and performance at the beginning of the new millennium. What do we know and where do we go next? International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 9 , 9-30.
  2. Burgess, M. , & Clark, L. (2010). Do the “savage origins” of tattoos cast a prejudicial shadow on contemporary tattooed individuals? Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 40 , 746-764.
  3. Horne, J. , Knox, D. , Zusman, J. , and Zusman, M. (2007) Tattoos and piercings: Attitudes, behaviours, and interpretations of college students. College Student Journal, 41 , 1011-1020.
  4. John, O. , Donahue, E. , & Kentle, R. (1991). The Big Five Inventory–Versions 4a and 54. Berkeley, CA: University of California, Berkeley, Institute of Personality and Social Research.
  5. Li, N. , Barrick, M. , Zimmerman, R. , & Chiabaru, D. (2014). Retaining the productive employee: The role of personality. The Academy of Management Annals, 8 , 347-395.
  6. Littell, A. (2003). The illustrated self: Construction of meaning through tattoo images and their narratives (Doctoral Dissertation). Retrieved from Proquest database. (Order No. AAI3077541).
  7. Odgers Berndtson. (2012). After the Baby Boomers: A Next Generation of Leadership [Brochure]. London: England, Cass Business School.
  8. Palaiou, K. & Furnham, A. (2014). Are bosses unique? Personality facet differences between CEOs and staff in five work sectors. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, 66 , 173-196.
  9. Parry, A. (1933). Tattoo; Secrets of a strange art as practiced among the natives of the United States. Madison, WI: Simon and Schuster.
  10. Pearsall, M. , & Ellis, A. (2006). The effects of critical team member assertiveness on team performance and satisfaction. Journal of Management, 32 , 575-594.
  11. Roberts, T. , & Ryan, S. (2002). Tattooing and high risk behavior in adolescents. Pediatrics, 110 , 1058-1063.
  12. Sackett PR, Burris LR, Ryan AM. (1989). Coaching and practice effects in personnel selection. In Coo per CL, Robertson IT (Eds. ), International review of industrial and organizational psychology (pp. 145–183). New York: Wiley.
  13. Schmitt, D. , Allik, J. , McCrae, R. , Benet-Martínez, V. , Alcalay, L. , & Ault, L. (2007). The geographic distribution of Big Five personality traits: Patterns and profiles of human self-description across 56 nations. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 38 , 173–212.
  14. Stabile, S. (2013). The use of personality tests as a hiring tool: Is the benefit worth the cost?. University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business Law, 4 , 279-288.
  15. Stirn, A. , Hinz, A. , & Brahler, E. (2006). Prevalence of tattooing and body piercing in Germany and perception of health, mental disorders, and sensation seeking among tattooed and body-pierced individuals. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 60 , 531-534
  16. Swami, V. (2012). Written on the body? Individual differences between British adults who do and do not obtain a first tattoo. Scandinavian Journal Of Psychology, 53 , 407-412.
  17. Swami, V. , Pietschnig, J. , Bertl, B. , Nader, I. , Stieger, S. , & Voracek, M. (2012). Personality differences between tattooed and non-tattooed individuals. Psychological Reports, 111 , 97-106.
  18. Tate, J. , & Shelton, B. (2008) Personality correlates of tattooing and body piercing in a college sample: the kids are alright. Personality and Individual Differences, 45 , 281-285.
  19. Wohlrab, S. (2007). Differences in personality characteristics between body-modified and non-modified individuals: Associations with individual personality traits and their possible evolutionary implications. European Journal Of Personality, 21 , 931-951.
  20. Wohlrab, S. , Fink, B. , & Kappeler, P. (2005). Human body ornaments from an evolutionary perspective – Diversity and function of tattoos, piercings, and scarification. Mitteilungen der Anthropologischen Gesellschaft Wein, 134/135 , 1-10.
  21. Wohlrab, S. , Stahl, J. , Rammsayer, T. , & Kappeler, P. (2007) Differences in personality characteristics between body modified and nonmodified individuals and possible evolutionary implications. European Journal of Personality, 21 , 931-951.

How can I make my tattoo fade faster?

Download Article Download Article While results can be mixed, there are a couple of ways to reduce the appearance of unwanted tattoos without resorting to surgery. Your best bet is to begin daily applications of a mild skin-lightening agent like hydrogen peroxide or lemon juice. If you’re looking for a faster, more direct approach, you could also try exfoliating the tattoo thoroughly 2-3 times a day with a homemade salt scrub or similar abrasive mixture.

  1. 1 Use common household items to lighten your tattooed skin naturally. Lemon and lime juice , glycolic acid, and hydrogen peroxide can all produce mild bleaching action when applied directly to the skin. Chances are, you have one or more of these items sitting around in your pantry or medicine cabinet right now. [1]
    • Some holistic skincare experts also swear by the skin-lightening properties of undiluted essential oils, such as lavender oil.
    • Avoid mixing multiple lightening agents. Not only will this not make them more effective, it could cause an unsafe chemical reaction.
    • The actual effectiveness of topical skin lightening solutions is up for debate. If you decide to experiment with any of these substances, you’ll be doing so at your own risk. There’s a chance that they may not work permanently, or that they could result in scarring or similar damage. [2]
  2. 2 Try a tattoo remover cream if you’d rather use a commercial product. There are a number of creams, lotions, and gels on the market that claim to be able to rapidly fade subdermal ink. If you’re not interested in DIY solutions, consider giving one of these products a shot. Keep in mind, however, that there’s no hard evidence that they make much of a difference. [3]
    • Ask your tattoo artist if they have any recommendations for tattoo remover products that do what they’re advertised to do.
    • Tattoo removers often contain harsh chemicals, and could lead to irritation or even permanent scarring if applied regularly or incorrectly. [4]

    Advertisement

  3. 3 Rub your skin lightener of choice onto the tattoo until it’s fully absorbed. Saturate a washcloth, clean sponge, or folded strip of gauze with the liquid, then apply it to directly to your skin. You can do this by either blotting the area or covering the entire tattoo with the cloth, sponge, or gauze, if it’s small enough. What’s important is that the liquid makes contact with every part of the ink. [5]
    • For best results, allow your skin lightener to sit on your skin for 5-10 minutes after applying it.
    • You may need a helping hand if you’re attempting to fade a tattoo on your back or another hard-to-reach spot.

    Tip: Test your lightening agent on a small, out-of-the-way patch of skin before applying it over a larger area to make sure you won’t react negatively to it. [6]

  4. 4 Continue treating your tattoo 3-5 times a day until you see results. Get in the habit of applying your lightening agent at least twice throughout the course of the day—once in the morning and once in the evening. You’ll need to be persistent with your chosen home remedy if it’s to have any effect.
    • Stop using a particular skin lightener if it begins to cause redness, irritation, blistering, or peeling. [7]
    • Even with continual applications, there’s a chance that your tattoo may not lose its vibrancy.
  5. Advertisement

  1. 1 Mix up a basic homemade salt scrub. Combine ½ a cup (100 g) of coarse sea salt with 1 ⁄ 4 – 1 ⁄ 3 cup (59–79 mL) of olive, coconut, or almond oil in a small lidded container. Keep the container with the rest of your hygiene products, on your bedside table, or somewhere else where you’ll see it and remember to use it every day. [8]
    • If you like, you can also add a few drops of fragrant essential oils and some dried botanical elements to your salt scrub. This won’t affect its abrasive properties, but it will make it smell more pleasant. [9]
    • Salt scrubs are natural, easy to make, and highly effective as far as exfoliants go.
  2. 2 Pick up a gentle, vitamin-infused body scrub if you have sensitive skin. If you don’t like the idea of grinding a scratchy salt paste onto your extremities, you also have the option of buying a gentle commercial exfoliant designed specifically to nourish and protect skin. Along with abrasive elements, these products boast vitamins, minerals, and other key nutrients as main ingredients. [10]
    • Look for scrubs containing Vitamin C, which is especially good for maintaining soft, clear, glowing skin. [11]
    • Alternatively, you could try making your own nourishing body scrub using things like white or brown sugar, Epsom salts, shea butter, honey, coffee grounds, and aloe vera gel.
  3. 3 Apply a small amount of exfoliant directly to the tattoo. Scoop up a quarter-sized glob of your scrub with two fingers to start with and rub it onto the entire area. Smooth on additional exfoliant as needed to ensure that each part of the tattoo is covered with a thin layer.
    • You may need to use quite a bit of scrub if the tattoo you’re trying to erase is particularly large.
  4. 4 Massage the scrub into the tattoo vigorously using a pumice stone. Rather than trying to work the exfoliant in with your fingers, grab a pumice stone and rub it over the tattoo using small, circular motions. Apply light, steady pressure, and be careful not to scrub too hard. Do this for 30-60 seconds. [12]
    • Before you begin scrubbing, soak your pumice stone in a bowl of warm water. This will help it slide across your skin and cut down on unnecessary resistance. [13]
    • The pumice stone will cover a larger area and provide additional scouring power.

    Tip: The idea is to take off the outermost layer of skin a little at a time. Minor discomfort is normal, but if it hurts, try using a softer touch.

  5. 5 Rinse the area thoroughly with lukewarm water. Hold the exfoliated tattoo under a gentle stream to wash away the accumulated scrub and dead skin. Your skin will likely feel a little raw, so avoid using water that’s too hot, along with soaps or cleansers that might irritate or dry it out even more. [14]
    • It may be easier to hop in the shower if you can’t easily rinse your tattoo under the sink, or if you’re trying to fade multiple pieces at once.
    • If you like, you can apply little moisturizer after exfoliating to soothe and protect your skin. [15]
  6. 6 Repeat your exfoliation routine 2-3 times a day for about a month. In all likelihood, you’ll start to see a noticeable difference after a few weeks. Assuming you don’t, your only remaining option will be to talk to a dermatologist or plastic surgeon about a formal tattoo removal procedure. [16]
    • Discontinue treatment immediately if you experience severe or prolonged skin irritation.
  7. Advertisement

  1. 1 Talk to your dermatologist about a laser removal procedure. Laser removal is the only method that has been clinically proven to reduce the appearance of tattoos. During the procedure, specially-trained technicians use concentrated streams of light to break up the ink sitting deep below the surface of the skin. [17]
    • If you want guaranteed, permanent results, it’s highly recommended that you save up your money for a course of laser treatment.
    • While tattoo laser removal is extremely effective, it’s not quick or cheap—a single session can cost as much as $500, and in many cases it can take 2-6 sessions before you start to see a significant difference. [18]
    • Make sure you go to a licensed, reputable laser technician to get a tattoo removed. [19]
  2. 2 Receive a series of chemical peels to erase the tattoo gradually. This type of treatment is sometimes referred to as “chemical resurfacing. ” The way it works is that highly acidic chemicals are applied directly to the top layer of skin, causing it to die. After it sloughs off, the area is given time to heal, eventually leaving behind smooth, clear skin. [20]
    • Chemical peels were the most popular tattoo removal method before the introduction of light-based procedures. Even so, reports vary as to how well they work.
    • These treatments are not without risk. Possible complications include severe chemical burns and permanent scarring. [21]
  3. 3 Undergo surgery to have the tattoo partially removed. With traditional surgery, plastic surgeons actually cut out the layers of skin sitting on top of the embedded ink. The tattoo will no longer be as visible once new skin has grown in its place. [22]
    • Surgery can successfully fade tattoos to some degree, but in many cases surgeons aren’t safely able to cut deep enough to extract the majority of the ink. [23]
    • Like chemical peels it’s possible for a surgical operation to leave scars, bumps, discoloration, and other imperfections.
  4. Advertisement

Add New Question

  • Question How can I make my tattoo fade faster? Grant Lubbock is a Tattoo Artist and Co-Owner of Red Baron Ink, a tattoo salon based in New York City. Grant has over 10 years of tattooing experience and he specializes in neo-traditional, black/grey, and color tattoos. Red Baron Ink’s main goal is for each tattoo coming out of their studio to be one of a kind custom pieces that will look good throughout a lifetime. Tattoo Artist Expert Answer Skip out on applying moisturizing lotions to your tattoo since they can actually prevent tattoos from fading.

Ask a Question 200 characters left Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Submit Advertisement

  • You’re more likely to see a difference in tattoos in high-friction areas, such as your hands, feet, thighs, or the insides of your upper arms. [24]
  • Don’t worry if your tattoo doesn’t disappear altogether—partially-faded tattoos are easier and less expensive to have removed than ones that are still bold.

Advertisement

  • There’s no guarantee that any of the methods described here will be successful. If you want to get rid of a tattoo for good, your best bet is to consult a qualified skin care professional.
  • Ultraviolet light has been shown to help fade tattoos over time. However, it’s not recommended that you spend more time in the sun or tanning bed, as excessive exposure is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer.

Advertisement.

Are tattoos addictive?

– Tattoos have increased in popularity in recent years, and they’ve become a fairly accepted form of personal expression. If you know someone with several tattoos , you may have heard them mention their “tattoo addiction” or talk about how they can’t wait to get another tattoo.

Maybe you feel the same way about your ink. It’s not uncommon to hear a love of tattoos referred to as an addiction. Many people believe tattoos can be addictive. (There’s even a television series called “My Tattoo Addiction.

“) But tattoos aren’t addictive, according to the clinical definition of addiction. The American Psychiatric Association defines addiction as a pattern of substance use or behavior that’s not easily controlled and can become compulsive over time. You might pursue this substance or activity regardless of the problems it might cause and have trouble thinking about or doing anything else.

This description generally doesn’t apply to tattoos. Having a lot of tattoos, planning multiple tattoos, or knowing you want more tattoos doesn’t mean you have an addiction. Many different reasons, some of them psychological, could drive your desire for multiple tattoos, but addiction probably isn’t one of them.

Let’s look more closely at the factors that could be contributing to your desire for more ink.