How A Tattoo Machine Works?

How A Tattoo Machine Works
There are a few basic types of tattoo machines: coil, rotary, and pneumatic. The magnetic coil machine is a classic machine which uses an alternating electromagnetic current to pass through coils and turn magnets on and off in rapid succession. This pulls a spring loaded armature bar and creates an up and down motion, which results in the armature bar tapping the needles into the skin. Coil machines create the notorious buzzing sound that tattoo shops are known for! Another type of tattoo machine is the rotary motored machine, which powers a small spinning motor attached to an armature, which produces an up and down motion. Rotary machines are much quieter than coil machines and are known to move the needles more smoothly and evenly in comparison to coil. Pneumatic tattoo machines were invented in 2000 by Carson Hill. These machines work through the use of pressurized air from air compressors to move the needles up and down. Major advantages to this type of machine is that they’re lightweight and safe to use in an autoclave. The tattoo needles are set at the end of what is called an armature bar, which connects to the part of the machine that travels up and down. The armature bar passes through the “tube” that has a hand grip attached, which is fitted into a vise on the machine to hold it in place. Some artists use tubes that are made of stainless steel, which must be cleaned and sterilized after each use. The steel tubes are preferable for several reasons, however many artists are switching over to disposable plastic tubes like those shown here for reasons of safety and convenience.

  1. The tube is set so that the needles only extend beyond the tip of the tube an appropriate distance;
  2. The up and down motion of the needles in the tube create conditions which draw tattoo pigment up into the tube, and allow it to be released when the needles are running in the skin;

The assembled machine is connected to a power supply by a special wiring harness called a “clip cord” or “RCA cord”. The power supply has settings which can control the speed of the machines, etc, and is most commonly activated by a foot switch, to keep the tattooers hands free.

When the artist is working, they will stretch your skin, press the foot pedal, the machine will run the needles up and down as the tattooer passes the tip of the tube over your skin, the needles carry pigment along as they travel and deposit into your skin where it will stay forever.

Think of tattoo needles like individual hairs in a paint brush. All of the hairs in a paint brush are more or less the same, but we all know that paint brushes come in all shapes and sizes. The same is true for tattoo needles. There are some variations available within each size of needle, for instance the taper at the end of the needle may be long, or short, and the needle may be smooth or textured. Basically there are “liners” and “shaders”. Liner needles are grouped together in various quantities in a round configuration, and are often tightened at the taper so that the points are very close together. Shader needles can also be configured in round patterns, as well as fanned out into what we call Magnums or “Mags”.

  • Other than this all needles are more or less the same;
  • There are other minor variations and some less common configurations that some tattooers use, but essentially this covers what is commonly used;
  • The individual needles are grouped together and soldered in place to form what is referred to as the “tattoo needle”, the needle is then soldered onto what is called a “needle bar”, which is just a length of stainless steel wire with a loop on the end which can be fitted to the part of the tattoo machine that creates the up and down motion;

The unit as a whole is then cleaned, sterilized, and ready to use. The needle bar is placed within the “tube”, a stainless steel (re-useable) or rubber and plastic (disposable) device which provides a hand grip for the machine, that allows the mechanism to function within and through it, and also to provide a reservoir for the pigment.

The amount that the needles actually penetrate the skin is about the thickness of a nickel. Any given tattoo artist may work with a range of different needle groupings in order to create their own style of tattooing, it is truly a tiny stainless steel paint brush, and what sort an artist chooses is a matter of preference.

Source: https://hubtattoo. com/the-machinery/.

What is a tattoo machine and how does it work?

A tattoo machine is a hand-held device generally used to create a tattoo , a permanent marking of the skin with indelible ink. Modern tattoo machines use electromagnetic coils to move an armature bar up and down. Connected to the armature bar is a barred needle grouping that pushes ink into the skin. Tattoo artists generally use the term “machine”, “pen”, or even “iron”, to refer to their equipment, and the word “gun” is also occasionally used.

In addition to “coiled” tattoo machines, there are also rotary tattoo machines, which are powered by regulated motors rather than electromagnetic coils. “The basic machine is pretty much unchanged today, in recent years variations of the theme have crept into the market, namely Manfred Kohr’s Rotary machine of 1976 or Carson Hill’s pneumatic machine that uses compressed air rather than electricity, but the principle is essentially the same.

” [1].

How does a rotary tattoo machine work?

How A Tattoo Machine Works When getting a tattoo, most people might not think it’s important to know much about the equipment used in the process. After all, it’s difficult to understand how the machines work and what materials are required without the years of study a tattoo artist puts in. So why bother, right? Well, here’s why — the equipment affects your tattoo. Which machine is being used, the number of needles, aftercare materials — the right equipment combined with the right artist will result in the best tattoo you could get.

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Which is why it is important to understand the basics! Determining which tattoo machines are the best first requires understanding what makes a good tattoo machine, to begin with. Tattoo machines are usually either a coil machine or a rotary machine.

Coil machines use power to move the armature bar and tattoo needle towards the coil, which then pulls the needle into the skin. This breaks the circuit, which causes the needle to pull back into the machine. The constant repetition of this process is how a coil machine works.

  1. Did those words just fly over your head? Well, here’s a visual to help you out: Put simply, coils work like a hammer and drive the needle into the skin;
  2. These machines are quite powerful, which is why they are usually used for larger groupings of needles;

Larger needles clusters are used when an artist has a larger area to cover, such as with shading. While these machines can be used for lining and detailing, it requires precision and this means it works best in the hands of an experienced tattooist. Additionally, because of how forceful these machines can be, it requires a greater understanding of ink and skin on the tattoo artist’s part since these machines need to be tuned frequently and are quite heavy.

  1. The artist needs to really know how their machine works to make sure it inks consistently;
  2. Besides this, the power of these machines means any errors might lead to more skin damage and thus a longer healing period;

So if an artist is using a coil — they need the skill to match! Rotary machines work on a spinning motor that moves the attached needle up and down, meaning the needle enters your skin in a much more smooth motion as opposed to the forcefulness of a coil.

Because of this, rotaries tend to reduce the amount of time needed for healing once the tattoo is done. Because of how much easier these machines are to use and maintain, they’re a big hit with newer artists.

These machines work well for lining and adding colour, but are less desirable for shading and precision because they do not accommodate large needle clusters quite as well as a coil. Additionally, rotaries do not need to be re-tuned as much and are less noisy, making them ideal for the modern tattoo artist.

Check out this video that shows you the various parts of the Vlad Blad Pro Liner rotary machine, including a short demo of how the parts work. There is no clear answer as to which kind of machine is better — they both have their benefits! Traditional artists often prefer the coil due to its power and precision, while newer artists find the rotary to be a better choice since it is easy to use and works with many different styles of inking.

Some artists might use both, depending on what the job requires. As a client, knowing how the machines works will give you an understanding of what kind of tattoo you’ll get out of it. While the artist’s skill determines how well the machine will work when used, knowing the difference helps you understand why the artist is using a certain machine and whether it matches the design you’ve chosen to get.

  • So how do you tell a coil from a rotary? Coil machines are loud, meaning the buzzing of a machine usually associated with tattoo shops is an indication that they’re using coil machines;
  • You can also look at the mechanism on the machine and work out whether it’s a coil or rotary;

But besides that, you can always just ask! Tattoo artists are usually comfortable talking about their equipment and welcome queries from clients. Whether your artist prefers a coil or a rotary, there are some machines that are considered top of the line across the world.

How many times does a tattoo needle go in per second?

– The tattoo needle punctures your skin around 100 times per second, with the aim of depositing the ink in a region of 1. 5 to 2 millimeters below the surface of the skin. The reason for this depth of penetration is to bypass the outer layer of the skin, or the epidermis.

  1. This part of the skin constantly renews itself;
  2. Every day, thousands of epidermal cells are shed from your skin and replaced with new cells;
  3. Ink injected into the superficial skin layer would simply come off within 3 weeks;

In order to give the ink a permanent home in your body, the tattoo needle must travel through the epidermis into the deeper layer, or the dermis. Nerves and blood vessels are located here, which is why getting a tattoo hurts and your skin tends to bleed.

The bleeding is part of the skin’s natural defense against injury. The result is an influx of immune cells to the site of injury. Macrophages are specialized immune cells, whose job it is to engulf foreign particles and clear them from the tissue.

But this process is only partially successful when it comes to tattoo ink. Some macrophages loaded with ink particles remain in the dermis, while other pigment particles are taken up by the main dermal residents, which are called fibroblasts. Clumps of pigment particles have also been found to stick between the dense collagen fibers of the dermis.

  • Although every new tattoo will display some pigment loss, the majority of the ink will stay in the skin;
  • A study in mice reported that 42 days after tattooing, 68 percent of the dye was still located at the injection site;

But where is the rest of the ink?.

How is a tattoo done step by step?

How does a tattoo machine hold ink?

If you’ve never gotten a tattoo, you might think that a tattoo needle works by “injecting” ink under the skin. That’s sort of true, but close-up and slowed-down footage of the process reveals some nuance. Popular YouTube channel Smarter Every Day  gives a tattoo machine its close-up in the video above (the slow-mo action starts at 3:10).

As you can see, the machine actually has many-pointed needles — and they’re not the same ones you see in the doctor’s office. As Kyle Hill writes on Nerdist, the fluid mechanics that make a tattoo gun work are pretty spectacular: Artists aren’t simply injecting ink from some chamber in the machine into your skin.

They dip the needles into pots of ink, the same way another artist would dip a brush. (In fact, you can watch Smarter Every Day host Destin get an ink-free needle jab in the video) The ink is actually held between the needles. After those needles puncture your skin (just the upper layer, if your tattoo artist knows their stuff — going beneath the fat will cause your tattoo to blur), the ink held between the needles is drawn down.

  • From Nerdist : Once there are hundreds of tiny holes leading down to your dermis — the layer of skin between the epidermis (outer layer) and subcutaneous tissues — the ink  between  the needles is drawn into them by capillary action;
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In short, the surface tension and forces holding the ink together encourages the ink to seep into the holes left by the needles. As someone who’s spent about 11 hours total on the receiving end of a tattoo machine, I can tell you that it’s pretty cool to watch — even without being an inch away from the needles.

You can learn more about tattooing (placement, process, and even different styles) by checking out this interactive. And for some basics on what you should know before getting your first tattoo, watch the video below.

Paul Roe, owner of Britishink Tattoo, tells us what you should know before you get inked. From the type of pigment to the equipment your artist uses, Roe, these are the steps of tattooing. (Video: Ben Dorger/The Washington Post).

How deep do tattoo needles go?

Just How Far Does The Needle Go? – Now that you know a little more about the machine and the needle, it’s time to discuss the third essential piece of the puzzle—your skin. The tattoo needle goes through 1/16th of an inch of skin. That might not sound like a lot of skin, but it is really going through five sublayers of the epidermis, the dermal layer, and also the top layer of the dermis.

Among these layers is a collection of sweat glands, hair follicles, connective tissue, fat, and blood vessels. During a tattoo session, the needle passes through the epidermis and epidermal-dermal junction, opening a passage in the 2mm-thick dermis.

The dermis is ideal for a couple of reasons. It is far enough not to bleed out and isn’t exposed. Knowing this, the tip of the tattoo needle is minutely adjusted to ensure that it enters the skin to the correct depth. If you were to look at a tattoo needle in the machine, you will see that it sticks out no further than 2mm.

Is coil or rotary better?

Our Final Comparison  – Is one better than the other?  Rotary machines are lightweight and easy to use, yet a coil machine can create smooth lines and better shading. Coil machines are easier to maintain but lack the fluidity of motion in the needles, whereas the rotary has better motion quality.

When we consider all the differences between a rotary or coil tattoo machine, we come to one conclusion. It truly is up to the individual tattoo artist to decide which one they prefer. Before making any final decisions, do your research and try both types.

Consider your level of experience and talk to other artists in the tattoo industry. Then, make your own decision..

Why do tattoo artists wrap their machines?

Grips are usually of a universal size and meant to make the tattoo artist’s work much easier, but most end up having to wrap their slick Xion, or other machine’s grip, with cloth material to make it bulkier and easier to hold for intricate illustrations that take a long time.

What happens if a tattoo needle hits a vein?

– This type of tattoo isn’t entirely risk-free. But then, getting a tattoo always involves some level of risk, with an infection being the main cause for concern. The risk for an infection gets a little higher when it comes to tattoos on veins, according to Dr.

Stacey Chimento, a board certified dermatologist at Riverchase Dermatology in Bay Harbor Islands, Florida. “Tattoos involve applying pressure on your skin with a needle, which can rupture the vein, making it bleed into the surrounding tissue and cause an infection,” she says.

If you have varicose veins, Chimento goes on to explain, this could make things worse and result in veins that protrude even further. “Varicose veins struggle to heal due to their pre-existing damage. If pierced during the tattoo session, they could randomly bleed internally or externally, affecting surrounding organs,” she says.

  • Another thing to keep in mind when considering a tattoo to cover varicose veins? How that tattoo could potentially impact any future treatment of the veins;
  • “To treat the diseased veins, they need to be somewhat visible;

And if left untreated, the blood can leak into the leg tissue and cause hyperpigmentation. Although rare, infections and undiagnosed veins can cause a need for urgent care if left untreated,” Chimento says.

What speed do you set a tattoo gun at?

Conclusion – Tattoo needles move up and down at a speed of between 50 and 3,000 times per minute. The rate can vary depending on the needs and preferences of the tattoo artist. Artists can control speed, angle of the needle, ink colors and other aspects of the process with their tattoo machine.

Does tattoo ink go into blood?

Research Continues into the Safety of Tattoos  – As far as tattoo ink getting into your veins goes, the answer is that, yes, it happens. The process involves ink being injected into your dermis, which happens to contain many blood vessels. A skilled tattoo artist can keep the amount of ink getting into your veins to a minimum by injecting the ink at the correct depth.

Can I teach myself to tattoo?

Conclusion – It is possible to teach yourself how to tattoo but you need to put the hours in and practice as much as possible. Speak to reputable tattoo artists for their advice and understand exactly what is required to become successful. If you’re committed and passionate about this career path, you will succeed..

Do tattoo artists draw tattoo first?

17. Rome wasn’t built in a day (and your backpiece won’t be either) – OK, we’re back to reality TV again. Contrary to what you see on television a sleeve or backpiece isn’t completed in an hour, or two or even 6. Large pieces like the back, a sleeve or even half-sleeves require more work than you realize.

Your first step will be a consultation where you’ll discuss your idea with your artist; they’ll trace the area you want tattooed and create a drawing for you. You’ll likely come back at a later date for your first appointment (and to see your drawing – this takes time).

Your custom piece, well that’s going to require multiple sessions with a 2-3 week break in between to heal.

Is having a tattoo a sin?

Sunni Islam [ edit ] – The majority of Sunni Muslims believe tattooing is a sin, because it involves changing the natural creation of God, inflicting unnecessary pain in the process. Tattoos are classified as dirty things, which is prohibited in Islam.

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They believe that a dirty body will directly lead to a dirty mind and will destroy their wudhu, ritual ablution. [24] Some Shafi’i scholars such as Amjad Rasheed argue that tattooing causes impurity and that tattoos were prohibited by the Prophet Muhammad.

They also claim that those who are decorated with tattoos are contaminated with najas , [25] due to potential mixture of blood and coloured pigment that remains upon the surface of the skin. [26] Blood is viewed as an impure substance, so a person with a tattoo cannot engage in several religious practices.

  1. [27] However, in the present day, it is possible to get a tattoo without mixing dye with blood after it exits onto the outer surface of the body, leaving a possibility for a Muslim to wear a tattoo and perform a valid prayer;

Scholar Yusuf al-Qaradawi states that tattoos are sinful because they are an expression of vanity and they alter the physical creation of God. [28] According to the online South African Deobandi fatwa service called Ask-the-Imam , Muslims should remove any tattoos they have if possible or cover them in some way.

What are the different types of tattoo machines?

There are a few basic types of tattoo machines: coil, rotary, and pneumatic. The magnetic coil machine is a classic machine which uses an alternating electromagnetic current to pass through coils and turn magnets on and off in rapid succession. This pulls a spring loaded armature bar and creates an up and down motion, which results in the armature bar tapping the needles into the skin. Coil machines create the notorious buzzing sound that tattoo shops are known for! Another type of tattoo machine is the rotary motored machine, which powers a small spinning motor attached to an armature, which produces an up and down motion. Rotary machines are much quieter than coil machines and are known to move the needles more smoothly and evenly in comparison to coil. Pneumatic tattoo machines were invented in 2000 by Carson Hill. These machines work through the use of pressurized air from air compressors to move the needles up and down. Major advantages to this type of machine is that they’re lightweight and safe to use in an autoclave. The tattoo needles are set at the end of what is called an armature bar, which connects to the part of the machine that travels up and down. The armature bar passes through the “tube” that has a hand grip attached, which is fitted into a vise on the machine to hold it in place. Some artists use tubes that are made of stainless steel, which must be cleaned and sterilized after each use. The steel tubes are preferable for several reasons, however many artists are switching over to disposable plastic tubes like those shown here for reasons of safety and convenience.

The tube is set so that the needles only extend beyond the tip of the tube an appropriate distance. The up and down motion of the needles in the tube create conditions which draw tattoo pigment up into the tube, and allow it to be released when the needles are running in the skin.

The assembled machine is connected to a power supply by a special wiring harness called a “clip cord” or “RCA cord”. The power supply has settings which can control the speed of the machines, etc, and is most commonly activated by a foot switch, to keep the tattooers hands free.

  • When the artist is working, they will stretch your skin, press the foot pedal, the machine will run the needles up and down as the tattooer passes the tip of the tube over your skin, the needles carry pigment along as they travel and deposit into your skin where it will stay forever;

Think of tattoo needles like individual hairs in a paint brush. All of the hairs in a paint brush are more or less the same, but we all know that paint brushes come in all shapes and sizes. The same is true for tattoo needles. There are some variations available within each size of needle, for instance the taper at the end of the needle may be long, or short, and the needle may be smooth or textured. Basically there are “liners” and “shaders”. Liner needles are grouped together in various quantities in a round configuration, and are often tightened at the taper so that the points are very close together. Shader needles can also be configured in round patterns, as well as fanned out into what we call Magnums or “Mags”.

Other than this all needles are more or less the same. There are other minor variations and some less common configurations that some tattooers use, but essentially this covers what is commonly used. The individual needles are grouped together and soldered in place to form what is referred to as the “tattoo needle”, the needle is then soldered onto what is called a “needle bar”, which is just a length of stainless steel wire with a loop on the end which can be fitted to the part of the tattoo machine that creates the up and down motion.

The unit as a whole is then cleaned, sterilized, and ready to use. The needle bar is placed within the “tube”, a stainless steel (re-useable) or rubber and plastic (disposable) device which provides a hand grip for the machine, that allows the mechanism to function within and through it, and also to provide a reservoir for the pigment.

The amount that the needles actually penetrate the skin is about the thickness of a nickel. Any given tattoo artist may work with a range of different needle groupings in order to create their own style of tattooing, it is truly a tiny stainless steel paint brush, and what sort an artist chooses is a matter of preference.

Source: https://hubtattoo. com/the-machinery/.

How many tattoo machines do you need?

However, most artists need at least three machines. Depending on your setup, you may need over ten machines, which adds up quickly. Each needle you use needs an entire machine to run it, so if you need to use ten needles in a tattoo, you need ten machines.

Are tattoo pens less painful?

1 reason for people avoiding tattoos or experiencing issues with the whole process, we cannot simply ignore the fact that tattoo pens hurt significantly less than tattoo guns. So, if pain during tattooing is generally an issue for you, you should be looking for a tattoo artist that works with a tattoo pen.